Forums - Gaming Discussion - You Failed SEGA - great advertorial by IGN

disolitude said:
famousringo said:
The fundamental flaw in this article is the assumption that gamers owe Sega for some reason. They really don't. It isn't the customer's fault that s/he isn't interested in the bait Sega is dangling before them.

I think the author is actually trying to say, "You failed me by not buying the Sega games I wanted you to buy." Why does he think other people have a duty to support his cause?

There are many kinds of games I would like to see made, and genres I'd like to see revived, but I know that I'm only one consumer, and I can only vote with my own voice and my own wallet. Chastising other people for not wanting what I want isn't going to make my dreams come true.

Well the argument behind your argument here is that a lot of gamers complain about lack of innovation and new interesting experiences. I think this article is directed at them.

Its like...fans say things like "Boo...why is dead space a rail shooter on the wii...why can't they do something cool and original...booo"

Well its because the 3rd person action game did not really burn up the charts on ps360 and its cheaper to do a rail shooter then risk another high budget flop. Also, the fact that rail shooters on the wii do very well is another bonus...

I don't think gamers owed anything to Sega...but they are guilty in having sega become another run of the mill type of publisher. 

And this isn't jsut for hardcore gaming. Lets see if "Lets Tap" does well on the wii...seems like another original and fun game idea by Yuji Naka, Sonic the Hedgehog programmer and co-creator. Sega funded his studio and I believe is publishing his game. If it fails, sega will have another shitty sonic ready for the masses very fast... Cut, fold, paste...next!

Perhaps I was allowing the title to colour my impression of the article too much. It does sound rather accusatory.

There's certainly plenty of evidence that gamers shy away from the unfamiliar. EA and Activision's current fortunes are a good demonstration of that. I don't think Dead Space: Extraction is a good example, though, because many of the complaints stem from EA trying to do something different with the franchise on Wii. People aren't just angry because it's a rail shooter, they're angry because it's deviating from the established gameplay of the IP. Extraction was under development long before the original Dead Space got its tepid reception in the market, so I don't think that impacted their decision on how they'd make Dead Space for Wii.



"The worst part about these reviews is they are [subjective]--and their scores often depend on how drunk you got the media at a Street Fighter event."  — Mona Hamilton, Capcom Senior VP of Marketing
*Image indefinitely borrowed from BrainBoxLtd without his consent.

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theRepublic said:

I bring this up now specifically because of the economic climate. In 2001, there was an assumption that videogames were recession-proof. After the last six months of heartbreaking stories about studio closures, we know that's not true.

This is just wrong.  The video game idustry had record revenues in 2008.  If it was the recession that was the problem, revenue would be down.

Inflation suggests that revenues will always trend upwards - and this is worth taking into account. While this recession has largely affected the industry through the financial side, borrowing costs are up for example and naturally they are not accounted for by revenues.

The idea that videogames are recession-proof is quite frankly absurd.

 



 
Debating with fanboys, its not
all that dissimilar to banging ones
head against a wall 

Developers went under because the market was over saturated and they were too leveraged with debt, not because of the recession.

And Mirror's edge didn't sell well but Left 4 dead, Assassin's creed, Little Big Planet, Wii sport/play/fit, Gears, Resistance and so many other new IPs have sold extremely well this generation.

This article is poorly researched.



a new jet set radio i think would sell like crap



hello how are you.

Picko said:
theRepublic said:

I bring this up now specifically because of the economic climate. In 2001, there was an assumption that videogames were recession-proof. After the last six months of heartbreaking stories about studio closures, we know that's not true.

This is just wrong.  The video game idustry had record revenues in 2008.  If it was the recession that was the problem, revenue would be down.

Inflation suggests that revenues will always trend upwards - and this is worth taking into account. While this recession has largely affected the industry through the financial side, borrowing costs are up for example and naturally they are not accounted for by revenues.

The idea that videogames are recession-proof is quite frankly absurd.

 

 

Video game revenues have been rising far faster than the pace of inflation. They've been running between 10% and 20% in recent years, including 13% last year in the US according to NPD, despite the looming recession.

"Recession-proof" might be a misleadingly strong term, but the sales data we've seen this year so far doesn't suggest that the games market is slowing, except perhaps in Japan. Some publishers are in trouble, and the you're right that the credit crunch is affecting how they deal with necessary restructuring, but the recession hasn't itself been the root cause of their problems.



"The worst part about these reviews is they are [subjective]--and their scores often depend on how drunk you got the media at a Street Fighter event."  — Mona Hamilton, Capcom Senior VP of Marketing
*Image indefinitely borrowed from BrainBoxLtd without his consent.

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SEGA!!!


Sega forever.



Jackson50 said:
I did not fail Sega. I supported them. Quit blaming me!!!

^


Also, I'd have to agree with everyone that pointed out the problem in blaming the masses for this. The market for games like Jet Grind Radio just isn't big, gamers need to accept that fact. People simply buy the games they like. While Mirror's Edge looks attractive to me, it seems to have too many problems to warrant my purchase (only worth a rent). I'm not going to buy it just to contribute to this "creativity toll."



famousringo said:
Picko said:
theRepublic said:

I bring this up now specifically because of the economic climate. In 2001, there was an assumption that videogames were recession-proof. After the last six months of heartbreaking stories about studio closures, we know that's not true.

This is just wrong.  The video game idustry had record revenues in 2008.  If it was the recession that was the problem, revenue would be down.

Inflation suggests that revenues will always trend upwards - and this is worth taking into account. While this recession has largely affected the industry through the financial side, borrowing costs are up for example and naturally they are not accounted for by revenues.

The idea that videogames are recession-proof is quite frankly absurd.

 

 

Video game revenues have been rising far faster than the pace of inflation. They've been running between 10% and 20% in recent years, including 13% last year in the US according to NPD, despite the looming recession.

"Recession-proof" might be a misleadingly strong term, but the sales data we've seen this year so far doesn't suggest that the games market is slowing, except perhaps in Japan. Some publishers are in trouble, and the you're right that the credit crunch is affecting how they deal with necessary restructuring, but the recession hasn't itself been the root cause of their problems.

 

Videogame inflation is probably much higher however, particularly considering that the average game is now a higher price than it was in 2007. It is likely that a significant proportion of the rise in revenues can be explained by increased sales of both Xbox 360 and PS3 games. Of its own, this isn't a bad development, afterall revenues are increasing at a faster pace than economy wide inflation. However, the price change is not an exogenous development - it came as a response to higher funding costs, which have continued to rise as financial conditions have deteriorated. We cannot say anything about the health of the videogame industry without looking at the cost side - particularly in this economic climate.



 
Debating with fanboys, its not
all that dissimilar to banging ones
head against a wall 

Well, i had a Sega megadrive and around 60 games for it

a Sega saturn and close to 40 games for it.

and a Sega dreamcast and over 60 games for it.

I tried Sega, i really did.

Its a shame that fantastic games like Shenmue and Jet set radio are now becoming distant memories



Ronster316 said:
Well, i had a Sega megadrive and around 60 games for it

a Sega saturn and close to 40 games for it.

and a Sega dreamcast and over 60 games for it.

I tried Sega, i really did.

Its a shame that fantastic games like Shenmue and Jet set radio are now becoming distant memories

First I jsut want to say that other than when I discovered videogames in 1989, Dreamcast was the funnest time I had with videogames. Almost every game I got for it was a blast... I am guilty in taking that for granted, because it hasnt been the same since.

I think the true tragedy with the dreamcast is that some games just dissapeared without a trace. Atleast people still praise Shenmue and Jet set radio...but games like Headhunter, Gigawing 2, Cannon Spike, Toy Commander, Bangai-O...they almost dissapeared without history making any refference to them what so ever.

For example Headhunter is easily as good as metal gear solid 2 if not better when it comes to gameplay variety, humor and story... but will it ever get the praise? Not even close...

Ikaruga and Rez would be on the list too had we not seen Xbox live versions of those games.Ikaruga and Rez would be on the list too had we not seen Xbox live versions of those games.