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Forums - General Discussion - Fourth of July

If there's one thing that I think is better about going to school in the USA than Canada, it's that American history is way more interesting. I'm curious if the rest of the world considers the American War of Independence a big deal.

Last edited by HomokHarcos - on 05 July 2018

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Nope, it's not even slightly a big deal here in the UK. The Falklands War even gets more recognition than the US independence war.



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Not really no. I mean everyone knows 4th of July is independence day, and you do see some American festivities here and there but it's not that big a deal here in the UK and even a lesser deal in other countries



Not really. I study history, but we almost completely skipped the American independence. After its independence, the US was still a small country with only a few million people, and no economic importance. The only reason why it got mentioned, was because it influenced the French revolution.



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Ka-pi96 said:
Nope, it's not even slightly a big deal here in the UK. The Falklands War even gets more recognition than the US independence war.

I wouldnt think it would be, it was a war they lost.

 

It is an amazing story. how people who were tired of oppression of the king of England, made a new country out of colonies and eventually won a war again t the biggest superpower of the time. the struggles of the people involved, no one today could do what they did.

 

personally i find it funny to study political adversaries from that time, after the war. starting with John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.

 

Jefferson's camp accused President Adams of having a "hideous hermaphroditical character, which has neither the force and firmness of a man, nor the gentleness and sensibility of a woman."

In return, Adams' men called Vice President Jefferson "a mean-spirited, low-lived fellow, the son of a half-breed Indian squaw, sired by a Virginia mulatto father."

As the slurs piled on, Adams was labeled a fool, a hypocrite, a criminal, and a tyrant, while Jefferson was branded a weakling, an atheist, a libertine, and a coward.

 

source

 

 

Last edited by LiquorandGunFun - on 05 July 2018

 

LiquorandGunFun said:
Ka-pi96 said:
Nope, it's not even slightly a big deal here in the UK. The Falklands War even gets more recognition than the US independence war.

I wouldnt think it would be, it was a war they lost.

 

It is an amazing story. how people who were tired of oppression of the king of England, made a new country out of colonies and eventually won a war again t the biggest superpower of the time. the struggles of the people involved, no one today could do what they did.

 

personally i find it funny to study political adversaries from that time, after the war. starting with John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.

 

Jefferson's camp accused President Adams of having a "hideous hermaphroditical character, which has neither the force and firmness of a man, nor the gentleness and sensibility of a woman."

In return, Adams' men called Vice President Jefferson "a mean-spirited, low-lived fellow, the son of a half-breed Indian squaw, sired by a Virginia mulatto father."

As the slurs piled on, Adams was labeled a fool, a hypocrite, a criminal, and a tyrant, while Jefferson was branded a weakling, an atheist, a libertine, and a coward.

 

source

 

 

The colonies didn't win it all on their own. Without France's help they might have lost.



American Independence day  ?

I've learned something new.



I'm from the US and it's a big deal here.



jason1637 said:
I'm from the US and it's a big deal here.

But is it a bigger deal than the Super Bowl?