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Darashiva said:
No guesses for these two yet, so here's an additional hint for both:
#22
-"The End of World" is literally a massive wall that divides an entire continent
-A JRPG originally released on the Sega Saturn, a few years later on the PlayStation, and just earlier this year the HD remaster came out on PC and Switch.

Grandia



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Sorry, I'm late.

#26 - Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back (PS1): I never had a Playstation, so I used to play the Crash Bandicoot trilogy at my friend's house, when I was a kid. Crash 2 is a fantastic upgrade over the first game, with better graphics, gameplay, and a incredible soundtrack. And I still play it today.



#27 - Freedom Planet - Wii U/NS

Sonic meets good game design meets Treasure Inc.

I fell in love quite easily with this game, it reminds me of the crazy and bizarre worlds and action of titles like Mischief Makers or Sin & Punishment, with somewhat out there stories but that is still very endearing.

The gameplay is excellent too, it draws quite heavily out of Sonic the Hedgehog in terms of the main gimmick being speed, but it bring QoL improvements that makes FP a lot better, most enemies can't hurt you unless they directly attack you, so running into them because your character is naturally fast gives you just enough time to get out of their way or start an attack, instead of unfairly punishing you for not knowing the level layout and enemy placement, general control and flow of the characters is fluid, camera stays put no matter what, among other small touches that make the game very pleasant, while still remaining a fair challenge.

The bosses are one of the major highlights too, again reminding me a lot of my favorite Treasure games, they are a visual and gameplay treat.



Let's have a champion time!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUG_NS0xqSY

#26 - Super Mario World - SNES/GBA

I don't know if I can say much else about this game that hasn't already been said over the years.

Is a gud game.



Let's have a champion time!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUG_NS0xqSY

Jpcc86 said:
Darashiva said:
No guesses for these two yet, so here's an additional hint for both:
#22
-"The End of World" is literally a massive wall that divides an entire continent
-A JRPG originally released on the Sega Saturn, a few years later on the PlayStation, and just earlier this year the HD remaster came out on PC and Switch.

Grandia

Correct.



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#38 The Last of Us

The Last of Us starts off with a story so tragic and gripping, that it's hard to believe it's really happening to Joel. I still remember watching youtube videos of complete non-gamers playing this game's first hour and just being taken away by how emotionally powerful it is. After this personal tragedy hits Joel we are fast forwarded 20 years. The whole world has been ruined by a zombie apocalypse that happened at the start of the game. Joel is then sent on a mission that forces him to spend all of this time with Ellie, a person that reminds him of his loss all those years ago. Joel and Ellie have to travel to another part of the country together, while trying to avoid bandits, zombies, and other pitfalls. These two characters go through hell together, eventually becoming very close. Towards the end of the game Joel is forced to choose between saving his friend or helping the world at large. 

The gameplay is excellent building on the Uncharted series' gameplay significantly. I always feel like Naughty Dog is asking "why can't you do this, or this" in their games, and then changing them so you can. Yes, you can climb things in TLoU, yes you can punch enemies knocking them out, yes you can use stealth in a shooter style game, yes you can scavenge metal and build things. Hopefully one day video games will be so advanced that we will be able to do in game, whatever we would be able to do in real life with our own bodies. Games like TLoU, BotW, and Uncharted 2 have always brought us a little closer to that dream. For that, and for the gripping, fantastic story TLoU makes the list. 

#37 God of War

Open world games are often quite empty. They contain as much content as any other game, but that content is either spaced farther apart, or blandly uninspired. God of War on the other hand is almost as densely packed with things to do and discoveries as a Metroidvania game. And when you're not making discoveries you're fighting enemies in an excellently revamped combat system, or being told the most interesting stories via banter from the game's three amigos. The decision to add the Frost Axe as Kratos' main weapon instead of the Blades of Chaos was a huge improvement. I always felt that combos from the Blades of Chaos were too easy to pull off due to the reach that they had. The Axe on the other hand is more of a close up weapon. Eventually you do get to use the Blades in this game, but they've been tweaked from older GoW games to be not as OP as they used to be. The equipment system in GoW is just as complex as any RPG like Mass Effect 2. This allows each player to build Kratos the way they want him to fight. Most of the boss fights were fairly easy, but the Valkyries were just genius. They were designed as post-game challenge bosses and it shows. Each Valkyrie has a unique set of moves, and is challenging as hell. But the final Valkyrie has all of the moves of all the previous Valkyries you've fought. So you're fighting this final boss that has this massive plethora of moves. She has to be the most complicated boss I've ever fought in any videogame ever. 



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The sentence above is true. 

Guessed by @Mnementh

Easily one of the most beautiful games I've played. When this game released, I didn't know much about it beyond it being an indie metroidvania (barely any of those), and I remember how I first took interest in it - I was watching the 2015 Game Awards, and somewhere in the middle of that borefest, there were like 2 seconds of Ori gameplay featured in the "best art direction" category. From that moment, I was sold. Those 2 seconds looked so pretty I just had to check it out, and the game itself is far from a disappointment... however, it suffers from one issue that's always the downfall of any good metroidvania.

Ori and the Blind Forest is the kind of game that blasts out all its guns immediately, and from then on it gets progressively worse. At no point does this game get boring, mind you, but it does have a problem of not knowing how to keep the gameplay interesting in the late game, with most of the later items and power-ups feeling like unnecessary upgrades to abilities you already have, or being artificial keys to artificial locks - and beyond that, each new power-up you get takes up a different spot on the controller that feels so arbitrarily mapped, at the end of the game you're having a hard time knowing what each button does. The game's definitive edition only amplifies this issue, sadly - otherwise, the extra content would've been greatly appreciated.

However, what's good about it can't be praised highly enough. The prologue is unbelievably moving, the first few areas are a joy to explore (especially with that music), and the first dungeon is absolutely bonkers. The bash ability is one of the most creative gameplay mechanics I've seen in a game of its kind, and it's always a joy to use - if only there were more interesting power-ups like it. All in all, this game is quite amazing, but after 3 playthroughs, I've little reason to go back to it - however, with the sequel now firmly in the horizon, I'm quite excited for what's coming.



Guessed by no one.

The "let's take this game, make it a bit prettier and fill it up with a lot of new content" kind of sequel. Splatoon 2 changes very little from its predecessor, and it uses that pre-established formula and engine perfectly to create a new experience that's far more complete and fun than what came before. Other than the new stuff, though, this game's merits are very much the same - the memories I've created playing online multiplayer, a fun final boss (well, in the DLC at least), and just generally a lot of fun. Because, yeah, spoilers, Splatoon is fun.

Unfortunately for this fella, I have barely touched other multiplayer games on the Switch since the release of Smash Ultimate. I'm beyond the point of caring about it, but given enough time and effort, I'd be down for a Splatoon 3 that is entirely brand new.



Guessed by @Mnementh

Everyone's favorite and least favorite sailing simulator is here! The Wind Waker is, well, what it is. It's a great Zelda game oozing with charm, wonder, and excitement. It is also a Zelda game with extremely tedious dungeons and annoying bosses, as well as a poorly developed main quest filled with boring "go to random island to get the specific power-up" moments. It's kinda amazing, really, how bad this game gets most of the actual level design stuff, for how fun it actually is to play - that's probably more than anything due to how it was rushed. Maybe those dungeons, and bosses, and annoying fetch quests were all somewhat unfinished, and we do know there were ideas left on the table, but the game had to be put out fast and thus they used whatever time they had to focus on making the base gameplay as fun as possible and getting the artstyle just right. I suppose in the middle of all that, someone forgot to tell the composers to hurry up, because the soundtrack here is phenomenal and is likely the main reason why there's such a strong sense of adventure here.



Hints for my next three.

#25 - I suppose they couldn't have blood in the game, so they just made the villain bleed green goo.
#24 - The first side-scrolling release in this franchise for 13 years, and it's a remake.
#23 - A console game that required extra memory to be played.