Forums - Politics Discussion - Trumpís Lead Grows After Debate, Controversy

sc94597 said:

Tell that to people in the nursing and IT fields.

I didn't know the average American was a nurse. I guess you learn something new every day.



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Samus Aran said:
sc94597 said:
 

Yet you believe that people without degrees are less than people with degrees and should not vote. Quite socially egalitarian there.

In my country pretty much everyone has the opportunity to study. So if people don't use that opportunity then that is their fault.


What country is that? 



Mmmfishtacos said:


What country is that? 

Belgium, Flanders to be specific (our educational system is split between 3 regions).



Samus Aran said:
Mmmfishtacos said:
 


What country is that? 

Belgium, Flanders to be specific (our educational system is split between 3 regions)

You are fortunate to come from a country where everyone has access to good and affordable education. Many of us were not that lucky.



the_dengle said:
sc94597 said:

Tell that to people in the nursing and IT fields.

I didn't know the average American was a nurse. I guess you learn something new every day.

I took "average" to mean normal, everyday people, otherwise it is nonsensical. No degree does anyrhing for the average person, because most people arent XYZ. Also nurses make up a sizable portion of the middle-class workforce. Healthcare is currently the largest sector of the U.S economy, and that includes nurses, office clerks, etc all positions that only really require associate's degrees for entry level positions. Another large subset of the middle class economy is IT and tech, which also have jobs available for people with associate's degrees. 

Both of these degrees have people working with higher median salaries than many, many lesser demanded bachelor's degrees in over saturated fields.



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Samus Aran said:
sc94597 said:
 

Yet you believe that people without degrees are less than people with degrees and should not vote. Quite socially egalitarian there.

In my country pretty much everyone has the opportunity to study. So if people don't use that opportunity then that is their fault.

 

Is study the be all, end all for all people though? What if somebody wants to become a skilled laborer (electrician, plumber, specialised painter, carpenter, etc) or want to start their own business? Not everybody needs or wants higher education, and it isn't the only way to make a good living.



Protendo said:


I don't even....

Yeah, sorry, I don't live by the notion that everybody is equal as that is simply not true.

I'd much rather have educated and well informed people vote that are interested in this country's wellbeing. I don't consider myself one of those (I don't particularly care about politics), so I always vote blanco. I'm not going to vote for a political party without researching everything and I simply don't have the time nor interest in doing that. I once read a study that people without a degree are more easily convinced by one-liners and the like (study was only about Belgium though).



sc94597 said:
Samus Aran said:
sc94597 said:
 

Yet you believe that people without degrees are less than people with degrees and should not vote. Quite socially egalitarian there.

In my country pretty much everyone has the opportunity to study. So if people don't use that opportunity then that is their fault.

 

Is study the be all, end all for all people though? What if somebody wants to become a skilled laborer (electrician, plumber, specialised painter, carpenter, etc) or want to start their own business? Not everybody needs or wants higher education, and it isn't the only way to make a good living.

We're not talking about making a good living though, we're talking about who should decide who is in power.

I know people who never went to college and made more money than my first job (though I had a lot more options to get promotion). I respect anyone regardless of their education, but I firmly believe voting should be a privilege and not a given right to everyone.

Granted, the US has too many problems to implement this (high education cost, unequal living conditions for black people, hispanics (?), etc.)



JWeinCom said:
I have mixed feelings on this. On the one hand, I'm pulling for Sanders so far. Sanders is a hard sell being a self proclaimed socialist. Kudos for the honesty, but that's a tough sell. I'm not sure he could win against someone like Jeb Bush who is moderate enough to pull some votes from democratic parties. Sanders would need to run against a more polarizing figure to have a real chance.


What an odd appeal to the American left. I am not an American but I briefed myself on his policies and to me he seems more like a bizarre social democrat, nothing special in any case. A bit of a stretch for him to claim he is a socialist but who am I to stop him. I think these labels have lost their meanings and are now just buzzwords to appeal to certain voterbases.



Samus Aran said:
Protendo said:
 


I don't even....

Yeah, sorry, I don't live by the notion that everybody is equal as that is simply not true.

I'd much rather have educated and well informed people vote that are interested in this country's wellbeing. I don't consider myself one of those (I don't particularly care about politics), so I always vote blanco. I'm not going to vote for a political party without researching everything and I simply don't have the time nor interest in doing that. I once read a study that people without a degree are more easily convinced by one-liners and the like (study was only about Belgium though).

At least I have a greater impact by your standards....