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‘Gaming disorder’ to be an official mental health condition

 

THE potential risks that come with obsessively playing video games have been coming to light in recent years, but for the first time gaming may soon be classified as an actual mental health condition. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has listed ‘gaming disorder’ in their recent draft of the 2018 International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), which was last updated 27 years ago in 1990. While the final version of the diagnostic manual won’t be published until next year, it currently states that gaming disorder is “characterised by a pattern of persistent or recurrent gaming behaviour (‘digital gaming’ or ‘video-gaming’), which may be online (ie. over the internet) or offline”. Being added into the ICD-11 will mean that gaming disorder will become an official health diagnosis that can be used by doctors, other health care workers, and insurance companies.But this does not mean that anyone who enjoys playing video games has a mental disorder, with the draft including a series of criteria to help identify when someone is suffering from gaming disorder, these include:    Impaired control over gaming, for example onset, frequency, intensity, duration, termination. 


Increasing priority given to gaming, to the extent that gaming takes priority over other interests and daily activities.    Continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences.It also states that the obsession with playing video games would be severe enough to have significant negative effects on “personal, family, social, educational, occupational” relationships or other key areas of a person’s life.

 

 

This pattern of gaming does not have to be continuous to be defined as gaming disorder, it may also present itself in reoccurring episodes but will usually have to be evident over a 12 month period in order to be accurately diagnosed.Vladimir Poznyak, a member of the WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, told the New Scientist about the importance of officially recognising gaming disorder as a mental health risk. “Health professionals need to recognise that gaming disorder may have serious health consequences,” Mr Poznyak said. “Most people who play video games don’t have a disorder, just like most people who drink alcohol don’t have a disorder either. However, in certain circumstances overuse can lead to adverse effects. ”The idea that video games can have impairments on other significant parts of a person’s life, such as work, was explored earlier this year when an American Time Use Survey linked working less hours to video games.Between 2004 and 2007, men between 21 and 30 years old played two hours of video games per week, but that has now risen to 3.4 hours per week according to the report.Men aged between 21 and 30 years old saw their working hours decline by 12 per cent annually from 2000 to 2015, compared with an 8 per cent decline for older men.

 

 

 

A 2016 Digital Australia report found that Australians might be even more addicted to gaming than their US counterparts, racking up 11 hours a week on average. A separate report also found that Australians were working between one and two hours less a week than the previous decade there have been numerous cases that have displayed the harmful and even deadly effects that constant gaming can have on a person. In February a father-of-three died during a 24-hour gaming marathon he was live streaming to raise money for the Make A Wish foundation.Around the 22 hour mark, 35-year-old gamer Brian Vigneault failed to return to his webcam after leaving to smoke a cigarette.Moderators and viewers assumed Mr Vigneault had fallen asleep but it was later revealed that he had died, with police unable to reveal the circumstances behind his death.The live stream was automatically switched off, but recovered clips of Vigneault’s alleged last moments have been viewed more than 20,000 times.

http://www.news.com.au/technology/home-entertainment/gaming/gaming-disorder-to-be-an-official-mental-health-condition/news-story/cdfeff5ae01fda47603ae6f22ad152e2



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I saw something about this earlier and I didn't pay it much attention. To be honest, I think it's kind of a joke. Do we need to give each hobby it's own version of a mental disorder for when someone gets a bit too obsessive over their hobby?

Last edited by Aeolus451 - on 31 December 2017

It definitely is a mental condition and it should also be defined as one ...

Gaming is only supposed to be an occasional indulgence so one shouldn't spend their only valuable limited time that they have left on just games most of the time since it's just a waste of life to consume cheap digital content ...



It was a fentanyl overdose.

https://southsidedaily.com/2017/05/15/news-ocme-virginia-beach-man-who-died-during-video-game-marathon-overdosed-on-fentanyl/



Great, just great...another mental illness they will put on my sheet.



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I'm not crazy about the wording of this, as it implies that gaming itself is some sort of illness. 'Gaming addiction' was just fine to me. Still, I'm sure the worst of the game demonizing days are behind us with how mainstream and entrenched it is today. Perhaps this will amount to little, or perhaps a proper medical classification could make the effects of predatory practices more tangible and help combat them. Guess we'll see.



fatslob-:O said:
It definitely is a mental condition and it should also be defined as one ...

Gaming is only supposed to be an occasional indulgence so one shouldn't spend their only valuable limited time that they have left on just games most of the time since it's just a waste of life to consume cheap digital content ...

You've spent years discussing it. 10k posts in only a few years. What's the difference?



Gaming addiction, cell phone addiction, online addiction, the list goes on forever. Watch/read all the msm you want though, that's not just ok, it's actually good for you. lol.



ironmanDX said:

You've spent years discussing it. 10k posts in only a few years. What's the difference?

Are you really going to argue 6 that posts per day is the equivalent of a habitual excessive gaming addiction ? My time spent on this forum probably amounts to no more than 30 minutes daily since I've started and not all of them are related to gaming either ... 

There's no excuse to be spending more than 15 hours a week on gaming, that's just straight up a mental condition that some people are not willing to admit ... 



avg 3.4 hours a week? That's a slow day for me, do I need to worry. I did 27 GT Sport races today, one starts every 20 minutes, hmm that's 9 hours. It's a holiday and it's minus 20 outside!

I don't have a gaming disorder, I have a sleeping disorder. Gaming just fills the void :)


It does exist though. A friend of a friend got so addicted to Everquest that he stopped going to work and didn't interact with friends and family anymore. Eventually his family had to intervene and take the pc away. A shame since he gave nice items away in game. /jk Everquest widows is a real thing. At least you can't kill anyone with your car while playing Evequest, well, not yet.