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TallSilhouette said:

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1173368423381962752?s=20

https://twitter.com/TulsiGabbard/status/1173434704302751744?s=20

How tf do you embed twitter links on here properly? Never figured it out.

Delete the question mark and everything following it.



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sundin13 said:
Lewandoski is getting destroyed on national television right now. It is wonderful haha

So he gets caught in a lie (or he's just blatantly admitted to lying to the federal investigators) during this testimony...but during a break immediately after his opening statements the dude tweeted this:



Massimus - "Trump already has democrat support."

SpokenTruth said:
sundin13 said:
Lewandoski is getting destroyed on national television right now. It is wonderful haha

So he gets caught in a lie (or he's just blatantly admitted to lying to the federal investigators) during this testimony...but during a break immediately after his opening statements the dude tweeted this:

Sounds like the New Hampshire Senate seat is about to get a lot safer for Democrats.



HylianSwordsman said:
SpokenTruth said:

So he gets caught in a lie (or he's just blatantly admitted to lying to the federal investigators) during this testimony...but during a break immediately after his opening statements the dude tweeted this:

Sounds like the New Hampshire Senate seat is about to get a lot safer for Democrats.

Indeed.  I'm thinking who tweets about their potential senate run during the middle of a House Judiciary Committee?  And then admit to lying so blatantly in the process.

"I have no obligation to be honest with the media."

-Corey Lewandowski (R), candidate for Senator of New Hampshire.

Last edited by SpokenTruth - on 17 September 2019

Massimus - "Trump already has democrat support."

Jaicee said:

So the United Auto Workers are on strike against General Motors now for the first time since 2007. (Live updates here.) It's the largest strike action against an American company to take place in the U.S. since...the last time the United Auto Workers went on strike against General Motors in 2007. Nearly 50,000 workers are participating, demanding better pay and health care benefits, job protections, expanded profit sharing, and more. GM workers made huge sacrifices during the company's bankruptcy proceedings amidst the Great Recession, but the company has returned to making tens of billions in profits since then and the workers are wondering why as much is not reflected in their pay and benefits.

Thanks mainly to a wave of teacher strikes, the largest number of work stoppages, and of workers participating in work stoppages, since the 1980s was seen last year, and total number of unionized workers increased for the first time in decades. This year's totals could be higher. It appears we are witnessing a new trend toward the revitalization of the American labor movement.

I've got no further comment except to say that I fully support this action and movement unequivocally. I hope this trend continues.

I'm happy to see that America finally sees the value of unions and how to use them.

Machiavellian said:
Jaicee said:

So the United Auto Workers are on strike against General Motors now for the first time since 2007. (Live updates here.) It's the largest strike action against an American company to take place in the U.S. since...the last time the United Auto Workers went on strike against General Motors in 2007. Nearly 50,000 workers are participating, demanding better pay and health care benefits, job protections, expanded profit sharing, and more. GM workers made huge sacrifices during the company's bankruptcy proceedings amidst the Great Recession, but the company has returned to making tens of billions in profits since then and the workers are wondering why as much is not reflected in their pay and benefits.

Thanks mainly to a wave of teacher strikes, the largest number of work stoppages, and of workers participating in work stoppages, since the 1980s was seen last year, and total number of unionized workers increased for the first time in decades. This year's totals could be higher. It appears we are witnessing a new trend toward the revitalization of the American labor movement.

I've got no further comment except to say that I fully support this action and movement unequivocally. I hope this trend continues.

Yep, this will definitely make sure they move production out of the US as fast as possible.  They will institute some stopgate measure to get people back to work while they plan on moving production even more out of the US.  Should be interesting in the next 5 years how this all plays out.

If that was even remotely true, then Germany wouldn't have any car production plants for a long time anymore. But they still produce tons of cars, half as many as the US in fact, which are the second biggest producer after China.

Last edited by Bofferbrauer2 - on 17 September 2019

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jason1637 said:
TallSilhouette said:

How tf do you embed twitter links on here properly? Never figured it out.

Delete the question mark and everything following it.

ty



SpokenTruth said:
HylianSwordsman said:

Sounds like the New Hampshire Senate seat is about to get a lot safer for Democrats.

Indeed.  I'm thinking who tweets about their potential senate run during the middle of a House Judiciary Committee?  And then admit to lying so blatantly in the process.

"I have no obligation to be honest with the media."

-Corey Lewandowski (R), candidate for Senator of New Hampshire.

Currently New Hampshire is rated leans D or likely D depending on who you ask, but I'd bet if Corey is the R nominee for NH Senate, the seat will get moved to safe D by everyone.



Bofferbrauer2 said:
Jaicee said:

So the United Auto Workers are on strike against General Motors now for the first time since 2007. (Live updates here.) It's the largest strike action against an American company to take place in the U.S. since...the last time the United Auto Workers went on strike against General Motors in 2007. Nearly 50,000 workers are participating, demanding better pay and health care benefits, job protections, expanded profit sharing, and more. GM workers made huge sacrifices during the company's bankruptcy proceedings amidst the Great Recession, but the company has returned to making tens of billions in profits since then and the workers are wondering why as much is not reflected in their pay and benefits.

Thanks mainly to a wave of teacher strikes, the largest number of work stoppages, and of workers participating in work stoppages, since the 1980s was seen last year, and total number of unionized workers increased for the first time in decades. This year's totals could be higher. It appears we are witnessing a new trend toward the revitalization of the American labor movement.

I've got no further comment except to say that I fully support this action and movement unequivocally. I hope this trend continues.

I'm happy to see that America finally sees the value of unions and how to use them.

Machiavellian said:

Yep, this will definitely make sure they move production out of the US as fast as possible.  They will institute some stopgate measure to get people back to work while they plan on moving production even more out of the US.  Should be interesting in the next 5 years how this all plays out.

If that was even remotely true, then Germany wouldn't have any car production plants for a long time anymore. But they still produce tons of cars, half as many as the US in fact, which are the second biggest producer after China.

Not sure what Germany has anything to do with the US or even GM for that matter.  I am talking specifically about GM themselves and what they have been doing lately.  Just Ohio alone shows that GM is shutting down plants even though they are making huge profits.  Workers going on strike, demanding more money when they are already closing plants probably making them feel they are making the right moves instead of the opposite.



Machiavellian said:
Bofferbrauer2 said:

I'm happy to see that America finally sees the value of unions and how to use them.

If that was even remotely true, then Germany wouldn't have any car production plants for a long time anymore. But they still produce tons of cars, half as many as the US in fact, which are the second biggest producer after China.

Not sure what Germany has anything to do with the US or even GM for that matter.  I am talking specifically about GM themselves and what they have been doing lately.  Just Ohio alone shows that GM is shutting down plants even though they are making huge profits.  Workers going on strike, demanding more money when they are already closing plants probably making them feel they are making the right moves instead of the opposite.

While GM is making big profits, these come from the increased sales... overseas! GM is growing very fast both in Europe and in South America and has a huge market in China (GM sells more cars in China than in North America). As a result GM, just like any car manufacturer would do, built a factory closer to the customers (which also allows them to design cars specifically for those markets), hence why the one in Ohio, among others (Michigan and Oshawa in Canada got axed too, along with 2 engine plants), simply got redundant. The closure and the strike have nothing to do with each other.

In the US, the sales had been slumping down the last couple years. GM sold 5M cars in the US in 1999, dropped to 2M after the financial crisis, yet could regrow from there. But in 2016, they barely breached the 3M line and slumped back below that afterwards. In 2018, it was just clear that they wouldn't reach those sales numbers anymore they reached in the 90's, and thus had way too much production capacities.

Long story short, GM may be rolling in cash, but that one doesn't come from US or north american customers, for whom those plants were meant for.



Uhhh GMs financials completely beg to differ with your statement about where their money is being made.

In 2018, they made a net profit of $8.1B. In North America, they had a $10.8B pre-tax profit. They even clarified that they made $423M pretax on ALL international earnings. 95% of their earnings are here.

Let it also be known that approximately $500M of bonus checks ($10-11k/employee) was provided to all of the US employees as a result of these earnings...so it isn't like GM is just leaving these union employees hanging. The employees, however, want even larger bonuses. They speak of how many concessions they made during the Great Recession...yet they didn't have to pay a single penny back INTO GM when they lost boatloads of money.

They literally want to suck the company dry during good times, but to still be employed and we'll compensated in the bad times.



Money can't buy happiness. Just video games, which make me happy.