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Forums - Gaming Discussion - Final Fantasy VII Remake, what language are the non-english localizations based on?

So there are rumors that the french and german localizations were done directly from japanese and not from the english version, as it has generally been done in the past (up until Final Fantasy XV, it seems). However, I cannot find any concrete proof that these two languages adapted the japanese version and not the english version.

I'm asking because many people who speak french or german but who choose to play with english voice-overs complain that the french or german subtitles don't match the english voice-overs. Does anyone have any information about this at all? It seems the main french translator lives in Japan and has spoken about translating from japanese in the past, but this is not proof that was the case this time.

What about the other languages, those that did not get voice-overs : korean, chinese, italian, spanish, brazilian portuguese? Which language did they adapt the game from?

Thanks!



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Subtitles not matching the voice over in another language is a common thing.



Yeah, I could see that in the demo. For example, at the very beginning of the game, Jesse asks Cloud if him and Tifa are close, clearly implying a romantic connotation both in the tone she's using and in the italic font of the word "close" in the subtitles. In the spanish version however, she just asks if they are friends, completely changing the original meaning of the conversation.

Examples like this ocurr across the entire game.



The reason I ask is because it would naturally be normal for there to be differences between the english dub and the other localized subtitles if they are all localized from the japanese version. However, because games used to be localized from the english version (so a game would first be localized from japanese to english and then from that english version to the other european languages), many people online expected this to be the case here and accuse the game of having "poorly" translated subs.

However, it would be nice to find some proof that the other languages indeed were localized from the original japanese version and not the english, if only to give proof that they should not expect the subs in other languages to translate the english dub. This is the only site I could find that clearly states both the german and english version were localized directly from japanese :
https://www.gameswelt.ch/final-fantasy-vii-remake/special/die-dir-bestimmt-entgangen-sind-302238/5#disqus_thread



I didn't even know that there would be a portuguese dub because other SE games didn't, but I'm glad if there is.
Also as someone used to dubbed and subbed content because we receive a lot of movies and series from usa and anime from japan, dubbing do a lot more adaptation, localization and synchronism so change the words while sub is more literal.



duduspace11 "Well, since we are estimating costs, Pokemon Red/Blue did cost Nintendo about $50m to make back in 1996"

http://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/post.php?id=8808363

Mr Puggsly: "Hehe, I said good profit. You said big profit. Frankly, not losing money is what I meant by good. Don't get hung up on semantics"

http://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/post.php?id=9008994

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No, the only dubs that were made were for japanese, english, french, and german. Brazilian portuguese and the other languages only got subtitles, though based on the answer of the person who played the spanish subbed version with english voices, it would seem the spanish subs are not based off the english localization.



Rêveur said:
No, the only dubs that were made were for japanese, english, french, and german. Brazilian portuguese and the other languages only got subtitles, though based on the answer of the person who played the spanish subbed version with english voices, it would seem the spanish subs are not based off the english localization.

Ok.

It could very well be, just gave you an explanation of usually dub and sub not matching at least in brazilian versions of stuff. I even watch a lot of stuff with sub and dub on together just to compare the differences. They are actually more different than similar. You would laugh if you saw the titles several movies receive here.



duduspace11 "Well, since we are estimating costs, Pokemon Red/Blue did cost Nintendo about $50m to make back in 1996"

http://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/post.php?id=8808363

Mr Puggsly: "Hehe, I said good profit. You said big profit. Frankly, not losing money is what I meant by good. Don't get hung up on semantics"

http://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/post.php?id=9008994


Vodacixi said:

Yeah, I could see that in the demo. For example, at the very beginning of the game, Jesse asks Cloud if him and Tifa are close, clearly implying a romantic connotation both in the tone she's using and in the italic font of the word "close" in the subtitles. In the spanish version however, she just asks if they are friends, completely changing the original meaning of the conversation.

Examples like this ocurr across the entire game.

So you only played the demo but you somehow know it occurs for the entire game? 



Pinkie_pie said:

Vodacixi said:

Yeah, I could see that in the demo. For example, at the very beginning of the game, Jesse asks Cloud if him and Tifa are close, clearly implying a romantic connotation both in the tone she's using and in the italic font of the word "close" in the subtitles. In the spanish version however, she just asks if they are friends, completely changing the original meaning of the conversation.

Examples like this ocurr across the entire game.

So you only played the demo but you somehow know it occurs for the entire game? 

You talk like what I'm saying is impossible or something. I have friends who have played the game. I commented them this aspect of the demo. And they confirmed to me that this happens all the time in the full game. 

And even in the demo, it happened more thab once. I just recalled that specific moment because it was especially lame.