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The Official US Politics OT

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EricHiggin said:

Metaphors. Not for everyone.

Stop reading the WSJ? Times? CNN? MSNBC? FOX?

Shut tight. Rarely put anything out. > That's like, 'I always win, except for when I lose sometimes.'

And then there's leaky Comey, the former FBI director. Makes you feel safe doesn't it?

>Metaphors. Not for everyone.

Metaphors have to make sense. 

-An investigation isn't a two way street where you hit back.  

-Trumps interactions with the media wouldn't be a two way street, if he acted like more than a 5 year old.  

The world isn't out to get Trump, no matter how much conservatives want it to be so.  

>Stop reading the WSJ? Times? CNN? MSNBC? FOX?

Yep.  Do that.  Stop reading anything, if it makes you believe in conspiracy theories.  



Around the Network

Who knew Fred Durst would have been so prophetic?



The Canadian National Anthem According To Justin Trudeau

 

Oh planet Earth! The home of native lands, 
True social law, in all of us demand.
With cattle farts, we view sea rise,
Our North sinking slowly.
From far and snide, oh planet Earth, 
Our healthcare is yours free!
Science save our land, harnessing the breeze,
Oh planet Earth, smoke weed and ferment yeast.
Oh planet Earth, ell gee bee queue and tee.

the-pi-guy said:
EricHiggin said:

Metaphors. Not for everyone.

Stop reading the WSJ? Times? CNN? MSNBC? FOX?

Shut tight. Rarely put anything out. > That's like, 'I always win, except for when I lose sometimes.'

And then there's leaky Comey, the former FBI director. Makes you feel safe doesn't it?

>Metaphors. Not for everyone.

Metaphors have to make sense. 

-An investigation isn't a two way street where you hit back.  

-Trumps interactions with the media wouldn't be a two way street, if he acted like more than a 5 year old.  

The world isn't out to get Trump, no matter how much conservatives want it to be so.  

>Stop reading the WSJ? Times? CNN? MSNBC? FOX?

Yep.  Do that.  Stop reading anything, if it makes you believe in conspiracy theories.  

Dollars, cents, the bank accepts it all.

Then what's the obstruction talk all about?

If that's considered peace, harmony, and acceptance, conservatives aren't interested.

So the only thing I can watch is Alex Jones then? You're the boss.



The Canadian National Anthem According To Justin Trudeau

 

Oh planet Earth! The home of native lands, 
True social law, in all of us demand.
With cattle farts, we view sea rise,
Our North sinking slowly.
From far and snide, oh planet Earth, 
Our healthcare is yours free!
Science save our land, harnessing the breeze,
Oh planet Earth, smoke weed and ferment yeast.
Oh planet Earth, ell gee bee queue and tee.

EricHiggin said:
SpokenTruth said:

You obviously didn't read the report or watch the Mueller testimony before Congress.  Do you really want me to bring out all 10 instances of obstruction of justice or his testimony on it?

Above ^ READ CAREFULLY

SpokenTruth said:

My god, man.  You just validated my post so completely that I really don't know how to thank you.

This is called on the fly 4D chess.

I clearly point out obstruction, numerous times, then you point out how I don't know anything, and how you're going to show me all the obstruction evidence about it, and I purposefully pretend to know nothing about obstruction, when it couldn't be more clear that I did, based on what I said immediately prior, and you take that as gospel that I don't know what I'm talking about because 'I can't remember and completely contradict what I said within the hour'.

The fact you bought that, considering I bring up things from that past all the time, and how important solid evidence is, tells me everything I need to know.

A good investigator, like Mueller... would have pointed out the contradiction and asked for an explanation, not simply written a conclusion, like... Mueller?

You're welcome btw.

At no point in this conversation have you made any reference whatsoever to a specific incidence of obstruction.  You have not given any of us one reason to suspect you are aware of any of the details for any of them.

Oh, and he did ask for explanations.  Which is ironically one of the obstructions listed below because Trump refused to give explanations. But you knew that already, right?

But because you definitely need it, here is that list of the evidence you said I will provide.  Funny enough, that's the only thing you've been correct about.

1. Conduct involving FBI Director Comey and Michael Flynn.

In mid-January 2017, incoming National Security Advisor Michael Flynn falsely denied to the Vice President, other administration officials, and FBI agents that he had talked to Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak about Russia's response to U.S. sanctions on Russia for its election interference. On January 27, the day after the President was told that Flynn had lied to the Vice President and had made similar statements to the FBI, the President invited FBI Director Comey to a private dinner at the White House and told Comey that he needed loyalty. On February 14, the day after the President requested Flynn's resignation, the President told an outside advisor, "Now that we fired Flynn, the Russia thing is over.” The advisor disagreed and said the investigations would continue.

Later that afternoon, the President cleared the Oval Office to have a one-on-one meeting with Comey. Referring to the FBI's investigation of Flynn, the President said, “I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go. He is a good guy. I hope you can let this go.” Shortly after requesting Flynn's resignation and speaking privately to Comey, the President sought to have Deputy National Security Advisor K.T. McFarland draft an internal letter stating that the President had not directed Flynn to discuss sanctions with Kislyak. McFarland declined because she did not know whether that was true, and a White House Counsel's Office attorney thought that the request would look like a quid pro quo for an ambassadorship she had been offered.


2. The President's reaction to the continuing Russia investigation.

In February 2017, Attorney General Jeff Sessions began to assess whether he had to recuse himself from campaignrelated investigations because of his role in the Trump Campaign. In early March, the President told White House Counsel Donald McGahn to stop Sessions from recusing. And after Sessions announced his recusal on March 2, the President expressed anger at the decision and told advisors that he should have an Attorney General who would protect him. That weekend, the President took Sessions aside at an event and urged him to "unrecuse."

Later in March, Comey publicly disclosed at a congressional hearing that the FBI was investigating "the Russian government's efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election," including any links or coordination between the Russian government and the Trump Campaign. In the following days, the President reached out to the Director of National Intelligence and the leaders of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the National Security Agency (NSA) to ask them what they could do to publicly dispel the suggestion that the President had any connection to the Russian election-interference effort. The President also twice called Comey directly, notwithstanding guidance from McGahn to avoid direct contacts with the Department of Justice. Comey had previously assured the President that the FBI was not investigating him personally, and the President asked Comey to "lift the cloud" of the Russia investigation by saying that publicly.


3. The President's termination of Comey.

On May 3, 2017, Comey testified in a congressional hearing, but declined to answer questions about whether the President was personally under investigation. Within days, the President decided to terminate Comey. The President insisted that the termination letter, which was written for public release, state that Comey had informed the President that he was not under investigation. The day of the firing, the White House maintained that Comey's termination resulted from independent recommendations from the Attorney General and Deputy Attorney General that Comey should be discharged for mishandling the Hillary Clinton email investigation. But the President had decided to fire Comey before hearing from the Department of Justice. The day after firing Comey, the President told Russian officials that he had “faced great pressure because of Russia," which had been "taken off" by Comey's firing. The next day, the President acknowledged in a television interview that he was going to fire Comey regardless of the Department of Justice's recommendation and that when he "decided to just do it," he was thinking that "this thing with Trump and Russia is a made-up story." In response to a question about whether he was angry with Comey about the Russia investigation, the President said, "As far as I'm concerned, I want that thing to be absolutely done properly," adding that firing Comey “might even lengthen out the investigation."


4. The appointment of a Special Counsel and efforts to remove him.

On May 17, 2017, the Acting Attorney General for the Russia investigation appointed a Special Counsel to conduct the investigation and related matters. The President reacted to news that a Special Counsel had been appointed by telling advisors that it was "the end of his presidency” and demanding that Sessions resign. Sessions submitted his resignation, but the President ultimately did not accept it. The President told aides that the Special Counsel had conflicts of interest and suggested that the Special Counsel therefore could not serve. The President's advisors told him the asserted conflicts were meritless and had already been considered by the Department of Justice.

On June 14, 2017, the media reported that the Special Counsel's Office was investigating whether the President had obstructed justice. Press reports called this "a major turning point" in the investigation: while Comey had told the President he was not under investigation, following Comey's firing, the President now was under investigation. The President reacted to this news with a series of tweets criticizing the Department of Justice and the Special Counsel's investigation. On June 17, 2017, the President called McGahn at home and directed him to call the Acting Attorney General and say that the Special Counsel had conflicts of interest and must be removed. McGahn did not carry out the direction, however, deciding that he would resign rather than trigger what he regarded as a potential Saturday Night Massacre.


5. Efforts to curtail the Special Counsel's investigation.

Two days after directing McGahn to have the Special Counsel removed, the President made another attempt to affect the course of the Russia investigation. On June 19, 2017, the President met one-on-one in the Oval Office with his former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, a trusted advisor outside the government, and dictated a message for Lewandowski to deliver to Sessions. The message said that Sessions should publicly announce that, notwithstanding his recusal from the Russia investigation, the investigation was "very unfair” to the President, the President had done nothing wrong, and Sessions planned to meet with the Special Counsel and "let [him] move forward with investigating election meddling for future elections." Lewandowski said he understood what the President wanted Sessions to do.

One month later, in another private meeting with Lewandowski on July 19, 2017, the President asked about the status of his message for Sessions to limit the Special Counsel investigation to future election interference. Lewandowski told the President that the message would be delivered soon. Hours after that meeting, the President publicly criticized Sessions in an interview with the New York Times, and then issued a series of tweets making it clear that Sessions's job was in jeopardy. Lewandowski did not want to deliver the President's message personally, so he asked senior White House official Rick Dearborn to deliver it to Sessions. Dearborn was uncomfortable with the task and did not follow through.


6. Efforts to prevent public disclosure of evidence.

In the summer of 2017, the President learned that media outlets were asking questions about the June 9, 2016 meeting at Trump Tower between senior campaign officials, including Donald Trump Jr., and a Russian lawyer who was said to be offering damaging information about Hillary Clinton as part of Russia and its government's support for Mr. Trump.” On several occasions, the President directed aides not to publicly disclose the emails setting up the June 9 meeting, suggesting that the emails would not leak and that the number of lawyers with access to them should be limited. Before the emails became public, the President edited a press statement for Trump Jr. by deleting a line that acknowledged that the meeting was with "an individual who [Trump Jr.] was told might have information helpful to the campaign” and instead said only that the meeting was about adoptions of Russian children. When the press asked questions about the President's involvement in Trump Jr.'s statement, the President's personal lawyer repeatedly denied the President had played any role.


7. Further efforts to have the Attorney General take control of the investigation.

In early summer 2017, the President called Sessions at home and again asked him to reverse his recusal from the Russia investigation. Sessions did not reverse his recusal. In October 2017, the President met privately with Sessions in the Oval Office and asked him to "take [a] look” at investigating Clinton. In December 2017, shortly after Flynn pleaded guilty pursuant to a cooperation agreement, the President met with Sessions in the Oval Office and suggested, according to notes taken by a senior advisor, that if Sessions unrecused and took back supervision of the Russia investigation, he would be a "hero." The President told Sessions, "I'm not going to do anything or direct you to do anything. I just want to be treated fairly.” In response, Sessions volunteered that he had never seen anything "improper" on the campaign and told the President there was a "whole new leadership team” in place. He did not unrecuse.


8. Efforts to have McGahn deny that the President had ordered him to have the Special Counsel removed.

In early 2018, the press reported that the President had directed McGahn to have the Special Counsel removed in June 2017 and that McGahn had threatened to resign rather than carry out the order. The President reacted to the news stories by directing White House officials to tell McGahn to dispute the story and create a record stating he had not been ordered to have the Special Counsel removed. McGahn told those officials that the media reports were accurate in stating that the President had directed McGahn to have the Special Counsel removed. The President then met with McGahn in the Oval Office and again pressured him to deny the reports. In the same meeting, the President also asked McGahn why he had told the Special Counsel about the President's effort to remove the Special Counsel and why McGahn took notes of his conversations with the President. McGahn refused to back away from what he remembered happening and perceived the President to be testing his mettle.


9. Conduct towards Flynn, Manafort, HOM

After Flynn withdrew from a joint defense agreement with the President and began cooperating with the government, the President's personal counsel left a message for Flynn's attorneys reminding them of the President's warm feelings towards Flynn, which he said "still remains," and asking for a “heads up” if Flynn knew "information that implicates the President.” When Flynn's counsel reiterated that Flynn could no longer share information pursuant to a joint defense agreement, the President's personal counsel said he would make sure that the President knew that Flynn's actions reflected "hostility" towards the President. During Manafort's prosecution and when the jury in his criminal trial was deliberating, the President praised Manafort in public, said that Manafort was being treated unfairly, and declined to rule out a pardon. After Manafort was convicted, the President called Manafort "a brave man” for refusing to "break” and said that “flipping” “almost ought to be outlawed." Harm to Ongoing Matter.


10. Conduct involving Michael Cohen.

The President's conduct towards Michael Cohen, a former Trump Organization executive, changed from praise for Cohen when he falsely minimized the President's involvement in the Trump Tower Moscow project, to castigation of Cohen when he became a cooperating witness. From September 2015 to June 2016, Cohen had pursued the Trump Tower Moscow project on behalf of the Trump Organization and had briefed candidate Trump on the project numerous times, including discussing whether Trump should travel to Russia to advance the deal. In 2017, Cohen provided false testimony to Congress about the project, including stating that he had only briefed Trump on the project three times and never discussed travel to Russia with him, in an effort to adhere to a "party line" that Cohen said was developed to minimize the President's connections to Russia. While preparing for his congressional testimony, Cohen had extensive discussions with the President's personal counsel, who, according to Cohen, said that Cohen should "stay on message" and not contradict the President. After the FBI searched Cohen's home and office in April 2018, the President publicly asserted that Cohen would not "flip,” contacted him directly to tell him to "stay strong," and privately passed messages of support to him. Cohen also discussed pardons with the President's personal counsel and believed that if he stayed on message he would be taken care of. But after Cohen began cooperating with the government in the summer of 2018, the President publicly criticized him, called him a "rat," and suggested that his family members had committed crimes.



Massimus - "Trump already has democrat support."

Oh, I forgot to give you a key highlight from the Mueller testimony before Congress.

Rep. Ken Buck, a Republican, asked: “Could you charge the president with a crime after he left office?”
Mueller answered, “Yes.”



Massimus - "Trump already has democrat support."

Around the Network
SpokenTruth said:
Oh, I forgot to give you a key highlight from the Mueller testimony before Congress.

Rep. Ken Buck, a Republican, asked: “Could you charge the president with a crime after he left office?”
Mueller answered, “Yes.”

Mueller said a lot of things, some that contradicted his report that were pointed out in his final hearing that he used the same excuses over and over to ignore it, if he even remembered it.

After he's left office? After? What he did before he even took office was so bad, that they have to wait until 2024 possibly to get him? It's not like he's gone underground. One day I'll be a star.



The Canadian National Anthem According To Justin Trudeau

 

Oh planet Earth! The home of native lands, 
True social law, in all of us demand.
With cattle farts, we view sea rise,
Our North sinking slowly.
From far and snide, oh planet Earth, 
Our healthcare is yours free!
Science save our land, harnessing the breeze,
Oh planet Earth, smoke weed and ferment yeast.
Oh planet Earth, ell gee bee queue and tee.

Today I learned that there is a wikipedia article about how Donald Trump can't stop lying.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veracity_of_statements_by_Donald_Trump

That's a new thing. I mean what could anyone ever say to defend someone who literally said over a thousand lies during his presidency? Is the media lying about the lies? "But but but all politicians lie!" they say. Yeah maybe once a month, not over 10 times every single day. Anyone who supports this kind of behavior is quite simply an enemy of facts and truth. And any enemy of facts needs to be removed.

And don't start the bullshit about what things the media got wrong. They didn't get wrong thousands of things, so shut the fuck up. A handful of fuck ups does not make the media equal to a man with literally hundreds of fuck ups. Fuck-ups that one day will or have already cost human lives.



If you demand respect or gratitude for your volunteer work, you're doing volunteering wrong.

vivster said:
Today I learned that there is a wikipedia article about how Donald Trump can't stop lying.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veracity_of_statements_by_Donald_Trump

That's a new thing. I mean what could anyone ever say to defend someone who literally said over a thousand lies during his presidency? Is the media lying about the lies? "But but but all politicians lie!" they say. Yeah maybe once a month, not over 10 times every single day. Anyone who supports this kind of behavior is quite simply an enemy of facts and truth. And any enemy of facts needs to be removed.

And don't start the bullshit about what things the media got wrong. They didn't get wrong thousands of things, so shut the fuck up. A handful of fuck ups does not make the media equal to a man with literally hundreds of fuck ups. Fuck-ups that one day will or have already cost human lives.



 

I learned today that affordable housing basically not exist in some areas (not really news) but I came accross this picture.

By some considered as a poor house in the bay, it is not really for the poor but for people who can't buy a house or rent app/house in the bay area.

How much does it cost for a bed and stay for a month?  1200$ a month.  Expectations are that the price can go up to 2.000$/month in five years yikes.






https://old.reddit.com/r/politics/comments/d2wa6a/trump_again_said_he_helped_at_ground_zero/ezxae7a/

The president lying about a tragedy for political and personal gain. Isn't that the job of the liberals? What a swell guy.



If you demand respect or gratitude for your volunteer work, you're doing volunteering wrong.