Forums - Gaming Discussion - Should a $300 Lockhart be counted alongside Series X in marketshare tallies?

Should a $300 Lockhart be counted alongside Series X in marketshare tallies?

Yes, same console different SKUs 62 88.57%
 
No, the power/price difference is too much. 7 10.00%
 
Other 1 1.43%
 
Total:70

So Lockhart is rumored to be $300. Meanwhile both Series X and PS5 are rumored to be $500. Sony has no $300 SKU at all. If these rumors turn out to be true then Lockhart is $200 less than the other two systems. At such a price difference, should it be counted as part of Series X sales, or should it be counted separately? 

Let me put it this way. Let's suppose PS5 sells 120 million units lifetime, and Series X sells 30 million units lifetime, with Lockhart selling another 30 million units. This brings the total gen 9 sales up to 180 million units lifetime. Should this hypothetical scenario be seen as Sony having gained ground against MS or lost ground? 

Last edited by Cerebralbore101 - on 09 August 2020

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Clearly 120,000,000 sales is a dud.



Of course it has to be counted.

As for your other question, you are asking if 120m PS5s sold should be seen as a failure for Sony. That's... mindboggling. With online multiplayer behind a paywall, there's no realistic way to sell 120m units and lose money on the platform.



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RolStoppable said:
Of course it has to be counted.

As for your other question, you are asking if 120m PS5s sold should be seen as a failure for Sony. That's... mindboggling. With online multiplayer behind a paywall, there's no realistic way to sell 120m units and lose money on the platform.

I changed my other question a bit to make it clearer. Thanks. 



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Doesn't PS5 already have a lower priced sku of it's own? Rather ironic you're speculating about things based on rumours of prices and an unannounced system, yet conveniently overlook something that's already confirmed.

Lockhart, whatever it is will still share the same architecture as the Series X, and still be considered a next-gen system. No different to Xbox One X or PS4 Pro from this gen in that respect.

Revenue made on console sale prices matters very little (see: Nintendo profit margins). What matters most is getting your system in people's homes. So yes, Xbox gaining more market share would be worse for Sony and good for Microsoft.



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I don't see why they should be counted separately. PS4 Pro and Xbox One X were counted alongside base PS4 and base XB1, and the power gap between Series S and Series X is reportedly comparable to the power gap between base Xbox One and Xbox One X. Microsoft is moving into a cycle of selling families of consoles instead of a single console. Xbox Series is the name of this upcoming generation of the Xbox family. MS may choose to give us individual sales information for Series S and Series  X, or they may choose to give us sales for the Xbox Series as a whole, or they may give us no official hardware sales numbers at all like they have been doing with Xbox One the past few years. Either way, I see no reason why VGC should track Xbox Series S and Series X separately.

A scenario where MS sells 30m of each seems highly unlikely to me, if XB1 and XB1 X are anything to go by, the cheaper Series S will sell several times as many consoles as the more expensive Series X. 30m Series X sold would honestly be pretty good for MS, as they would probably sell at least twice as many Series S units alongside that, or 90m total. I'm sure MS would be quite pleased with Xbox Series selling 90m compared to PS5 selling 120m, that would be a far better ratio than this gen.

Last edited by shikamaru317 - on 09 August 2020

Shaunodon said:

Doesn't PS5 already have a lower priced sku of it's own? Rather ironic you're speculating about things based on rumours of prices and an unannounced system, yet conveniently overlook something that's already confirmed.

Lockhart, whatever it is will still share the same architecture as the Series X, and still be considered a next-gen system. No different to Xbox One X or PS4 Pro from this gen in that respect.

Revenue made on console sale prices matters very little (see: Nintendo profit margins). What matters most is getting your system in people's homes. So yes, Xbox gaining more market share would be worse for Sony and good for Microsoft.

What is the PS5 lower priced SKU? Are you talking about the diskless PS5? That might be $50 to $100 less than the disc version, and it would still have the same specs as the main PS5. So I don't quite see that as a different system. 



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Why would it be counted differently? It shares the same library Series X, they're one platform. 

Last edited by Otter - on 09 August 2020

It's just a weaker Series X and it seems to be fundamentally the same platform. So the sales ought to be lumped together.
Changing, companies, let's say Nintendo had 2 SKUs at launch for the Switch's successor. One was right around Xbox One performance, or slightly weaker. And then one was super powerful for a hybrid with roughly PS4 Pro specs. They would still be fundamentally the same platform. Both would be replacements for the Switch and have an identical (or 95% identical) library.



Lifetime Sales Predictions 

PS4: 130 mil (was 100 million) Xbox One: 55 mil (was 50 mil) Switch: 110 million (was 73, then 96 million)

3DS: 75.5 mil (was 73, then 77 million)

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Cerebralbore101 said:
Shaunodon said:

Doesn't PS5 already have a lower priced sku of it's own? Rather ironic you're speculating about things based on rumours of prices and an unannounced system, yet conveniently overlook something that's already confirmed.

Lockhart, whatever it is will still share the same architecture as the Series X, and still be considered a next-gen system. No different to Xbox One X or PS4 Pro from this gen in that respect.

Revenue made on console sale prices matters very little (see: Nintendo profit margins). What matters most is getting your system in people's homes. So yes, Xbox gaining more market share would be worse for Sony and good for Microsoft.

What is the PS5 lower priced SKU? Are you talking about the diskless PS5? That might be $50 to $100 less than the disc version, and it would still have the same specs as the main PS5. So I don't quite see that as a different system. 

So why do specs suddenly matter now?

Both your title and OP completely phrased the issue around pricing, stating 'Sony doesn't have a $300 sku', and conveniently ignoring their digital-only system that's already been confirmed, and likely to be $100 cheaper.

So is the magic number $200 less than your competitor? Is that when it becomes unfair, or not equivalent anymore?

As far as we know, Series S or 'Lockhart' will play all the same games as Series X, with the exact same architecture. So outside of some performance sacrifices, it's the same system.

Regardless if it meets your requirements, as long as it helps sell more Xbox systems it'll be a gain for Microsoft.