Forums - Movies Discussion - A Look at Changing Trends at the Domestic Box Office in the Blockbuster Era

https://shadowofthevoid.wordpress.com/2020/05/11/a-night-at-the-movies/

I've finally finished working on a couple of big projects lately. One of them has to do with the movies, specifically the domestic box office since 1975, the year the "Blockbuster Era" of film is generally agreed to have begun. Much like my posts here regarding video game sales analysis, there's a few charts scattered throughout the article (about a dozen). While some of my commentary might involve things that are known to people who follow movies and the state of the box office, as far as I'm aware I'm the first to contextualize the data in chart form in this particular way. I use adjusted figures only to make sure it's as close to an apples-to-apples comparison when looking at how things have changed over the past 45 years.

So, let me know what you all think. I appreciate any constructive criticism regarding readability, flow, etc., and if I overlooked any factual matters, let me know. It's a decently long read at about 10,000 words long, so it may take a while to read through it. I initially planned on publishing this well before now, but decided to hold off on it to get the full data set for the 2010s.

Oh, and I really need to update that header image on my blog. I've never really liked it, but I'm just not all that creative when it comes to art and whatnot. I just kind of threw it together to have something there.



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I skimmed the article.  It looks like it has a lot of interesting information in it.  I find the box office interesting, but I never sat down and looked at the data over several decades.  (I've done this with music and video games.)   

The most interesting chart at a first glance was the one with ticket sales going back to the 40's.  I've heard, at various points, about factors that caused a decline in ticket sales, but it looks like the big one is from the 40's to the 60's.  What the history of cinema/entertainment normally says is that this corresponds with the rise of TV which seems like a logical cause.

I'll see if I can make time to actually read over it.  It looks interesting, but on the other hand it's extremely long.



Also skimmed through it. Pretty good article. Also before the blockbuster era began most movies had longer theater runs and rereleases where a common practice. The Sound of Music which was released just about ten years before Jaws is probably the second most important movie released in the second half of the previous century since it saved 20th Century Fox from going out of business.



I really enjoyed reading your article and even talked about it with my roommate, but I don't really have much to add. I guess maybe you could have devoted a bit of space to the importance of sequels and ongoing series over the past few decades, seeing how you bring them up towards the end, but that could easily be another article in itself.



Love and tolerate.

The_Liquid_Laser said:

I skimmed the article.  It looks like it has a lot of interesting information in it.  I find the box office interesting, but I never sat down and looked at the data over several decades.  (I've done this with music and video games.)   

The most interesting chart at a first glance was the one with ticket sales going back to the 40's.  I've heard, at various points, about factors that caused a decline in ticket sales, but it looks like the big one is from the 40's to the 60's.  What the history of cinema/entertainment normally says is that this corresponds with the rise of TV which seems like a logical cause.

I'll see if I can make time to actually read over it.  It looks interesting, but on the other hand it's extremely long.

It's also worth noting that populations increased, and that might explain the growth in ticket sales from 71 forward. High speed internet is probably what caused the 2003 onward decline. Not NEARLY as heavy a blow as TV.



I describe myself as a little dose of toxic masculinity.