Forums - Nintendo Discussion - Could Next-Gen Switch Use Nvidia DLSS AI Upscaling?

JRPGfan said:

Its like checkerboarding... its a technique to use less to show more.

Sort of.
The "A.I" does sample multiple frames of information to infer what it looks like at a higher resolution frame.
But it's a completely different approach to the same issue.

JRPGfan said:

Honestly most games that come with a resolution scaleing option (like 1080p, at 70%) + Sharpening filter,
could be near equal or better than DLSS.

Atleast it was like that early on, DLSS isnt magic, its alot of work for little effort.

When DLSS works the way it was intended, the game will look higher resolution.

You are right, it isn't magic, it's using the vast computational capabilities of nVidia's server farms.

JRPGfan said:

DLSS is overrated by far.
Resolution scaleing + sharpening filters beat it, in alot of games.
(without needing games to have additional packages of stuff for games, to use DLSS, or haveing server farms makeing these optimisations)

People need to understand that DLSS has downsides too.
The "deep learning" of the machine determines how things turn out.
Sometimes this manifests in a slight blurr + oil painting effect when you look at things.

Resolution scaling is taking a game and dropping the resolution dynamically based on load in order to retain a fixed framerate on hardware that isn't capable enough to run it natively like consoles or low-end PC GPU's.

DLSS takes a different approach.

It does actually perform a few passes, like Anti-Aliasing and a Sharpening pass, which is why it often gets derided in various circles.

Let's not kid ourselves though, it isn't magic... And it is more impactful the lower in resolution you go, if you are already gaming at 1440P-2160P, it's probably a fairly useless feature unless you really need the extra performance, but at say... 480P and 720P? That is where it starts to get interesting.

JRPGfan said:

People need to understand that DLSS has downsides too.
The "deep learning" of the machine determines how things turn out.
Sometimes this manifests in a slight blurr + oil painting effect when you look at things.

Every rendering technique has a downside... The Blur issue isn't a new one, Console games often employ lower-quality motion blur and anti-aliasing which often results in a pretty soft image... It's more of an issue on the PC, because we typically have avoided that issue entirely due to having the power to run better motion blur and anti-aliasing... So we are more prone to having a whinge if things don't go our way visually.

For something like a Switch device, where a games blur is compounded due to the lower rendering resolution... I see it as a potential for a good uplift in visuals.

But then you have the other issue, those visual improvements will be tied to the servers, thus if they ever get shut down, put behind a pay-wall, then your games will get downgraded visually in the future.

Last edited by Pemalite - on 07 February 2020

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It seems like AMD's RIS (image sharpening) is better than DLSS and has virtually no performance hit, maybe Nvidia will come up with their own answer to that.

But in theory absolutely. If you can render an image at only 60-70% of its pixels but achieve basically the same image quality ... such a tech is perfect for a Switch 2.