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Guessed by uran10

"I'm going to ask you a favor, sleepyhead.
Ever since we were kids, I'd always be the one to wake you up when you slept in.
But this time, when all of this is over, will you come to wake me up?"

Skyward Sword is a flawed game. It has a poor, empty overworld in the sky, is maybe a bit too linear for a Zelda game, has tedious filler here and there, some underwhelming bosses, and worst of all, constantly bothers you with 10 seconds of unskippable text every time you get some treasure or catch some bugs.

However, I'm always one to try and enjoy a game for what it is, instead of having expectations of how it should be. I played Skyward Sword enjoying it for all the things that made it good, while not being too annoyed by its flaws, since all of them were minor enough I could just put aside - and once you do that, you're in for an unforgettable experience.

The game hooked me like no other game ever did. Through its amazing story, immersive controls and soundtrack, and gorgeous visuals, I felt completely engaged in its world and disconnected from real life whenever I was playing it. Whenever I wasn't playing it (that is, during my first playthrough) I would always think about it and want to get back to playing it as soon as possible.

The story was perfect. After a lovely introduction, shit got real as always and you had to go out to save Zelda, a character who you actually do care about this time - but after a long time looking for her, you start to realize there's much more going on and so much more at stake than just your girlfriend's life. This transition was handled perfectly and came to an unbelievable, emotional climax after the sixth dungeon. And the thing is, it wasn't just Zelda you cared about: every single character in this game was memorable. Ghirahim was a villain you truly hated and wanted to kill at any opportunity; Groose was a total douche whose problems were understandable and came around in a great way; Impa was mysterious and burns you in just the right amount to keep you going; the final boss (no, I'm not using names) was a great villain that actually played a good role in the story despite being similar to Ganondorf's tacked in role in TP; and Fi, as annoying as she was, was actually a companion that you cared about and helped you just enough without being too dickish (Navi) or OP (Midna).

The soundtrack, graphics and controls made for an immersive experience unlike any other. They all maybe take some time to get used to and start to really appreciate, but once that happens it's pretty clear how amazing they are. It was impossible to play this game on a big screen and not feel like you were right there swinging that sword yourself. Oh and shooting arrows too, because shooting arrows was awesome.

In terms of level design, the game was almost flawless. The only big issue here is the Sky, but ignoring that it really is perfection: Skyloft is a beautiful place that feels good to traverse while still making sense as a little town, and is filled with sidequests and collectibles everywhere; the 3 land regions are masterfully designed in a way that forces you to travel through them in a linear set of challenges the first time, but later allow you to explore with a lot of freedom; and the dungeons are hands down by far the best dungeons we've ever seen in Zelda, without being too big like the ones from MM, WW and TP, while still taking a while to finish because of the sheer amount of stuff you have to do in each room - they truly feel like compact little packages filled with greatness.

But I think I've said enough. I love Skyward Sword because I can overlook its flaws and appreciate it for what it is truly great at. It's one of the most flawed Zelda games, but it's in its strengths and flaws that it becomes such a memorable, unique experience, whereas other, more flawless games, just feel generic in comparison. And when looking at this game based on was it's really good at, it easily stands out as a very, very special experience.