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Leak Reveals Gamestop Is Basically Shutting Down

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Hiku said:
SanAndreasX said:

Games at Walmart are under lock and key, so you have to go and drag down an associate to get them, and Walmart customer service is complete ass. For the most part, that isn't the fault of the floor associates as Walmart stores are almost always understaffed. There is no "in and out" with Walmart. Plus, the big-box stores tend to carry a limited selection of video games compared to Gamestop.

Our games have a security case on them, that they can open at the register. If no one removes it, it will trigger an alarm when you leave.
Why not use a system like that? They appear quite difficult to forcefully open. Impossible without some sort of tool at least.

Are people in the US really bringing tools to the store to break them inside the store? And so frequently that it becomes a problem?
I've never even heard of anyone ever doing that here.

As for limited selection of games compared to Gamestop, that's probably the case here as well.
But if it's a new game, they'll have it. So I mentioned it since Shadow said he likes to buy them early, or day 1.

I've never heard of it, but loss prevention is a big thing with Walmart with the volume of customers they have. That's how they've pretty much always been. There are stores here that use alarm boxes. 

As for new games, the big retailers generally limit their selection to the big name games from EA, Activision, Ubisoft, Take-Two, WB, or the console makers. You'll find Final Fantasy XV pretty readily at Walmart, but Dragon Quest XI is a bit more iffy, and good luck finding a Walmart that will carry something like SNK 40th Anniversary Collection. 



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Some sale stores will remain but in combination with other outlets. Shared retail space with hardware stores, post offices, amazon delivery center etc.



SanAndreasX said:
Hiku said:

Our games have a security case on them, that they can open at the register. If no one removes it, it will trigger an alarm when you leave.
Why not use a system like that? They appear quite difficult to forcefully open. Impossible without some sort of tool at least.

Are people in the US really bringing tools to the store to break them inside the store? And so frequently that it becomes a problem?
I've never even heard of anyone ever doing that here.

As for limited selection of games compared to Gamestop, that's probably the case here as well.
But if it's a new game, they'll have it. So I mentioned it since Shadow said he likes to buy them early, or day 1.

I've never heard of it, but loss prevention is a big thing with Walmart with the volume of customers they have. That's how they've pretty much always been. There are stores here that use alarm boxes. 

As for new games, the big retailers generally limit their selection to the big name games from EA, Activision, Ubisoft, Take-Two, WB, or the console makers. You'll find Final Fantasy XV pretty readily at Walmart, but Dragon Quest XI is a bit more iffy, and good luck finding a Walmart that will carry something like SNK 40th Anniversary Collection. 

I see.

Game selection for big retailers may be a bit different here then. Cause a game like Dragon Quest shouldn't be missing at launch.



It also had Dragon Quest Builders 2, and Dragon Quest Heroes 2.
I didn't find SNK Collection, but since it's almost a year old, it may be out of stock. They did still have SNK Heroines though.

But anyway, if large retailers don't have a particular title, then someone that loves buying the games in person at a store would have to resort to buying them online I guess.



hunter_alien said:
vivster said:

I can do a lot more with a digital copy I bought from steam than a physical copy I bought for PS4. Digital isn't the issue, DRM is. I think it's kinda ridiculous how physical discs are somehow lauded as gaming Jesus while they're full with DRM and already are just as tightly controlled as their digital counterparts.

The protest shouldn't be against digital but against closed platforms.

True, but the issue is that pretty much most digital platforms are DRM systems, to begin with. GoG is a model I fully embrace, but let's be honest, it's one that most publishers will not pursue, so it will always be a niche player in the industry.

Physical with DRM is absolutely an issue, and lately, they became downright cumbersome to use, but I think when most people say physical they refer to the old pre-7th generation distribution models. I think the Switch cartridges are still (mostly) there, but it's only a matter of time until they will go the way of the Dodo.

Still, gaming (as an industry) will get through this, and there will always be an opportunity in it that some will try to exploit, so who knows, maybe one day we will get the best of both worlds

It will only go down from here. Digital only gaming is inevitable. Not that it would make much difference considering that physical media is already basically useless on its own.

Cerebralbore101 said:

vivster said:

I can do a lot more with a digital copy I bought from steam than a physical copy I bought for PS4. Digital isn't the issue, DRM is. I think it's kinda ridiculous how physical discs are somehow lauded as gaming Jesus while they're full with DRM and already are just as tightly controlled as their digital counterparts.

The protest shouldn't be against digital but against closed platforms.

So, because I can't play a PS4 game on an XB1 that's DRM? If only GoG got as many games as Steam. Sadly, most publishers want to make their own store, or put their games on the EGS where there's always online DRM that bricks the game as soon as the servers go down. 

Yes that's one form of DRM. Other forms of DRM include: Not being able to backup media on your own physical storage, not being able to access content on the media, not being able to transfer digital content between consoles(offline). Physical is nothing but an illusion of freedom because they need an extremely closed platform to run on. It's kinda poetic that digital games on PC fulfill the desires of people who prefer physical much better than actual physical media on consoles.

KManX89 said:
hunter_alien said:

True, but the issue is that pretty much most digital platforms are DRM systems, to begin with. GoG is a model I fully embrace, but let's be honest, it's one that most publishers will not pursue, so it will always be a niche player in the industry.

Physical with DRM is absolutely an issue, and lately, they became downright cumbersome to use, but I think when most people say physical they refer to the old pre-7th generation distribution models. I think the Switch cartridges are still (mostly) there, but it's only a matter of time until they will go the way of the Dodo.

Still, gaming (as an industry) will get through this, and there will always be an opportunity in it that some will try to exploit, so who knows, maybe one day we will get the best of both worlds

This. 

Publishers will further push and get away with on-disc DLC as well since, you know, there will no longer be any discs. So they can get away with selling you stuff already in the game and locked in the code.

One of the primary reasons they WANT an all-digital future is so they'll no longer have to lie and cover it up.

But they're not lying about on disc DLC. They could very easily hide it, yet they don't. It's the same for installed DLC on digital copies. There you can also see if the DLC was already in the initial game. In fact it's way easier to detect those "lies" on open platforms with digital only media if they ever occur.



If you demand respect or gratitude for your volunteer work, you're doing volunteering wrong.

vivster said:
Cerebralbore101 said:

So, because I can't play a PS4 game on an XB1 that's DRM? If only GoG got as many games as Steam. Sadly, most publishers want to make their own store, or put their games on the EGS where there's always online DRM that bricks the game as soon as the servers go down. 

Yes that's one form of DRM. Other forms of DRM include: Not being able to backup media on your own physical storage, not being able to access content on the media, not being able to transfer digital content between consoles(offline). Physical is nothing but an illusion of freedom because they need an extremely closed platform to run on. It's kinda poetic that digital games on PC fulfill the desires of people who prefer physical much better than actual physical media on consoles.But they're not lying about on disc DLC. They could very easily hide it, yet they don't. It's the same for installed DLC on digital copies. There you can also see if the DLC was already in the initial game. In fact it's way easier to detect those "lies" on open platforms with digital only media if they ever occur.

 Not being able to play a PS4 disk on an XB1 is not a form of DRM. See the two definitions below. 

https://searchcio.techtarget.com/definition/digital-rights-management

"Digital rights management (DRM) is a systematic approach to copyright protection for digital media. The purpose of DRM is to prevent unauthorized redistribution of digital media and restrict the ways consumers can copy content they've purchased. DRM products were developed in response to the rapid increase in online piracy of commercially marketed material, which proliferated through the widespread use of peer-to-peer file exchange programs. Typically DRM is implemented by embedding code that prevents copying, specifies a time period in which the content can be accessed or limits the number of devices the media can be installed on."

Although digital content is protected by copyright laws, policing the Web and catching law-breakers is very difficult. DRM technology focuses on making it impossible to steal content in the first place, a more efficient approach to the problem than the hit-and-miss strategies aimed at apprehending online poachers after the fact.

Cerebral's Note: Limiting the number of devices media can be installed on refers to putting the media on multiple computers, not multiple brands of consoles. Just an FYI. 

https://techterms.com/definition/drm

Stands for "Digital Rights Management." DRM refers to a collection of systems used to protect the copyrights of electronic media. These include digital music and movies, as well as other data that is stored and transferred digitally. For example, the Apple iTunes Music Store uses a DRM system to limit the number of computers that songs can be played on. Each audio file downloaded from the iTunes music store includes information about the owner of the file and how many times the file has been transferred. The protected files will not play on computers that have not been authorized to play the music.

Digital Rights Management is important to publishers of electronic media since it helps ensure they will receive the appropriate revenue for their products. By controlling the trading, protection, monitoring, and tracking of digital media, DRM helps publishers limit the illegal propagation of copyrighted works. This can be accomplished by using digital watermarks or proprietary file encryption on the media they distribute. Whatever method publishers choose to employ, DRM helps them make sure that their digital content is only used by those who have paid for it.








The sentence below is false. 
The sentence above is true. 

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Well this blows if it's true. It really, really blows. Where am I gonna go for fun video-game based action figures and other geeky goodies besides BigBadToyStore?



Some days I just blow up.

I'm not a huge fan of Gamestop as a company, but I pre-ordered DQXIS there because the workers are fairly nice. I want my pre-order.



I'm not sad. Gamestop is regressive. Good riddance.



Well, this is new.

Read.

They should try and switch they business model. Going after the videogame market when it moves more and more to digital just won't and can't work.

Instead, they should focus on all the stuff you can't get digitally: promotion material, feelies, merch, and so on. Additionally, I would suggest them turning their shops more into retrogaming stores where you can get old consoles and videogames. And no, I don't mean something like an used PS4 (though one could still take those, especially for later on), more like an used SNES or Dreamcast and games from those consoles.

That doesn't mean that they shouldn't sell modern consoles anymore - just stop focusing on the modern and go for the retro.



The_Liquid_Laser said:
I don't think physical media is going away, but Gamestop may be another matter. I don't think they are managed well. Whenever I go into a Gamestop nowadays I see this tiny little section for Switch games with huge sections for PS4 and XB1 games. The Switch basically has the same shelf space that the Wii U did. Is it any wonder why Amazon always over represents Switch sales? Tons of Switch customers go to Amazon, because Gamestop is just not going to be their store. They can get the Switch games they want at Amazon, but not at Gamestop.

Surely Gamestop knows that the Switch is selling a lot better than the Wii U, but they haven't changed their behavior accordingly.

I had a similar experience on the ps3 360 era. Went to Gamestop there was basically 1 shelf with ps3 games while the rest of the store was green with xbox 360 games and posters. They didnt have the PS3 game I wanted so I basically wasted time going there. Customer service was always shit and they were always trying to shove some crap down my throat. Not to mention the games they sold were not sealed, meaning who knows if the game was actually new or not. Tons of shady little shit like that to try and f*ck the customers for a profit.