Forums - Gaming Discussion - If 5G has 1ms lag then how does anyone apart from Nintendo survive?

Graphics won't matter so Nintendo instantly becomes a high end console.

Dedicated gaming devices might still be used even if it's just for controllers and convenience.

Nintendo seems fine for now because they've successfully predicted the future again.

DS embraced touchscreen and microphone games that were about to become huge thanks to Apple/Android. (DSi added a camera)

Wii was a TV-box with a TV remote as a controller, the market didn't go that way but most new TVs are smart TVs and therefore could easily become consoles. Every TV manufacturer could install their own Wii Sports if they have motion control in the remote.

3DS used multiple cameras and motion control because that's what smartphones were about to come with as standard.

WiiU thought multiple devices would be connected and would allow for streaming, extra screen(s) and asymmetric gameplay. They do but no-one takes advantage of it.

Switch is a 'tablet' (does the Gameboy count as a tablet?) built around a selection of blutooth controllers and TV docking which is one of the future battlegrounds if 5G is as fast and stable enough as promised and/or when the graphics difference shrinks.

Nintendo has and is successfully defending itself against smart devices. Smartphones, tablets, smart TVs, TV boxes. If 5G makes every device a PS6 level graphics beast then the war will be about exclusive software, controllers, friends lists/online, maybe the ability to easily switch between TV and portable, price, simplicity/accessibility, gimmicky addons, local multiplayer.

Sony and MS lose all (except online) their strengths while Nintendo's are magnified.

If we all wake up tomorrow and every $30 Android device can seamlessly stream PS6 level graphics with zero lag and zero cost to porting, who wins the console war?



Nov 2016 - NES outsells PS1 (JP)

Don't Play Stationary 4 ever. Switch!

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Isn't the only reason there is little lag because they will do input prediction? If so that's bad. But if they can pull off no lag without input prediction, and literally any device can play any games, then yes I agree that Nintendo will slaughter the other two if these were the Microsoft and Sony from a generation or two ago. However, they have probably noticed this and that is why they are both buying up a lot of studios to have more first party games.



Classic pyro thread.



Lag is not the only thing handicapping game streaming though. You're forgetting that mobile internet has really tiny data caps. Streaming just 2 hours of games per day will put you at 900 GB of data usage at the end of the month on Goodle's Stadia. Verizon, the 2nd largest phone company in the US, has a so called "unlimited plan", but it costs a whopping $90 a month, and you only get the first 75 GB at 5G speed, after that you get capped to 4G speed. AT&T, the largest, is also $90 a month, but they start capping your speed after you've used 22 GB of data. 

Last edited by shikamaru317 - on 10 November 2019

Air latency is not the same thing as end to end latency. Even late 3G networks already had theoretical air latencies below 5 ms earlier this decade. Speed of light and server lag are a thing even with 5G, you know.

Besides, I'm not sure precisely which point you're trying to make about Nintendo since none of the devices you mentioned have anything to do with 5G whatsoever. Not to mention a putative streaming future still depends on companies with the funding, infrastructure and know-how available to provide this service. Microsoft and Sony do... and Nintendon't.



 

 

 

 

 

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My mom got her first smartphone last month but being elderly on a limited budget she got a track phone. She bout a 500MB data card and the updates and shit ate all her data in a week even tho she was on wifi. Sure most people playing games don't have a tracphone but some of us do. Then even on big networks like Verizon the monthly cost and data caps. When I want to watch a video or listen to music pn my phone it's locally stored to avoid caps.



Bite my shiny metal Cockpit!

You assume that 5G is used to compete against home consoles but have you ever thought that it can be used to also augment ownership of those said systems ?

5G alone won't bring you any gaming value, it only brings you data value which could be potentially used for streaming content. 5G is arguably more of a threat to Nintendo since potential customers can get a superior experience by streaming their games from their home systems (whether it'd be from consoles or not) to their portable devices over the 5G networks ...

Think about it, you only have to carry a single portable 5G device while you don't have to carry any other system including the Switch for high-end gaming purposes ... 

If home consoles are obsoleted by 5G then so is Nintendo as well ... (unless they were designing 5G modems/RF modules like Samsung, Huawei, or Qualcomm were too to have 5G capable devices)



Nintendo will be 3rd party before I even finish typing this post.



shikamaru317 said:

Lag is not the only thing handicapping game streaming though. You're forgetting that mobile internet has really tiny data caps. Streaming just 2 hours of games per day will put you at 900 GB of data usage at the end of the month on Goodle's Stadia. Verizon, the 2nd largest phone company in the US, has a so called "unlimited plan", but it costs a whopping $90 a month, and you only get the first 75 GB at 5G speed, after that you get capped to 4G speed. AT&T, the largest, is also $90 a month, but they start capping your speed after you've used 22 GB of data. 

ehh.. while I agree with your point concerning data caps, the bolded is not accurate

 if the max bandwith they send (4K60) is 35Mbps, then the average bandwith is much lower than that and so is the data useage



Lafiel said:
shikamaru317 said:

Lag is not the only thing handicapping game streaming though. You're forgetting that mobile internet has really tiny data caps. Streaming just 2 hours of games per day will put you at 900 GB of data usage at the end of the month on Goodle's Stadia. Verizon, the 2nd largest phone company in the US, has a so called "unlimited plan", but it costs a whopping $90 a month, and you only get the first 75 GB at 5G speed, after that you get capped to 4G speed. AT&T, the largest, is also $90 a month, but they start capping your speed after you've used 22 GB of data. 

ehh.. while I agree with your point concerning data caps, the bolded is not accurate

 if the max bandwith they send (4K60) is 35Mbps, then the average bandwith is much lower than that and so is the data useage

I got it from this:

https://www.businessinsider.com/google-stadia-data-usage-internet-streaming-requirements-2019-6

4K streaming on Stadia use 15 GB of data an hour. Even Stadia's lowest quality uses 4.5 GB an hour, which works out to 270 GB of data usage for the month at 2 hours per day, still well over the point where mobile companies start capping the speed on your "unlimited data" plan, and the lowest quality setting on Stadia is going to look like a 720p Youtube video with heavy artifacting, far from ideal. MS is claiming lower data usage requirements for their xCloud service, but it will still be well over that unlimited data speed cap point for your average core gamer. Streaming is just not going to replace traditional hardware for core gamers anytime soon. Might work for casuals who only play a few hours a week, but not for core gamers as long as the data caps are so tiny. Even on home internet, the largest ISP in the US, Comcast, has a 1 TB cap, which a core gamer could easily go over between game streaming and video streaming.