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Should Sony release the Playstation 5 before or after Scarlett?

Forums - Gaming Discussion - Should Sony release the Playstation 5 before or after Scarlett?

Sony should release the Playstation 5...

...Before Scarlett 4 11.76%
 
...Along with Scarlett 27 79.41%
 
...After the Scarlett 3 8.82%
 
Total:34

The majority of Switch sales will now be coming from the lite which is a handheld console only. It's basically a 3DS with a couple of shared 3rd party games that PS4/XB1 has/had and now just look worse.
There is no direct competition between with them.



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Every console manufacturer should release their console when they are ready. When are they ready? Well…

1. Have they worked out, what the new generation actually should improve over the current one?

2. Does their current prototype deliver this?

3. Have they worked out a marketing message that explains this improvement?

4. Can they deliver this improvement to a market acceptable pricepoint?

5. Have they ironed out production issues?

6. Are the third-parties on board?

7. Have they dev-kits delivered and more ready?

8. Can they offer a good program for indies to get on board?

9. Have they major games ready for launch?

10. Have they major games in development for the first year?

11. Cover the launch and first year games major distinctive kinds of customers?

If they can deliver this, then they are ready to launch.



3DS-FC: 4511-1768-7903 (Mii-Name: Mnementh), Nintendo-Network-ID: Mnementh, Switch: SW-7706-3819-9381 (Mnementh)

my greatest games: 2017, 2018, 2019

Predictions: Switch / Switch vs. XB1 in the US / Three Houses first quarter

Blood_Tears said:
The majority of Switch sales will now be coming from the lite which is a handheld console only. It's basically a 3DS with a couple of shared 3rd party games that PS4/XB1 has/had and now just look worse.
There is no direct competition between with them.

I don't know about that, maybe in the short term the lite will sell better but I think in the long run the normal model will probably sell better. Japan may be an exception to this.



Barkley said:
pikashoe said:

Well the ps4 had a pretty poor line up and sold really well so Sony could probably release with a few low effort titles and sell really well again.

That's true, but then the XBO didn't have a good launch lineup either. So it depends, if Scarlett has an amazing launch lineup that might be a problem. Halo Infinite is already confirmed, though that is crossgen.

Thats correct. Even the WiiU stumbled out the gate. We cannot expect next gen to repeat the same offenders and yes, Halo Infinite is confirmed to be a launch game for Scarlett so there is 1 killer App already planned.



pikashoe said:
Blood_Tears said:
The majority of Switch sales will now be coming from the lite which is a handheld console only. It's basically a 3DS with a couple of shared 3rd party games that PS4/XB1 has/had and now just look worse.
There is no direct competition between with them.

I don't know about that, maybe in the short term the lite will sell better but I think in the long run the normal model will probably sell better. Japan may be an exception to this.

Yeah, it really depends on what additional models are launched, whether the pricegap remains similair etc. If both systems stayed at $299/$199 respectively and there were no new models I think the Lite would take over 50% of sales from now until the end, too big a price difference. But there's many things that can happen over the next 4-5 years such as the price gap getting smaller or a "Switch XL/Pro" that could easily put the more expensive Switch back as the primary seller. Japan should be a lock-in for Lite dominance though.



Predictions (Made July 2019)

LTD: PS4 - 130m, Switch - 110m, XBO - 52m       2019 : PS4 - 15m, Switch - 18.8m, XBO - 4.8m        2020: Switch - 22m (Peak Year)


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The_Liquid_Laser said:

This narrative is common, but the people who say it really need to do their homework.  The Genesis launched in 1989 and got slaughtered by the NES that year.  It also lost to the NES in 1990.  The Genesis never affected NES sales in the slightest.  But looking at the whole lifetime of the Genesis, it was in very close competition with the SNES.  The Genesis could not affect the NES, because it had too much sales momentum behind it when the Genesis launched.  But when the SNES launched, the Genesis was a cheaper system with a decent library of games already built up.  Lots of people bought the Genesis instead of the SNES for those reasons.  

Genesis hardware was similar to SNES, so developing games for both systems was not a big problem.
When a non-first party game is announced these days, you'll pretty much always see the PS4 logo at the end. But if the Switch logo isn't there, no one is surprised at this point, for Generation 8 games. And the process of making Generation 9 games work on the Switch is not going to get any easier.

A system's main selling point tends to be the games. And on that front, their libraries will surely only get more diverse as PS5 and Scarlett are released.
If you want to play a game like Resident Evil Remake 3, you'll probably need one of those systems.
And if you want games unique to Switch, or to play console level games on the go, you'll need a Switch.



Xxain said:
Chrkeller said:
Doesn't matter. Price and software drives sales.

On top of this, the ball is waaay in SONY's court. They goin in with a much stronger brand and consumer loyalty.

Yes. I will probably take both at the end.



Playing right now : Shadow Of WarDeath Stranding, Gears 5 and Star Wars Jedi Fallen Order.

Can someone fire the person in charge of code names at Microsoft. We had Durango (fucking SUV) last gen now Scarlett. Nintendo with dolphin did a better job and dolphin is a stupid name.



Barkley said:
The_Liquid_Laser said:

Switch and PS5 and Scarlett will all be in direct competition with each other.  

Switch and PS5 are in direct competition.  They are both home console systems.

It doesn't matter that they are both "home console systems" that doesn't mean they are in direct competition. They will appeal to a different potential market because they are very different products with different libraries and experiences.

PlayStation and Xbox offer the same thing, Nintendo offers something different. It doesn't matter how large the install base for Switch is, and it doesn't matter what games the Switch gets.

The market that buys Fifa, CoD, GTA, Assassins Creed, Red Dead Redemption etc will buy them on PlayStation or Xbox. Even if these games were to release on the Switch their sales would be tiny by comparison.

There is a clear demand for western AAA gaming and the experiences that PlayStation/Xbox consoles offer that the Switch can never fulfil, just as there is a clear demand for Nintendo games and the experiences that the Switch offers which PlayStation/Xbox can never fulfil. As neither platform can fulfil the same demands they are not in direct competition.

A person who wants to play CoD but also wants to play Zelda doesn't suddenly lose the desire to play CoD when they buy a Switch, nor do they lose the desire to play Zelda when they purchase a PlayStation/Xbox. Some people desire both, some people only want one, the key is they're different products wanted for different reasons.

"Direct competition is a situation in which two or more businesses offer products or services that are essentially the same;" - PlayStation and Xbox, they offer a very similair experience and both cater to the same market with an emphasis on Western AAA gaming.

"Indirect competition is the conflict between vendors whose products or services are not the same but that could satisfy the same consumer need." - PlayStation/Xbox and Switch. Their products and services are very different but they could satisfy the same consumer need (entertainment/gaming).

This is the type of argument made by someone who thinks gaming started in Generation 6.  2D Mario and 2D Sonic may look different on the surface, but they are actually not that different from each other.  They are both 2D platformers.  A lot of former Mario fans bought a Genesis for Sonic instead.  Both games basically scratch the same itch.

Switch games are not that different from Playstation games.  Are you going to tell me that if a person wants to play Horizon: Zero Dawn then they would never ever consider Breath of the Wild?  The games are pretty similar.  Or perhaps a person likes RPGs?  They might ignore Final Fantasy 16 on the PS5 and instead decide they want to play Pokemon, XC2, Octopath Traveler, and all of the other RPGs on the Switch.  These games are really not that different.  They scratch the same itch.

Given, there are plenty of games on both systems that are pretty different too, but if you go back before Generation 6, it was common to have home consoles with significant differences in their game libraries.  The Genesis had a different feel from both the NES and the SNES, while the latter two feel similar.  A lot of people still left the NES to buy a Genesis next generation.

By the same token a lot of people are going to leave the PS4 and play the Switch instead of the PS5.

Hiku said:
The_Liquid_Laser said:

This narrative is common, but the people who say it really need to do their homework.  The Genesis launched in 1989 and got slaughtered by the NES that year.  It also lost to the NES in 1990.  The Genesis never affected NES sales in the slightest.  But looking at the whole lifetime of the Genesis, it was in very close competition with the SNES.  The Genesis could not affect the NES, because it had too much sales momentum behind it when the Genesis launched.  But when the SNES launched, the Genesis was a cheaper system with a decent library of games already built up.  Lots of people bought the Genesis instead of the SNES for those reasons.  

Genesis hardware was similar to SNES, so developing games for both systems was not a big problem.
When a non-first party game is announced these days, you'll pretty much always see the PS4 logo at the end. But if the Switch logo isn't there, no one is surprised at this point, for Generation 8 games. And the process of making Generation 9 games work on the Switch is not going to get any easier.

A system's main selling point tends to be the games. And on that front, their libraries will surely only get more diverse as PS5 and Scarlett are released.
If you want to play a game like Resident Evil Remake 3, you'll probably need one of those systems.
And if you want games unique to Switch, or to play console level games on the go, you'll need a Switch.

There were some games on the SNES and Genesis that were the same, but there were also far more differences than the PS4 and XB1.  At least 80% of XB1 games are also on PS4, so they really look the same.  The SNES and Genesis libraries didn't have nearly so many identical games.  There are quite a few instances where the SNES and Genesis have two games with the same name, but they are actually two different games.  The game libraries were actually a lot more different back then.  But even though their game libraries were different, Genesis still attracted fans of the NES.

You are right that a system's main selling point is the games.  However Switch has lots of games and the rate they are releasing is still accelerating.  Switch has no problem getting games.  That means it will have no problem getting home console gamers either.  The longer Sony waits to release the PS5, the more home console gamers will go to the Switch instead.



The_Liquid_Laser said:

There were some games on the SNES and Genesis that were the same, but there were also far more differences than the PS4 and XB1.  At least 80% of XB1 games are also on PS4, so they really look the same.  The SNES and Genesis libraries didn't have nearly so many identical games.  There are quite a few instances where the SNES and Genesis have two games with the same name, but they are actually two different games.  The game libraries were actually a lot more different back then.  But even though their game libraries were different, Genesis still attracted fans of the NES.

Right. But I'm saying there were no obstacles for developers to either put those same games on the system, or games that look and sound significantly more impressive than what people were used to in the previous generation. The Genesis selling point was similar to that of the SNES. (Though personally I prefer the SNES' library, mainly due to its RPGs.)

The_Liquid_Laser said:

You are right that a system's main selling point is the games.  However Switch has lots of games and the rate they are releasing is still accelerating. 

I'm not saying it has few games. (Wii had lots of games as well.) But that their libraries are quite different, because of the hardware differences. And it's not going to get any easier/cheaper porting Gen 9 games. So if you want certain games, you'll need a certain system.
Developers still commonly go for higher budget games for the more powerful systems because there's a market for that as well.

Last edited by Hiku - on 21 September 2019