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What was the Greatest Launch Title of all Time?

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What was the greatest launch title of all time?

Combat 0 0.00%
 
Super Mario Bros. 20 12.20%
 
Super Mario World 19 11.59%
 
Virtua Fighter (Saturn) 2 1.22%
 
Twisted Metal 2 1.22%
 
Super Mario 64 32 19.51%
 
Halo Combat Evolved 16 9.76%
 
Twilight Princess 3 1.83%
 
Breath of the Wild 64 39.02%
 
Other 6 3.66%
 
Total:164
Azuren said:
curl-6 said:

No game released before BOTW really does this though. Sure, plenty of its forebears have physics, some even quite complex and awesome, but none of them wove both physics and chemistry together in a way that's truly organic and intuitive. Take the example I detailed above, in what older game would that happen?

Okami. Fire burns trees and ice, as well as lights torches. Water extinguishes fire and fills containers. Wind moves round objects, blows out fire, moves fans, and affects enemies. Then there are slashing maneuvers, bombs, sprouting trees, time dilation, changing the time of day by moving the position of the sun/moon or swapping them out... And these are all physics that can be used at any point in the games limited open world.

No, it isn't as organic as BotW, but it's also, what, ten years older? 

Look, dude, I'm gonna be the last person you'll ever see criticize Okami, but... you really can't compare its physics to Breath of the Wild. Like, just, don't.



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Gameplay mechanics and physics are not the same thing. Okami doesn't have much of a physics engine.



I haven't really played Just Cause (only played about an hour of JC 3) or Red Faction 3/4 but they're open world games that appear to be physics heavy.
Also, whenever I describe Dragon's Dogma to potential Switch owners as "BotW without horses".

Like many I see BotW as one of the greatest games of all time. There sense of freedom is unmatched compared to games I've played. It really feels more like a world that a game. Fantastic launch title...that you didn't need new hardware to play.

And that's what keeps it from being in the top spot. When you have a game like Mario 64 that offered an experience than couldn't compare to anything else and it was ONLY on N64, that pushes it to the next level for me.

I guess it's all opinions and it depends on what you're looking for in "The greatest launch title of all time". A game that does things other games have done INCREDIBLY WELL or a game that entirely breaks new ground and changes the industry (and is still a great game 20+ years later!).

Lots of consoles launched with that "Killer app". Not many have had the impact that Mario has, even today.



Twitter: @d21lewis  --I'll add you if you add me!!

Azuren said:
curl-6 said:

No game released before BOTW really does this though. Sure, plenty of its forebears have physics, some even quite complex and awesome, but none of them wove both physics and chemistry together in a way that's truly organic and intuitive. Take the example I detailed above, in what older game would that happen?

Okami. Fire burns trees and ice, as well as lights torches. Water extinguishes fire and fills containers. Wind moves round objects, blows out fire, moves fans, and affects enemies. Then there are slashing maneuvers, bombs, sprouting trees, time dilation, changing the time of day by moving the position of the sun/moon or swapping them out... And these are all physics that can be used at any point in the games limited open world.

No, it isn't as organic as BotW, but it's also, what, ten years older? 

Okami is a great game, but as Chrkeller points out, most of those are canned gameplay mechanics, not dynamic physics/chemistry as such.



curl-6 said:
Azuren said:

Okami. Fire burns trees and ice, as well as lights torches. Water extinguishes fire and fills containers. Wind moves round objects, blows out fire, moves fans, and affects enemies. Then there are slashing maneuvers, bombs, sprouting trees, time dilation, changing the time of day by moving the position of the sun/moon or swapping them out... And these are all physics that can be used at any point in the games limited open world.

No, it isn't as organic as BotW, but it's also, what, ten years older? 

Okami is a great game, but as Chrkeller points out, most of those are canned gameplay mechanics, not dynamic physics/chemistry as such.

Setting grass on fire to create an updraft is just as much a canned gameplay mechanic as  having to use wind to blow an orb into a goal. At some point you're just going to have to come to terms with the fact that the physics and "chemistry" of BotW, while very well put together, isn't anything that hasn't been attempted before and is in no way groundbreaking on the same level as Mario 64.



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mZuzek said:
Azuren said:

Okami. Fire burns trees and ice, as well as lights torches. Water extinguishes fire and fills containers. Wind moves round objects, blows out fire, moves fans, and affects enemies. Then there are slashing maneuvers, bombs, sprouting trees, time dilation, changing the time of day by moving the position of the sun/moon or swapping them out... And these are all physics that can be used at any point in the games limited open world.

No, it isn't as organic as BotW, but it's also, what, ten years older? 

Look, dude, I'm gonna be the last person you'll ever see criticize Okami, but... you really can't compare its physics to Breath of the Wild. Like, just, don't.

I did, because they're similar. One just has the advantage of being ten years newer. I wasn't comparing them as a way to say Okami is on BotW's level, only that similar physics have been explored in the past (and hell, it happened in a very Zelda-esque game, too).



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Check out my Twitch Channel!:

www.twitch.tv/AzurenGames

Azuren said:
curl-6 said:

Okami is a great game, but as Chrkeller points out, most of those are canned gameplay mechanics, not dynamic physics/chemistry as such.

Setting grass on fire to create an updraft is just as much a canned gameplay mechanic as  having to use wind to blow an orb into a goal. At some point you're just going to have to come to terms with the fact that the physics and "chemistry" of BotW, while very well put together, isn't anything that hasn't been attempted before and is in no way groundbreaking on the same level as Mario 64.

Actually no, I don't "have to come to terms" with your assertion, I reject it as untrue. If you're going to conflate a scripted interaction with the ability to apply physical and chemical forces freely throughout an organic world in a way that produces countless gameplay possibilities, then we may as well conflate Mario 64's breakthroughs with the implementation of simulated 3D in Mode 7 SNES games, and there's little point continuing this discussion.

Last edited by curl-6 - on 14 July 2019

Anyone else find it weird how Nintendo has some of the absolute best and lamest launches ever. The same company that had super Mario Bros, Mario 64, twilight princess, BoTW, Mario world, f-zero, Wii sports, Luigi's Mansion and Tetris as launch titles also thought it was a good idea to launch the 3ds with pilotwings.



collint0101 said:
Anyone else find it weird how Nintendo has some of the absolute best and lamest launches ever. The same company that had super Mario Bros, Mario 64, twilight princess, BoTW, Mario world, f-zero, Wii sports, Luigi's Mansion and Tetris as launch titles also thought it was a good idea to launch the 3ds with pilotwings.

I think it's more that their launches are almost always stellar and they just had a massive collective attacks of the stupids in the Wii U/3DS era.

There's a reason those systems are their worst selling console and handheld ever respectively.



curl-6 said:
Azuren said:

Setting grass on fire to create an updraft is just as much a canned gameplay mechanic as  having to use wind to blow an orb into a goal. At some point you're just going to have to come to terms with the fact that the physics and "chemistry" of BotW, while very well put together, isn't anything that hasn't been attempted before and is in no way groundbreaking on the same level as Mario 64.

Actually no, I don't "have to come to terms" with your assertion, I reject it as untrue. If you're going to conflate a scripted interaction with the ability to apply physical and chemical forces freely throughout an organic world in a way that produces countless gameplay possibilities, then we may as well conflate Mario 64's breakthroughs with the implementation of simulated 3D in Mode 7 SNES games, and there's little point continuing this discussion.

BotW physics is very limited and indeed has quite scripted feel to it in many cases.