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Forums - Gaming Discussion - 7 time classic Tetris champ Jonas Neubauer passed away at 38 from sudden medical emergency

Jonas won the Classic Tetris World Championship 7 times since he began his professional Tetris career in 2010. He is survived by his wife, Heather Ito, who herself is a 1 time Dr. Mario champion, winning in 2019. Vince Clemente of the Classic Tetris World Championship team released this statement:

It is with broken hearts we share that Jonas Neubauer, 7-time CTWC champion, passed away suddenly on January 4.

Jonas has been an absolute pillar of positivity and humility to our CTWC family. We could have never asked for a greater champ, role model and friend. He was kind, genuine, hilarious, incredibly talented, and a brilliant ambassador for the game. While he was the biggest final boss he always had the warmest heart. He will live on as a legend to our community and many others around the world.

Jonas, we miss you, we love you, and we thank you for inspiring us to always be our best.

Rest in peace our mighty hero.

Rest in Peace legend.



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It's a scary-ass time to have a medical emergency in many parts of the world. I see he's from Los Angeles. I wonder how much worse this may have made his situation, and if he could have been saved if the health care system there was operating under normal conditions?



- "If you have the heart of a true winner, you can always get more pissed off than some other asshole."

WTF? Jonas? I can't believe it! Damn, he was the face of CTWC, so young too, Heather must be destroyed D:



COKTOE said:

It's a scary-ass time to have a medical emergency in many parts of the world. I see he's from Los Angeles. I wonder how much worse this may have made his situation, and if he could have been saved if the health care system there was operating under normal conditions?

There are essentially zero reports of hospitals rationing care, even in southern CA.  So, theoretically at least, the health care system is still providing normal care for everyone.  



VAMatt said:
COKTOE said:

It's a scary-ass time to have a medical emergency in many parts of the world. I see he's from Los Angeles. I wonder how much worse this may have made his situation, and if he could have been saved if the health care system there was operating under normal conditions?

There are essentially zero reports of hospitals rationing care, even in southern CA.  So, theoretically at least, the health care system is still providing normal care for everyone.  

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2021/01/05/covid-19-california-los-angeles-limit-hospital-transports/4141138001/

"As COVID-19 continues to overwhelm California hospitals, Los Angeles County officials are trying to ration medical supplies and hospital space.

The Los Angeles Emergency Medical Services Agency issued two memos Monday instructing emergency responders to limit the use of supplemental oxygen and not transport patients who cannot be revived in the field.

Same story more or less: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/covid-los-angeles-ambulance-transport-ems/

It seems like a bad time to have a medical emergency in LA.

I only heard about this in passing a few days ago at my mother's place when she had the news on. Is what I heard there, as well as the information in these stories inaccurate?



- "If you have the heart of a true winner, you can always get more pissed off than some other asshole."

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Many people have made this request.  His should be done vertically.



...to avoid getting banned for inactivity, I may have to resort to comments that are of a lower overall quality and or beneath my moral standards.

COKTOE said:
VAMatt said:

There are essentially zero reports of hospitals rationing care, even in southern CA.  So, theoretically at least, the health care system is still providing normal care for everyone.  

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2021/01/05/covid-19-california-los-angeles-limit-hospital-transports/4141138001/

"As COVID-19 continues to overwhelm California hospitals, Los Angeles County officials are trying to ration medical supplies and hospital space.

The Los Angeles Emergency Medical Services Agency issued two memos Monday instructing emergency responders to limit the use of supplemental oxygen and not transport patients who cannot be revived in the field.

Same story more or less: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/covid-los-angeles-ambulance-transport-ems/

It seems like a bad time to have a medical emergency in LA.

I only heard about this in passing a few days ago at my mother's place when she had the news on. Is what I heard there, as well as the information in these stories inaccurate?

Not sure.  I just heard an interview with the administrator of a very large hospital system in California last week, saying that there has been no rationing of care at this point.  I wasn't paying that much attention, as it was just an interview that came on Bloomberg news radio when I was driving. But, I'm nearly certain that's was said. My brother lives in that area, so my ears generally perk up when I hear news related to that region.

Previous to that, a few weeks ago, one of my employees wives was moved to a hospital a couple of hours from his home because of a lack of ICU beds here locally. So, I did a little bit of googling to determine how bad the hospital overcrowding situation is. What I turned up at that time said that there was not a significant problem.

Anyway, I haven't done any scientific research. I'm just relying on anecdotal reports as well.