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Expectations don't matter

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I used to try keeping my expectations low so as to not be disappointed in stuff (to no avail), but after thinking about it I realized, why bother?  What difference do my expectations make? If a game is good, it's good. If the game is bad, it's still bad even if I expected it to bad. The end product is all that matters. I see this now as another poor defense people commonly use. "The game isn't bad, your expectations were just too high!" I'm curious if anyone disagrees with this line of thinking and why.



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That depends.
If someone does overhype something it can feel a good thing is bad because it was not on par with his expectations.
The end product is what matters indeed, but one can look it in an unfair manner if it was expecting a lot more.



A game that it's good will not have the same impact if you thought it was going to be bad, or excellent. The surprise always influences your opinion.



You know it deserves the GOTY.

Come join The 2018 Obscure Game Monthly Review Thread.

Expectations can be tied to preferences.

One person can expect a fighting game to launch with a certain mode, because they feel it's essential to the game. While another person doesn't think that mode is essential to a fighting game, and has no particular expectations on whether or not that mode will be included.

The first person becomes disappointed in the game because they feel it is missing something essential, while the second person is content with what they got.



Expectations for something such as a sequel for example will inevitably arise, if only because the previous game has primed you for them - and that will ultimately affect your reception of a given game.
Besides that, expectations across a genre are a thing - better games in genre are only better because they have a reference point in another game - to which comparisons will be inevitably made, thus affecting expectations.

The whole system is somewhat, but not entirely, out of our hands, so, a bad game may be received better - and a good one worse.



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Expectations are impossible to ignore, I am reading thinking fast and slow by Daniel Kahneman and it proposes (with stats and scientific experiments to back it up) that your brain has basically two modes: the “fast” mode is biased, oversimplifies things and can easily be influenced by others. The “slow” mode is more unbiased but it uses up a lot of brain power and is prone to handing tasks right back to the fast mode to make life easier.

What is interesting though, is you are speaking about having “too high” expectations. Most of the book’s studies would suggest that if you see amazing reviews everywhere else, you will tend towards rating the product more highly yourself. Perhaps there is something special about how we view entertainment like games or movies in relation to the numbers and kudos we hear from critics or friends. I would argue it may be because we each have a very different list of entertainment experiences to draw from. Zombieland means something different to folks who love horror than people who dislike it; Shrek means something different to someone raised on Disney than someone raised on Ren and Stimpy



BraLoD said:
That depends.
If someone does overhype something it can feel a good thing is bad because it was not on par with his expectations.
The end product is what matters indeed, but one can look it in an unfair manner if it was expecting a lot more.

Good point I have seen people do this. Assuming one bases their opinions on the game itself, then their expectations shouldn't matter.

Darwinianevolution said:
A game that it's good will not have the same impact if you thought it was going to be bad, or excellent. The surprise always influences your opinion.

Wait whut, how can your opinion be influenced by surprise if your opinion is what you're surprised by? xD

Hiku said:

Expectations can be tied to preferences.

One person can expect a fighting game to launch with a certain mode, because they feel it's essential to the game. While another person doesn't think that mode is essential to a fighting game, and has no particular expectations on whether or not that mode will be included.

The first person becomes disappointed in the game because they feel it is missing something essential, while the second person is content with what they got.

I guess they can be but not always. You can prefer one thing and still expect the opposite i.e. I'd prefer good Pokemon games but I only expect more bad ones lulz.

In your example I'd say they don't matter. Even if that first person didn't expect it to be there they still wouldn't be happy it's not there. Like I said, bad thing is bad even if you expect it.



I'm not going to provide an opinion on whether expectations matter, but I for one have a very hard time not feeling disappointed if a new game in an existing and awesome series turns out 'just' good or even worse, mediocre! Some games just have a standard they're expected to meet and if they don't, people are going to be unhappy. Not all games exist on their own, they can also have context (Well, all games have, but some have more than others.)

Other than that, i think there's a fair point here about setting expectations on a suitable level.



I would say that expectations don't turn a bad game on a good game or vice-versa.

But when you don't expect anything of anything them if that don't happen or is bad you don't feel as bad.

Also yes high expectations can lead something that is great in good on your opinion because of your high expectation not being met (like some stuff not being in the game that you expected to have).



duduspace11 "Well, since we are estimating costs, Pokemon Red/Blue did cost Nintendo about $50m to make back in 1996"

http://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/post.php?id=8808363

Mr Puggsly: "Hehe, I said good profit. You said big profit. Frankly, not losing money is what I meant by good. Don't get hung up on semantics"

http://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/post.php?id=9008994

Lonely_Dolphin said:
Hiku said:

Expectations can be tied to preferences.

One person can expect a fighting game to launch with a certain mode, because they feel it's essential to the game. While another person doesn't think that mode is essential to a fighting game, and has no particular expectations on whether or not that mode will be included.

The first person becomes disappointed in the game because they feel it is missing something essential, while the second person is content with what they got.

I guess they can be but not always. You can prefer one thing and still expect the opposite i.e. I'd prefer good Pokemon games but I only expect more bad ones lulz.

In your example I'd say they don't matter. Even if that first person didn't expect it to be there they still wouldn't be happy it's not there. Like I said, bad thing is bad even if you expect it.

Well, that's not really a possibility in the scenario I described, because I'm talking about features they would always expect because they consider them essential.

I would always expect a training mode to be included in a fighting game. But a casual player who just wants to check out the story of Mortal Kombat 11 may not care about that feature, and have no expectations about it.

Last edited by Hiku - on 28 October 2019