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Do you care about side quests in RPGs

Yes 7 77.78%
 
No 0 0.00%
 
See results 2 22.22%
 
Total:9

So normally I wouldn't do a thread for something this meaningless.
Normally I would just make a wall post, and let ten or so people pass over it; but I am in the mood for a dumb thread, so here I am.

When playing through a game that contains side quests: it is common for a player to accept and ignore the quests that don’t interest the player.
Have you ever wondered what the life of that quest giver is like: constantly waiting for their problems to be solved by someone who doesn't care.

Do you complete all the side quests you accept.
Do you see side quests purely as xp, loot and gold dispensers.
Are there any games that handle ignored side quests in a notable manor.



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I play RPGs partially for their story, and there I want to have the whole picture. For that I want to see all sides and parts of it, and thus do as many sidequests as I can. The XP and Item rewards are a nice bonus, but rarely the reason why I'm doing them



Recently, I've been playing Xenoblade 2, so far the side quests all have a varying degree of importance and have a large librairy of things to do (which wasn't the case XCX), but they still are all important for the developpement of each town, so they never feel a waste of your time.



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A hunt and sidequest in FFXV feels like an adventure.


A sidequest in Ni No Kuni felt like a chore so I skipped most of them at the end.



    

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BasilZero said:
A hunt and sidequest in FFXV feels like an adventure.


A sidequest in Ni No Kuni felt like a chore so I skipped most of them at the end.



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Mar1217 said:
BasilZero said:
A hunt and sidequest in FFXV feels like an adventure.


A sidequest in Ni No Kuni felt like a chore so I skipped most of them at the end.

 

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I typically do every sidequest I find and complete it. I may not try to 100% every game, but I do make it a point to finish every side quest that do not include collecting hundreds of a certain item.



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Due to my backlog, I usually just want to finish a game as quickly as I can.



caffeinade said:

So normally I wouldn't do a thread for something this meaningless.
Normally I would just make a wall post, and let ten or so people pass over it; but I am in the mood for a dumb thread, so here I am.

When playing through a game that contains side quests: it is common for a player to accept and ignore the quests that don’t interest the player.
Have you ever wondered what the life of that quest giver is like: constantly waiting for their problems to be solved by someone who doesn't care.

Do you complete all the side quests you accept.
Do you see side quests purely as xp, loot and gold dispensers.
Are there any games that handle ignored side quests in a notable manor.

I've never had that specific thought, but I wanted to rent a room in the settlement in Borderlands 2. I even had one picked out. That was before grew to hate the game mind you.

To answer your other questions. I usually complete all of the side quests in any game that has them. And sure, more XP and loot is part of the reason. Don't know of any games off hand that dealt with missed quests in any special way.



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caffeinade said:

Are there any games that handle ignored side quests in a notable manor.

Zelda: Majora's Mask and Final Fantasy XIII: Lightning Returns do.
Both games have a real-time progression system that has NPC quest givers move around in the city or world depending on what time of day it is. Certain doors are opened/locked at certain times of day, etc.
They've also given these quests and characters more fleshed out stories than usual, in particular in Lightning Returns, so that you'll actually care about the world you're trying to save. Many of the NPC's have multiple questlines.

The Yakuza series handles side quests really well also. It doesn't use a real time system like the games above, but the Yakuza writers make these sub stories even more fleshed out and interesting than in the two games I mentioned above.