Quantcast
When do you think that HD will become a standard? P.S. What is " true HD" ?

Forums - General Discussion - When do you think that HD will become a standard? P.S. What is " true HD" ?

nephel said:
ookaze said:

- probably believe the THX sound they have at home is the same norm that the THX in theaters


Not to derail onto an audio tangent, but people generally don't have THX sound at home. They have THX certified equipment. However, to have an actual THX sound system, it has to be configured along specific guidelines and tested for audio quality across the room being wired. Theatres do this to get THX certification on specific theatres for the marketing value (and maybe to entice audiophiles in some locations).

I doubt many home theatres have been configured properly or tested for certification.

THX is a certification for specific configurations of the environment and thresholds of performance of audio equipment. (sort of like the government security certifications for operating systems. They dont certify the os, they certify the os running on a specific configuration of hardware.)

All that being said, i've heard they are getting to the point where they'll slap the THX logo on just about anything for enough money, so even THX certified sound setups might not be configured properly anymore.


Having THX sound and having THX certified equipment means exactly the same thing, as THX is just a certification, like you said. 

So yeah you're right, you just didn't abuse the language like I (and everyone else) did. Like I said, the certification at home and in theaters are not the same too. The certification for home doesn't take into account the speakers, the wires and the position of speakers.

So of course, if you're only used to the THX for theaters (the original one), you can only be disgusted by the THX (and its numerous light versions) for home. Just remember that it's not the same thing, even if the logo is the same, then it's fine.
 Home and theaters have different requirements, and that applies in audio as well as in video.



Around the Network

As I can tell for germany: Most regions here switched from analog to digital tv-broadcast (DVB-T) recently. People had to buy a new TV-tuner for this. They will not understand, why they have to buy new equipment again. Additionally, tv-broadcast with HD is nearly nonexisting. I know about AnixeHD (A sattelite broadcast I believe) but most normal satellite, radio-wave and cable broadcast delivers no HD. Even if you get HD-signals, nearly no content is in HD, thats only some shows like Desperate Housewives and Greys anatomy or some documentation, that re in HD. So I think, here in germany it will need some more years, before HD-adoption becomes relevant. My guess is: not before 2010.



3DS-FC: 4511-1768-7903 (Mii-Name: Mnementh), Nintendo-Network-ID: Mnementh, Switch: SW-7706-3819-9381 (Mnementh)

my greatest games: 2017, 2018

Predictions: Switch / Switch vs. XB1 in the US / Three Houses first quarter

Non Sequor said:
HD-DVD and Bluray aren't going to see the sort of adoption that DVD had. DVD offered a lot of features that VHS didn't have (menus, commentary, scene selection, bonuses) and there was also a flood of content released on it (rereleases of old movies and boxed sets of TV shows).

HD-DVD has no substantial new features aside from higher resolution and there is no back library of HD content. A lot of people aren't going to be upgrading their TV and DVD player just so they can watch 300 with a sharper picture.

I'm pretty sure that isn't true, as I think that many films have been recorded in HD for a long time. heck, there was even an HD version of betamax tapes! Reason for this being, is that the film industry knew that HD would come eventually, and I think that most cinemas have been displaying in HD for a considerable time.

So there is plenty of HD content available, just hasn't been used in the home yet, so you'd probably be able to expect many films from the past 5/10 years or so, to be available in HD, within due course.



One person's experience or opinion never shows the general consensus

PSN ID: Tispower

MSN: tispower1@hotmail.co.uk

Tispower said:
Non Sequor said:
HD-DVD and Bluray aren't going to see the sort of adoption that DVD had. DVD offered a lot of features that VHS didn't have (menus, commentary, scene selection, bonuses) and there was also a flood of content released on it (rereleases of old movies and boxed sets of TV shows).

HD-DVD has no substantial new features aside from higher resolution and there is no back library of HD content. A lot of people aren't going to be upgrading their TV and DVD player just so they can watch 300 with a sharper picture.

I'm pretty sure that isn't true, as I think that many films have been recorded in HD for a long time. heck, there was even an HD version of betamax tapes! Reason for this being, is that the film industry knew that HD would come eventually, and I think that most cinemas have been displaying in HD for a considerable time.

So there is plenty of HD content available, just hasn't been used in the home yet, so you'd probably be able to expect many films from the past 5/10 years or so, to be available in HD, within due course.


Hello Movies dont have to be recorded in HD for you to have HD content. 35mm is the standard for almost one century now and is good enough to be transfered in digital 1080p. So the back library is there, it is most of the movies ever made. The lowest resolution for movies projection is generally about 2K, 2048x1080 and it will be soon 4k, 4096x2160. Cinema is in HD for a long long time already. Bye.



Zones : I still don't understand all the love for Blizzard, what was the last game they developed worth playing?
mrpapaye said:
Tispower said:
Non Sequor said:
HD-DVD and Bluray aren't going to see the sort of adoption that DVD had. DVD offered a lot of features that VHS didn't have (menus, commentary, scene selection, bonuses) and there was also a flood of content released on it (rereleases of old movies and boxed sets of TV shows).

HD-DVD has no substantial new features aside from higher resolution and there is no back library of HD content. A lot of people aren't going to be upgrading their TV and DVD player just so they can watch 300 with a sharper picture.

I'm pretty sure that isn't true, as I think that many films have been recorded in HD for a long time. heck, there was even an HD version of betamax tapes! Reason for this being, is that the film industry knew that HD would come eventually, and I think that most cinemas have been displaying in HD for a considerable time.

So there is plenty of HD content available, just hasn't been used in the home yet, so you'd probably be able to expect many films from the past 5/10 years or so, to be available in HD, within due course.


Hello Movies dont have to be recorded in HD for you to have HD content. 35mm is the standard for almost one century now and is good enough to be transfered in digital 1080p. So the back library is there, it is most of the movies ever made. The lowest resolution for movies projection is generally about 2K, 2048x1080 and it will be soon 4k, 4096x2160. Cinema is in HD for a long long time already. Bye.


Ok, you're probably correct lol. I knew that cinema had been HD for a long time, didn't realise it had been that long! :)



One person's experience or opinion never shows the general consensus

PSN ID: Tispower

MSN: tispower1@hotmail.co.uk

Around the Network

i thought films recorded with analogue cameras could be upscaled as big as you want, like with film photography... if you take a photo with a digital camera it is made of pixels and can only be enlarged as far as the resolution lets it, with a film camera you can enlarge it as much as you want depending only on the limits of your printing medium [or the cleanlyness of the camera lens]

i assumed old film reels would work the same way, as long as the original is still fine you could scale it to 1080 easily.



TWRoO said:
i thought films recorded with analogue cameras could be upscaled as big as you want, like with film photography... if you take a photo with a digital camera it is made of pixels and can only be enlarged as far as the resolution lets it, with a film camera you can enlarge it as much as you want depending only on the limits of your printing medium [or the cleanlyness of the camera lens]

i assumed old film reels would work the same way, as long as the original is still fine you could scale it to 1080 easily.

 Yea, I think it is, but don't forget, eventually if you keep on zooming into a film, it will eventually get blurry, because the light didn't affect the film fast enough, or there wasn't enough focus, and as film tech has been improving, it means that you'd be able to get higher resolution from a newer film, shot with newer equipment, presumably lol



One person's experience or opinion never shows the general consensus

PSN ID: Tispower

MSN: tispower1@hotmail.co.uk

i also think both hd dvd and blu ray will be replaced by a video download service in the future much like ipods replaced cds and tapes.



if you take a moment and look out your windows, you'll see true HD.
1080p TV are still too expensive to be mainstream. Christmas '08 is probably when it becomes more affordable.



Full HD = 1080p

Sure, displays have already surpassed that and will continue to do so, but standard HD, and thus "Full HD", is 1080p. That's why HD movies are encoded in 1080p, and it should be the norm for quite a few years.

I think HDTVs will have at least 50% market share in the US by 2009, thus making them "the norm". We're already surpassing the 30% mark and HD adoption rates continue to grow by leaps and bounds. Not to mention analog signals will be completely gone by 2009, as mandated by law (not that that will have much overall effect). The fact that most retail stores are full of HDTVs, with maybe 4-5 models of SDTVs at most, is also helping HD become the standard as well.

In Europe, HD won't become mainstream for at least 4-5 years. HDTVs are pretty rare in stores over there from what I hear, and that isn't likely to change soon. It's almost as if retailers are cramming HD down our throats here in the US, not that I'm complaining. :P