Forums - Movies Discussion - New War of the Worlds TV adaption

War of the Worlds has been one of my favourite books of all time since I was a kid, and while I did enjoy both the Hollywood movie interpretations, neither were really faithful adaptions; both changed the setting to contemporary America, and a lot of keys scenes and characters were changed for the worse and/or omitted, including two of my favourites, the Thunderchild fight and the climax.

It's too early to say for sure, but the fact this one appears to be set in turn-of-the-century England is a promising sign that it could be a truly faithful screen adaption at last. I'm cautiously optimistic.



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Looks really good. WotW is easily my second favorite classic sci-fi novel, but it really has never been properly adapted. I remember hearing about this almost a year ago. Very glad it’s going to come out.



0331 Happiness is a belt-fed weapon

I remember watching old one form 50s on TV as a kid and liking it, but honestly, haven't seen it since then. Didn't care for Spielberg's version much, though it was not so bad. This one looks pretty good in traler.

Of course, for my taste, all adaptations should have this soundtrack, in one form or the other:



Finally, BBC should do a faithful adaption as best they can. The design of the Tripods looks good.



Hmm, pie.

HoloDust said:

I remember watching old one form 50s on TV as a kid and liking it, but honestly, haven't seen it since then. Didn't care for Spielberg's version much, though it was not so bad. This one looks pretty good in traler.

Of course, for my taste, all adaptations should have this soundtrack, in one form or the other:

Ah yes, the Jeff Wayne 70s awesome musical version; to this day my favourite version of the story outside of the book! This was actually my first introduction to the IP as a small kid, gave me nightmares, but left me absolutely fascinated, and as soon as I could find the novel I pounced on it.

An ideal War of the Worlds film for me would be basically an adaption of this version haha



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There have been very few fictional novels that I liked, but WotW was one of them. Good to see them doing a proper period piece set around the dawn of the 20th century, just like the book. By moving the setting to the 50s and then to the 00s, the film adaptations had to change the Martians' technology a lot. In the book, the Martian Fighting Machines were tough, but not invincible. The British military did manage to take down several Fighting Machines, though it wasn't easy. The Fighting Machines as described in the book would have been annihilated by a modern post-WW2 military force, so the films needed to give them invincible force fields, meaning no "hope spots" like the battle with the HMS Thunderchild (even a nuke failed in the George Pal film). The films also excised the Martian "black smoke," one of the first, if not the first, portrayals of modern chemical warfare in fiction.



Shadow1980 said:
There have been very few fictional novels that I liked, but WotW was one of them. Good to see them doing a proper period piece set around the dawn of the 20th century, just like the book. By moving the setting to the 50s and then to the 00s, the film adaptations had to change the Martians' technology a lot. In the book, the Martian Fighting Machines were tough, but not invincible. The British military did manage to take down several Fighting Machines, though it wasn't easy. The Fighting Machines as described in the book would have been annihilated by a modern post-WW2 military force, so the films needed to give them invincible force fields, meaning no "hope spots" like the battle with the HMS Thunderchild (even a nuke failed in the George Pal film). The films also excised the Martian "black smoke," one of the first, if not the first, portrayals of modern chemical warfare in fiction.

I feel pretty much exactly the same; in the book, one of the greatest moments is when the Thunderchild attacks the Martian fighting machines and manages to take one down, giving a burst of hope, which is then dashed when the remaining machines obliterate the warship.

The films never quite got the ending right either; the last dying Martians howling out to each other over the dead city of London in the book and the main character finally deciding to end it all and marching up to one of the machines only to see birds feasting on its dead pilot is just so much more impactful than the way the films did it.

Also, the series finally has an air date; the 17th of this month on BBC. Hopefully that means it can be viewed online on BBC iPlayer for those of us outside Britain.

Last edited by curl-6 - on 06 November 2019

My only exposure to War Of The Worlds is the 2005 movie that had the Space Pope in the leading role. I mostly liked it, but felt then ending was a bit of a cop-out.



Chinese food for breakfast

 

Okay, so episode one is live.

It's the most faithful major adaption yet. That said, it still does make some kinda pointless changes to certain scenes from the book, like the first time the heat ray is used; it's well directed, but conceptually the way its done feels a bit gimmicky. Still, it comes closer than either Hollywood adaption.

I really liked Eleanor Tomlinson as the female lead. Acting in general was good, no cheesy or poor performances.

It's a bit hard to judge based on the first episode alone as its mostly focused on establishing the setup. Parts two and three will make or break it.



Just finished part 2, and it was a big step up from the rather slow-moving intro.

Excellent performances, score, and direction. And best of all, they FINALLY committed one of the best scenes of the book to the screen; the engagement between a Martian machine and a pre-dreadnaught battleship.

Very impressed at this point; so long as it doesn't end on a sour note, this should easily stand as the best screen adaption of the material to date.