Forums - Gaming Discussion - Uncharted Bundle PS4: $284.99 / (un)official tax discussion thread

kitler53 said:
theprof00 said:
literally murdering sales at this point :D


not really.  this is literally murder:

 


Umm, please remove that. It's really graphic. Like seriously, my little brother @7 years old walked by here and wanted to know what I was looking at, and I just barely managed to ctrl+w before he saw anything. Not that it's only disturbing for 7 years old, I found it rather disturbing myself.



Around the Network

Lol @thePeople discussing tax so seriously in this thread.
That deal is one good find.



NightDragon83 said:

Because sales taxes vary from state to state, and also from city to city in some cases.  For example in New Jersey it's roughly 7% total state sales tax added on to retail price, but let's say you're shopping in New York City, then it's roughly 8.875% combined state & city sales tax added on to retail price.

And the sales tax doesn't apply (in most cases) to fruits & veggies, non-prepared foods (i.e. not at restaurants), and most clothing items.

If it differs from state to state, I can see why they'd show the price without the tax on a website that applies nationwide, like Amazon, etc.
But I don't understand why they wouldn't show the price including the tax in the actual physical store. Because you have price variations between stores as well all the time. And they of course then display different price tags. So why not include the tax in the pricetag in the store?

And yeah, saw someone mention that it doesn't apply to non-prepared food. That makes it less confusing when grocery shopping. But I still don't see why they don't include the tax price on the price tag label.
If you're in a Wallmart in Arizona and a pre-made sandwich costs $3.56 including tax, what does it matter if the same sandwich in a Wallmart in California costs $3.48 including tax? Why would that prevent them from displaying the full price on the sandwich? It's not like I'm gonna want to fly out to Cali to save 8 cents. There are even price differences for the same product within the same state anyway, from store to store.



Teeqoz said:
kitler53 said:


not really.  this is literally murder:

 


Umm, please remove that. It's really graphic. Like seriously, my little brother @7 years old walked by here and wanted to know what I was looking at, and I just barely managed to ctrl+w before he saw anything. Not that it's only disturbing for 7 years old, I found it rather disturbing myself.


Indeed, it's quite brutal.
There was no need for something like that to be posted.



Can i use this deal with best buy since they have the price match?



Around the Network
kitler53 said:
walsufnir said:
"Literally giving it away at this point" ;)

Congratulations, have a lot of fun!



Ha ha ha! That's a nice one! xD




Hiku said:
 

If it differs from state to state, I can see why they'd show the price without the tax on a website that applies nationwide, like Amazon, etc.
But I don't understand why they wouldn't show the price including the tax in the actual physical store. Because you have prices variations between stores as well all the time. And they of course then display different price tags. So why not include the tax in the pricetag in the store?

And yeah, saw someone mention that it doesn't apply to non-prepared food. That makes it less confusing when grocery shopping. But I still don't see why they don't include the tax price on the price tag label.
If you're in a Wallmart in Arizona and a pre-made sandwich costs $3.56 including tax, what does it matter if the same sandwich in a Wallmart in California costs $3.48 including tax? Why would that prevent them from displaying the full price on the sandwich? It's not like I'm gonna want to fly out to Cali to save 8 cents. There are even price differences for the same product within the same state anyway, from store to store.

My theory is it's part blame shifting. It's not us (the store) that makes the price high, it's the government!
At gas stations they do advertise the price including tax, yet there's a big sticker on every pump explaining they (the gas station) are only responsible for part of the price with a nice pie chart of all the taxes added on top.
Anyway it's always best to advertise with the lowest price, hence also Only $349* *After $50 mail in rebate. Screw that. (Does a mail in rebate refund you the taxes as well btw?)

It sucks anyway. I had enough points on my credit card to get a nice new laptop, high-five it's 'free'. Get to checkout, that will be the rest of the points plus another $72 to pay for the rest of the tax.



SvennoJ said:

My theory is it's part blame shifting. It's not us (the store) that makes the price high, it's the government!
At gas stations they do advertise the price including tax, yet there's a big sticker on every pump explaining they (the gas station) are only responsible for part of the price with a nice pie chart of all the taxes added on top.
Anyway it's always best to advertise with the lowest price, hence also Only $349* *After $50 mail in rebate. Screw that. (Does a mail in rebate refund you the taxes as well btw?)

It sucks anyway. I had enough points on my credit card to get a nice new laptop, high-five it's 'free'. Get to checkout, that will be the rest of the points plus another $72 to pay for the rest of the tax.

It does seem like that is the case. But I'm surprised that this kind of confusing thing is accepted in the US, and pretty much no where else in the world that I know of, except Canada.
When I go shopping, I'd like to know exactly how much I have to pay. If I'm strapped for cash and only have $5 and want to eat, I have to count on a buffer of at least 10% in the US, depending on where you are.

I looked into this further on Google, and it seems like what you mentioned is the primarily mentioned reason. But there also seem to be some sort of concerns about implementing VAT, but I'm seeing many more counter arguments to that.
And I read this on Wiki:

"Another avenue of criticism of implementing a VAT is that the increased tax passed to the consumer will increase the ultimate price paid by the consumer. However, a study in Canada reveals that in fact when replacing a traditional sales tax with a VAT consumer prices actually fell."

Anyway, I thought perhaps there was a quick and logical answer to this. That's why I asked.
But it seems the answer is not particularly clear, so maybe I'll make a separate topic about this issue later instead.



Hiku said:

It does seem like that is the case. But I'm surprised that this kind of confusing thing is accepted in the US, and pretty much no where else in the world that I know of, except Canada.
When I go shopping, I'd like to know exactly how much I have to pay. If I'm strapped for cash and only have $5 and want to eat, I have to count on a buffer of at least 10% in the US, depending on where you are.

I looked into this further on Google, and it seems like what you mentioned is the primarily mentioned reason. But there also seem to be some sort of concerns about implementing VAT, but I'm seeing many more counter arguments to that.
And I read this on Wiki:

"Another avenue of criticism of implementing a VAT is that the increased tax passed to the consumer will increase the ultimate price paid by the consumer. However, a study in Canada reveals that in fact when replacing a traditional sales tax with a VAT consumer prices actually fell."

Anyway, I thought perhaps there was a quick and logical answer to this. That's why I asked.
But it seems the answer is not particularly clear, so maybe I'll make a separate topic about this issue later instead.

It makes sense the prices go down cause of the psychological factor in pricing. $9.99 is $11.29 here after tax. Chances are it would be priced $10.99 instead.
$1 drink promotions would not become $1.05 promotions.
So it really is beneficial to stores to advertise without tax (and environmental fees and other stuff that comes on top)

I  moved from the Netherlands to Canada and got used to it. It was a bonus to go down from 19.5% VAT to 13% HST as well.
And there are a bunch of exceptions to wave the 8% provincial portion http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/tax/hst/#pos
At least they don't mind you paying with a credit card here for everything, even if it's just a couple dollars. In Holland stores charged extra for using a debit card under a certain amount. (The bank charges you extra here for using a debit card... always use a credit card)