Forums - Nintendo Discussion - Was going after the casual crowd a bad strategy for Nintendo last gen?

No, abandoning them was.



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In the short term, it was a phenomenal strategy.

In the long term ... it's not helping them. They can't compete with Apple/Google for casuals anymore than they can compete head on with Sony/MS for "hardcore" players. Probably less actually.

A "hardcore" player would probably give the Wii U a look at the right price/games and some good marketing, casuals today are so far gone that they won't touch Nintendo's $40/$60 per game model. Mario is nice, but next to free/$1 casual play games and much "cooler" fashion centric smartphone devices ... Nintendo can't compete with what the casual player expects today.

I don't think there's much Nintendo could've done with the Wii U/3DS to attract large legions of casuals this generation out unless they were willing to make smartphones basically and charge $1/game. There's just no reasoning with this audience any more, they got a taste of that and now won't accept anything different and the whole appeal of smart devices is that they replace the need for multiple old devices, which means tough sh*t for all console makers wanting casuals (Kinect in XBox One was a liability as a result too) and handhelds are in huge trouble. 

Whereas on the flip side, if they Nintendo taken advantage of their year headstart and made a decently powerful next-gen console with some good games, they honestly could be sitting fairly well off right now. They wouldn't beat Sony's PS4, probably not in the long term, but they likely could've beat the XBox One in this situation and finished with a decent no.2 standing this gen if they had executed properly. 

Instead they compromised and made a "sort of" casual machine with the Wii U -- underpowered, gimmicky, lots of mini-games and casual Mario fare early on.



jonathanalis said:
they got billions of money.
So now they can lost money every year for 20 years that they will be still good.

So they have 20 years to construct a image again.

So, good idea.

Keep in mind that Nintendo had billions in the "bank" right before the Wii was released.



Pavolink said:
No, abandoning them was.

The casuals abandoned them first. Nintendo was still trying to appeal to them until some point last year.



fatslob-:O said:
No! What's a bad strategy is Nintendo NOT expanding the gaming audience like they are now ...


This a million times over



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mZuzek said:
Pavolink said:
No, abandoning them was.

The casuals abandoned them first. Nintendo was still trying to appeal to them until some point last year.


Not really, they tossed out some vague rhetoric, but it was obvious from their actions they had moved beyond the expanded audience.

First clue was the system itself, especially the gamepad, its big clunky and uneccesary.

Second is the library especially the rehash NSMB Wii U and the shallow Nintendoland, which showed Nintendo was not interested in really reaching out to an expanded audience like they did with the Wii



Nope. I got more good Nintendo games on Wii than I got for Gamecube. Just because Nintendo added a ton of casual stuff to the hardcore stuff does not make it bad at all.

People might say "but Nintendo could have focused on hardcore games instead of Wii sports resort" etc etc but in what Universe does e.g.a Wii Sports game have the same development time or need the same amount of money to produce as one of Nintendo's top IPs?

I got 2 Mario games compared to GCs 1. I also got a Sin and Punishment (which basically is StarFox wihtout ArWings) I got a Metroid Prime game. I also got a Paper Mario game (even tho that was was meh). I also got Fire Emblem and Battalion Wars, Smash and Mario Kart. I got 2 Zelda games (1 was a port tho). There is Xenoblade, The Last Story and Pandoras Tower etc etc.

I see all the Wii "insert word" games as an addition to all the typical Nintendo games. I would also have loved to get more god-tier games with exploration and story etc instead of "prototypes" or "minigame collections" but I cannot complain when I compare Wii to Gamecube.

Nintendo's mistake was not to go for the casuals it was for not knowing what to do with them once they got them to buy a Wii.

Another mistake was letting third party force them to make the "seal of quality" useless.   If the seal would still be in use (the original use) then we would not have gotten all the 20mb flash game crap software  burned on disks and then sold at retail.



Honestly, no.

 

I don't think that going after the casual market is a bad thing inherently. So long as you have the excitement or power to back that up. Nintendo could easily grab the casual market because it was a local multiplayer family friendly console already. It was merely playing to its strengths, and got a wider audience for more and more consumers.

I'd say that Nintendo's problems lie in expecting that to happen again with the Wii U.

If the Wii taught us anything, it's that people get bored of innovations quickly and want to go to a state of efficiency. Late games showed the lack of interest in waggling the remote and focused more on just pressing the buttons (like NSMB, for example or how many people play Smash Brawl with GameCube controllers).

With people already bored of moving their stick backwards and forwards and ready to move on, the best decision would've been to move on with them. Instead, Nintendo kept pushing the Wii schtick along and the people who already weren't interested simply went on to other things like smartphone apps and tablets.

I think Nintendo's going to either need to innovate the shit out of their next console or get a hard-hitting line-up of new and exciting games rather than pushing out games we've been playing since the 90s.

 



mZuzek said:
Pavolink said:
No, abandoning them was.

The casuals abandoned them first. Nintendo was still trying to appeal to them until some point last year.

He is right. Nintendo stopped supporting the Wii a long time ago, and even during its peak quality software releases were few and far between. That is the reason why the casuals moved on to either smartphone games, no games or other console games.



axt113 said:

Not really, they tossed out some vague rhetoric, but it was obvious from their actions they had moved beyond the expanded audience.

First clue was the system itself, especially the gamepad, its big clunky and uneccesary.

Second is the library especially the rehash NSMB Wii U and the shallow Nintendoland, which showed Nintendo was not interested in really reaching out to an expanded audience like they did with the Wii

Just because they did it wrong doesn't mean they weren't trying to.

They knew the casuals had moved to tablets, so the gamepad was an obvious attempt at getting their attention back by having a similar device. Nintendo Land was an attempt at recreating the Wii Sports effect, while NSMBU was only the newest in a franchise that has always sold countless millions to casuals. They were 100% committed to bringing back the casuals for the Wii U, but they failed because the casuals were obviously not willing to pay $300 to play $60 games when they already have a tablet filled with free to play stuff.