Forums - Nintendo Discussion - Wii/Revolution - 3 Years Later

wyvers said:
bardicverse said:

...

2. Motion controls. The Wii brought about a rebirth of motion control gaming to the industry. How developers have used it is irrelevant, but those who incorporated it well have been paid hansomely for their efforts. Furthermore, the Wii "fad" of motion controls has forced the hand of its competitors to make their own ventures into motion controls for 2010.

 

...

 

How so?

Most of the "games" using motion control belong more into the category of fitness trainers.

The biggest Wii title this year, NSMB Wii, uses  no motion control at all. The Sixasis is capable of shaking and tilting.

The Wii still has not fullfilled what it promised, bringing motion control into games.

Now what the next year brings we have to see, because it gets competition in motion control and perhaps we see some good motion games on one of the consoles, encouraged through competiton.

Play Resident Evil 4 on your choice - GameCube or PS2, then play the Wii version. The game feels like it was MEANT for the Wii motion controls. Simply amazing. 

Honestly, without thinking you're trolling, I can't understand your line about most of the games fitting into fitness category, as most of the FPS games are intuitive with the Wii controls (Metroid Prime 3, Medal of Honor 2, COD WAW, COD MW1) as are a good share of adventure games out there, like the new Silent Hill game.

There already is quite a list of well-done motion control games on the Wii, and with the WM+, it now can do 1:1 true motion. Denying the Wii for innovation through motion controls is not only absurd, but quite ignorant. Every person in the industry realizes this and has acknowledged it by this point.



Around the Network
bardicverse said:

The revolution goes well beyond sales, here's a few main points:

1. The dawn of fitness gaming. Wii Fit, EA Active, etc have sold millions of copies, overshadowing major gaming staples like the recent offerings from Grand Theft Auto series. Physical therapists, gyms, etc are putting Wii systems in their businesses for the fitness games and motor skill games like Wii Sports. This is a previously uncharted ground for the game industry.

2. Motion controls. The Wii brought about a rebirth of motion control gaming to the industry. How developers have used it is irrelevant, but those who incorporated it well have been paid hansomely for their efforts. Furthermore, the Wii "fad" of motion controls has forced the hand of its competitors to make their own ventures into motion controls for 2010.

3. Putting the familiy back together through gaming. Since the days of Atari 2600, gaming had slowy become more of a "one machine, one person" system, especially seen in force by the birth of the Sony PlayStation. More solitary game design, then the incorporation of online gaming, all made gaming a very solitary, if not obsessive, activity. The Wii has brought the family together, focusing on games that the whole family can learn easily, catering to "party gaming" and so forth.

4. Gameplay, not graphics. The industry as a whole had been growing a bloodlust for prettier graphics, but the same rehashed product underneath. With the Wii's graphical limitations, developers spent more time focusing on the game itself, and less concentration on the graphics. This has changed the way developers think and approach their game design, for the Wii and beyond it.

I'd say it's been quite a revolution from the industry we knew in the times before the Wii.

 

Wow, how much does Nintendo pay you to post stuff like this? Each point honestly reads like something straight out of Nintendo PR.



Demon's Souls Official Thread  | Currently playing: Left 4 Dead 2, LittleBigPlanet 2, Magicka

ameratsu said:
bardicverse said:

The revolution goes well beyond sales, here's a few main points:

1. The dawn of fitness gaming. Wii Fit, EA Active, etc have sold millions of copies, overshadowing major gaming staples like the recent offerings from Grand Theft Auto series. Physical therapists, gyms, etc are putting Wii systems in their businesses for the fitness games and motor skill games like Wii Sports. This is a previously uncharted ground for the game industry.

2. Motion controls. The Wii brought about a rebirth of motion control gaming to the industry. How developers have used it is irrelevant, but those who incorporated it well have been paid hansomely for their efforts. Furthermore, the Wii "fad" of motion controls has forced the hand of its competitors to make their own ventures into motion controls for 2010.

3. Putting the familiy back together through gaming. Since the days of Atari 2600, gaming had slowy become more of a "one machine, one person" system, especially seen in force by the birth of the Sony PlayStation. More solitary game design, then the incorporation of online gaming, all made gaming a very solitary, if not obsessive, activity. The Wii has brought the family together, focusing on games that the whole family can learn easily, catering to "party gaming" and so forth.

4. Gameplay, not graphics. The industry as a whole had been growing a bloodlust for prettier graphics, but the same rehashed product underneath. With the Wii's graphical limitations, developers spent more time focusing on the game itself, and less concentration on the graphics. This has changed the way developers think and approach their game design, for the Wii and beyond it.

I'd say it's been quite a revolution from the industry we knew in the times before the Wii.

 

Wow, how much does Nintendo pay you to post stuff like this? Each point honestly reads like something straight out of Nintendo PR.

This is just simple industry viewpoint, the above reasons are standard fare for why developers bring their games to the Wii.

All of it is truth. I invite you to try to refute any point without looking like a crazy fanboy. You'll find it quite impossibe, as there's a large arsenal of proof that back up each point I made.

 



the revolution was successfully invading fitness and board game sectors (which Wii fans refer to as "blue ocean", or "new markets" although these have way more competition than the traditional video games market and are way older to boot)



Lolcislaw said:
mike_intellivision said:
The Wii shook up the industry.

It got more and different people to buy consoles. It got more and different people to play games. That is the revolution.

Last generation, Nintendo sold 21M WW out 178M units (approximate numbers using VGC data). So it less than a 12% market share. Right now, the Wii is at a low-point with a 48.5% market share with 58M units sold. That is 4x market share and 2.5+x sales (With a total market size that is less than three-quarters the previous total market size).

Plus, Ninetendo has only had to cut Wii prices by 20% while PS3 and Xbox 360 prices are down 40%-50%.

Also, no one believed in motion control before the Wii. -- but now MS and Sony are trying to bring it to their consoles.

Finally, a lot of former gamers are gamers again. Look at me for example. They would not have bought any other console than the Wii. So the market size really shrinks if Nintendo does not step in.

Mike from Morgantown

Completely Agree, people might not like the Wii but it did change the industry forever, it took it in different direction it opened it for the new customers.

Yea, I'll completely agree with this too.   I didn't own a console since Colecovision and although my son had N64,GC,PS2 I rarely played on them (expect to play with him).   Wii brought me and a couple of my friends back into console gaming and I know a lot of women with Wiis too.



 

Around the Network

The Revolution is still in its begining and the Wii leads in sales and how people play games.  Not only did the Wii get you doing sports games more realisticly than any other console it got people "NEW" gamers gaming like never before.  The success of the Wii was so Fast and Furious that even Nintendo cant keep up with thier own created Revolution.  Hard core and people wishing to join gaming went out and purchased the "Ever" popular Wii Fit.  Staying in shape and gaming longer. Who Knew?  At least Nintendo put it out there and BOOM!!  Look what happened.  Now the Revolution my not be moving at a fast enough pace to keep Hardcore, core, franchised and new gamer satisfied but its still happening.  With Nintendo leading this Revolution all other "wanna be" console makers are trying to play catch up with wands and camera controls.  They wont have the established franchises with motion plus to even enterest me (though some games may).  Wii is where its at!!  Even without advertising the many uses like Internet, weater channel, News channel, Wii ware games, Virtual console and download content to The number one selling console this gen (DS) ".  The Nintendo Wii is leading this generation of gamers old and new, Core and Hardcore, Established frachised or new Ip.  in a derection (immersion), that I as a gamer enjoy.  Thanks Nintendo.  Vi va LaRevolution!!!



bardicverse said:

The revolution goes well beyond sales, here's a few main points:

1. The dawn of fitness gaming. Wii Fit, EA Active, etc have sold millions of copies, overshadowing major gaming staples like the recent offerings from Grand Theft Auto series. Physical therapists, gyms, etc are putting Wii systems in their businesses for the fitness games and motor skill games like Wii Sports. This is a previously uncharted ground for the game industry.

2. Motion controls. The Wii brought about a rebirth of motion control gaming to the industry. How developers have used it is irrelevant, but those who incorporated it well have been paid hansomely for their efforts. Furthermore, the Wii "fad" of motion controls has forced the hand of its competitors to make their own ventures into motion controls for 2010.

3. Putting the familiy back together through gaming. Since the days of Atari 2600, gaming had slowy become more of a "one machine, one person" system, especially seen in force by the birth of the Sony PlayStation. More solitary game design, then the incorporation of online gaming, all made gaming a very solitary, if not obsessive, activity. The Wii has brought the family together, focusing on games that the whole family can learn easily, catering to "party gaming" and so forth.

4. Gameplay, not graphics. The industry as a whole had been growing a bloodlust for prettier graphics, but the same rehashed product underneath. With the Wii's graphical limitations, developers spent more time focusing on the game itself, and less concentration on the graphics. This has changed the way developers think and approach their game design, for the Wii and beyond it.

I'd say it's been quite a revolution from the industry we knew in the times before the Wii.

I agree wholeheartedly with points 1 & 2, and I somewhat agree with point #4, but only in that this gen has shown that graphics don't really matter, and not that gameplay is suddenly more important than it was before.  Other than that, I believe you're overstating Nintendo's actions this gen somewhat.

The ps3/360 were definitely pushing the graphics as much as possible, but there are countless titles on the two systems that provide new gaming experiences, and aren't just rehased titles with a new coat of paint.   There was nothing quite like Assassin's Creed on the market when it released, Gears of War made the cover system a staple of modern shooters, LittleBigPlanet brings numerous new ideas to the table, Demon's Souls is the most unique RPG in years, and don't even get me started on all the quirky and different PSN/XBL tiles out there, like Flower, the Pixeljunk games, Geometry Wars, Braid, etc.  The Wii didn't inspire these developers to provide great gameplay in their titles.  Any decent developer knows gameplay is a vital part of any game. 

All the Wii has done is show that graphics aren't a vital part of the equation, as you can get by solely on great gameplay.  But then, numerous PSN/XBL titles have done this as well.

And honestly, outside of the Wii Sports series and its numerous clones, please show me the great strides in gameplay developers have made as a result of the Wii.  Was it Super Mario Galaxy, that plays eerily similar to Super Mario 64?  Was it Super Smash Bros. Brawl, that is best played with a GameCube controller?  Was it new Super Mario Bros. Wii, that is played like any other 2D Mario?  Was it Punch Out, which plays identical to the original?  Was it Monster Hunter 3, which is sold bundled with the Classic Controller?  Was it the numerous shooters on Wii, that do their best to mimic PC or arcade controls?  Sports games and racers are really the only genres I've seen that have truly benefited from the Wii Remote thus far (though I'm sure Zelda Wii will shake up the action genre in ways games like No More Heroes could only dream of).

As for point #3, social gaming has always been Nintendo's forte.  They have pushed four player multiplayer games for three gens now, with franchises like Mario Kart, Super Smash Bros., and Mario Party.  This gen is no different.  It's just that with the success of the Wii due to the popularity of the Wii Remote, they have a better position from which to market the social gaming scene.  This wasn't a revolution.  These ideas have been around (and quite popular, looking at the sales of past Nintendo titles) for years now.  And the other consoles aren't devoid of good offline multiplayer games.  Halo built it's success partly because of four player offline coop and lan parties, and LittleBigPlanet is an amazing multiplayer game, one I enjoy with my nieces and nephew regularly.



I think Nintendo has done an okay job supporting their innovative console. Though I believe they could have done much better.



It depends on how you define revolution.

The way I think Nintendo defined it was this. And after you read this it will probably make most sense to you too, I think.

In the card game of President there's a move where you present four cards of the same value, this will create a "Revolution". This reverses the value of all cards, whereas before a A was considered a strong card now it's one of the weakest. And a 3 which was the weakest before, is now the strongest card.

The idea is that, when you're driving to overthrow an evil dictatoship. Which is what Sony was doing in terms of technology, dictating Blu ray etc, the movement turns all values upside down. Being the person in power dictating with huge funding is no longer a strong point, in "Revolution" being the alternative is much more benefitial. In this sense, Nintendo was successful and I think they never really quite aimed to do anything else.

"Revolution" is when you take objectives and reverse all values by including new perspectives. People's aims become different as they look for new uses for their hobbies.



^^^ agree, good analogy