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The Official US Politics OT

Forums - Politics Discussion - The Official US Politics OT

Last edited by TallSilhouette - on 17 September 2019

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For the record, this is currently, IMO, the best comedy-news from the US - Colbert, Noah, Oliver, and Maher are all decent, but Meyers IMO is #1.

Last edited by Jumpin - on 17 September 2019

I describe myself as a little dose of toxic masculinity.

Jaicee said:

So the United Auto Workers are on strike against General Motors now for the first time since 2007. (Live updates here.) It's the largest strike action against an American company to take place in the U.S. since...the last time the United Auto Workers went on strike against General Motors in 2007. Nearly 50,000 workers are participating, demanding better pay and health care benefits, job protections, expanded profit sharing, and more. GM workers made huge sacrifices during the company's bankruptcy proceedings amidst the Great Recession, but the company has returned to making tens of billions in profits since then and the workers are wondering why as much is not reflected in their pay and benefits.

Thanks mainly to a wave of teacher strikes, the largest number of work stoppages, and of workers participating in work stoppages, since the 1980s was seen last year, and total number of unionized workers increased for the first time in decades. This year's totals could be higher. It appears we are witnessing a new trend toward the revitalization of the American labor movement.

I've got no further comment except to say that I fully support this action and movement unequivocally. I hope this trend continues.

Yep, this will definitely make sure they move production out of the US as fast as possible.  They will institute some stopgate measure to get people back to work while they plan on moving production even more out of the US.  Should be interesting in the next 5 years how this all plays out.



I struggle with the idea these workers have it so tough. They make $63/hour including benefits (pension, insurance, etc). If they really want more of GM's money (as they absolutely are profitable right now)...they are MORE than welcome to buy stock in the company, which might not be too reliable provided they went bankrupt 10 years ago...

Obviously it's easy for them to ask for raises when times are good (like now), but it seems like this is going to hurt GM in a big way when sales finally trend down in a recession.



Money can't buy happiness. Just video games, which make me happy.

I've worked for a union construction employer before (I was a non union employee in the office), and have mixed views on it. While it absolutely pays good wages to employees (and is good to see employees well taken care of), it increases the cost of construction massively.



Money can't buy happiness. Just video games, which make me happy.

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Jaicee said:

So the United Auto Workers are on strike against General Motors now for the first time since 2007. (Live updates here.) It's the largest strike action against an American company to take place in the U.S. since...the last time the United Auto Workers went on strike against General Motors in 2007. Nearly 50,000 workers are participating, demanding better pay and health care benefits, job protections, expanded profit sharing, and more. GM workers made huge sacrifices during the company's bankruptcy proceedings amidst the Great Recession, but the company has returned to making tens of billions in profits since then and the workers are wondering why as much is not reflected in their pay and benefits.

Thanks mainly to a wave of teacher strikes, the largest number of work stoppages, and of workers participating in work stoppages, since the 1980s was seen last year, and total number of unionized workers increased for the first time in decades. This year's totals could be higher. It appears we are witnessing a new trend toward the revitalization of the American labor movement.

I've got no further comment except to say that I fully support this action and movement unequivocally. I hope this trend continues.

Did you see this? https://finance.yahoo.com/news/hoffa-teamsters-stand-solidarity-striking-gm-uaw-members-165200840.html

Boo yah! Solidarity forever baby! I'm so proud of them.



Machiavellian said:
Jaicee said:

So the United Auto Workers are on strike against General Motors now for the first time since 2007. (Live updates here.) It's the largest strike action against an American company to take place in the U.S. since...the last time the United Auto Workers went on strike against General Motors in 2007. Nearly 50,000 workers are participating, demanding better pay and health care benefits, job protections, expanded profit sharing, and more. GM workers made huge sacrifices during the company's bankruptcy proceedings amidst the Great Recession, but the company has returned to making tens of billions in profits since then and the workers are wondering why as much is not reflected in their pay and benefits.

Thanks mainly to a wave of teacher strikes, the largest number of work stoppages, and of workers participating in work stoppages, since the 1980s was seen last year, and total number of unionized workers increased for the first time in decades. This year's totals could be higher. It appears we are witnessing a new trend toward the revitalization of the American labor movement.

I've got no further comment except to say that I fully support this action and movement unequivocally. I hope this trend continues.

Yep, this will definitely make sure they move production out of the US as fast as possible.  They will institute some stopgate measure to get people back to work while they plan on moving production even more out of the US.  Should be interesting in the next 5 years how this all plays out.

What a cowardly cop-out line. If cheaper labor makes them move overseas, they'd do it eventually anyway. This could accelerate the process, but who gives a shit? That doesn't mean the factories get demolished. An empty factory could be bought from the company by the union, and you bet your ass that I and countless others would definitely boycott the fuck out of GM and support the new American union-run factories instead of GM if they moved overseas, the whole "buy American" crowd would get on board, it would be huge. Can you imagine? Buying American made cars, knowing that every dime went to an American worker, because the CEOs that used to get the money went overseas? It'd be a damn satisfying purchase.

Of course, GM could avoid the issue altogether by staying here, NOT raising the prices on their cars, and instead just sharing more of the profit with the workers, and accepting that maybe the corporate board members don't deserve all that money.



TallSilhouette said:

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1173368423381962752?s=20

https://twitter.com/TulsiGabbard/status/1173434704302751744?s=20

How tf do you embed twitter links on here properly? Never figured it out.

That top tweet should scare the hell out of all of us.



Massimus - "Trump already has democrat support."

Lewandoski is getting destroyed on national television right now. It is wonderful haha



HylianSwordsman said:
Machiavellian said:

Yep, this will definitely make sure they move production out of the US as fast as possible.  They will institute some stopgate measure to get people back to work while they plan on moving production even more out of the US.  Should be interesting in the next 5 years how this all plays out.

What a cowardly cop-out line. If cheaper labor makes them move overseas, they'd do it eventually anyway. This could accelerate the process, but who gives a shit? That doesn't mean the factories get demolished. An empty factory could be bought from the company by the union, and you bet your ass that I and countless others would definitely boycott the fuck out of GM and support the new American union-run factories instead of GM if they moved overseas, the whole "buy American" crowd would get on board, it would be huge. Can you imagine? Buying American made cars, knowing that every dime went to an American worker, because the CEOs that used to get the money went overseas? It'd be a damn satisfying purchase.

Of course, GM could avoid the issue altogether by staying here, NOT raising the prices on their cars, and instead just sharing more of the profit with the workers, and accepting that maybe the corporate board members don't deserve all that money.

Not just that but the UAW workers accepted major concessions during the recession to help GM but now that profits are above and beyond what they were before the recession, they workers have not been equally compensated.

Further, as a simple show of good faith, GM should make a generous offer to the UAW for accepting the concessions in the first place.



Massimus - "Trump already has democrat support."