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Forums - Movies & TV - Netflix's Bioshock Adaptation to be Directed by Francis Lawrence and Screenplay by Michael Green

Pick your Plasmid and get ready to evolve because the BioShock movie just found its director. Fresh off the teaser trailer for his upcoming Netflix spectacle adventure, Slumberland, Francis Lawrence is joining the film adaptation, and he’s bringing along Logan and Blade Runner 2049 screenwriter Michael Green. The Little Sisters are in good hands.

The original BioShock is more than just a superb first-person shooter game. It’s also a sneakily compelling morality tale, told deep under the surface of the ocean in a creepy underwater city called Rapture. In between blasting through hordes of Splicers, players are able to simply explore the rotting hallways and dilapidated storefronts of an entire mysterious world, meant as an Ayn Rand-inspired fantasyland for a mysterious historical figure. There’s more to discover than simple shotgun blasts — although those shotgun blasts are obviously more than satisfying. It’s no wonder the games have sold a combined 39 million copies worldwide. 

Lawrence is no stranger to dystopia; on top of the three Hunger Games films he directed, he also led Will Smith through the monster-infested New York of I Am Legend. And, of course, his spy thriller Red Sparrow saw him take on another crucial part of BioShock lore: people listening to tapes.

The BioShock Movie Will Be Directed by Francis Lawrence - Netflix Tudum



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Ugh. Bioshock was already a great story told perfectly through the interactive gaming experience itself. It was one of those games brought up when the, "Are games an artform?" question was asked and it was a great example to use as an argument towards the affirmative. Who knows... maybe they'll do a decent job at this but I still feel it's just not needed. I would much rather a ground-up remake of the game itself to happen during the 10th generation or so than this (as long as the voice acting remains untouched).

Some things should be left alone as the medium they were made for, in my opinion.

Last edited by archbrix - on 25 August 2022

archbrix said:

Ugh. Bioshock was already a great story told perfectly through the interactive gaming experience itself. It was one of those games brought up when the, "Are games an artform?" question was asked and it was a great example to use as an argument towards the affirmative. Who knows... maybe they'll do a decent job at this but I still feel it's just not needed. I would much rather a ground-up remake of the game itself to happen during the 10th generation or so than this (as long as the voice acting remains untouched).

Some things should be left alone as the medium they were made for, in my opinion.

Man, I'd love a full blown BioShock remake, now you mention it.

As for this, I'll watch it because I love that first game... but I remain sceptical of all adaptations until they prove themselves (and not just video game-to-movie/tv ones).



Can't wait for people to completely miss the point and think that they're advocating an Ayn Rand wet dream society.



JWeinCom said:

Can't wait for people to completely miss the point and think that they're advocating an Ayn Rand wet dream society.

Yeah, my trust in networks and services having an actual grasp on the source material and its original intents and thematics is at an all-time low. Videogame adaptations rarely, if ever, work well in these formats.



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I feel like the people working on it could do something great based on their combined filmography, so let's see how this goes...



Mummelmann said:
JWeinCom said:

Can't wait for people to completely miss the point and think that they're advocating an Ayn Rand wet dream society.

Yeah, my trust in networks and services having an actual grasp on the source material and its original intents and thematics is at an all-time low. Videogame adaptations rarely, if ever, work well in these formats.

I was more talking about the viewers. I've seen a bunch of people online arguing that Ryan was a true paragon of the free market and Rapture fell because of that wascally Atlas as if Ryan's hypocrisy wasn't the entire point of the game, and the series in general. 

As for a TV series, it could be kind of fun. We never really see Rapture in its prime except for a bit in Burial at sea. The game explores it through old recordings and such, so a prequel could be interesting. Although, I'm not especially optimistic considering the track record of such adaptations.