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Leaving for college in two days... any words of wisdom?

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Don’t procrastinate! That was always my weakness in college, many a late night because I waited until the last second...

Also, kudos to you if you actually do end up being a principal. I use to think I wanted to do that, but after I became a teacher... there is no way in hell I would ever become an administrator. Their jobs are rough... they basically have to deal with the worst students and the worst parents all day long... I’m happy in the classroom, plus, I get the summer off unlike the administrators...



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Smile a lot. This came unnaturally for me but some people took the onus and smiled a ton at me, we later became friends.

Don't be surprised if your current friends turn out to be different people after living with them or spending a lot more time with them. Independence changes everything. You will probably have different friends by the end of college.



gergroy said:
Don’t procrastinate! That was always my weakness in college, many a late night because I waited until the last second...

Also, kudos to you if you actually do end up being a principal. I use to think I wanted to do that, but after I became a teacher... there is no way in hell I would ever become an administrator. Their jobs are rough... they basically have to deal with the worst students and the worst parents all day long... I’m happy in the classroom, plus, I get the summer off unlike the administrators...

Yeah I just want to be a principal because that's where the real money is in education (also I do have somewhat of a passion for it), and I've looked at the salary schedules for teachers of some school districts i'm interested working in, and I just have a hard time imagining being able to genuinely support myself, let alone anyone else I might pick up in my life. I would love to be a teacher for my whole career and may very well end up doing that, but I just might end up struggling a little.



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jason1637 said:
Tag. In the same boat as the OP and will read this later.

Class of 2018 represent!



Predictions for global hardware sales by end of 2017: PS4 - 70M. Xbone - 33M. Switch - 7M. 

"There is a need for parents to touch children first." - Tatsumi Kimishima, 2017

Here are some tips I've learned.

1) Have balance.  Balance work and fun.  Some people only do fun things like party, socialize, play video games, whatever.  These people fail out of school.  Some people only work and hardly ever have fun.  These people are really missing out.  Do both.  Have fun and be responsible.  Learn the proper balance.

2) Try to take about 1/2 gen ed. classes and 1/2 major related classes the first couple of years.  You want to work on your major while expanding your horizons.  (Again have balance.)  Lots of people change their majors while they are in college.  Other people get a 4 year degree and then come back to school a few years later wanting a different 4 year degree.  It is better to change your major than get 2 bachelors degrees, so take plenty of different kinds of classes the first couple of years to make sure your major is really the one you want.

3) Try to take a "fun" class every semester, assuming you have the elective credits to do it.  By fun I mean something not required that looks interesting to you.

4) If possible sign up for an extra class every semester.  Then after a week drop the class you like the least (assuming it's not a vital prerequisite that you need ASAP).  Even if it's a class you need to graduate, you can always take it later with a different teacher that you like better.

5) Always go to class.  This is the most efficient way to spend time.  Always do homework/study every day even if its only for an hour or so.  Some people prefer to cram for tests instead of studying every day.  This doesn't work as well, it will stress you out and you will forget the material afterward.  Instead study every day.  Obviously you will study more the night before a test, but you will be less stressed and do better if you also study every day.

6) Get all of your Math out of the way ASAP.  The longer people go without taking Math, the more they forget.  Get those Math credits taken care of ASAP. 

7) Try new stuff.  Colleges have lots of things going on.  Try different things that sound interesting.  Just don't forget to balance fun and study.

8) If you ever get in over your head, then ask for help.  There are lots of professors and counselors willing to help or point you in the right direction.  Most professors don't go out of their way to help, but will help if asked, and they know a lot more about the University than you do.  Universities are also full of lots of different resources that most students are not aware of.

Hope this helps.



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Don’t participate in any demeaning initiation ritual.



Poliwrathlord said:

I will be leaving for college in two days and will be living on campus for my first year at least. I'm going in freshman year undecided for my major but at this point I'm leaning towards a Bachelor's in History and trying to do a five year Master's in Education Administration, with hopes of eventually becoming a principal of a high school or an administrator at a university after teaching for 5-10 years. My financial situation isn't too bad; I've received the second highest level of scholarship my school hands out and my parents have set aside a decent chunk of money to help me out and of course I have student loans and plan on working part time. I'm also going there with my best friend from high school and we will be sharing a dorm together along with three other freshman who we've gotten to talk to.

rn

Just wanted to know if any of you older more experienced fellows had any advice or words of wisdom for me. 

It seems that most of the advice thus far concentrates on academic and/or financial success. Well and good; you'll need both. But that isn't everything, and so let me give you a little advice from my perspective (which is middle-aged with wife and child, for your reference):

* Understand that you cannot do everything.

You'll need to understand this, primarily, because your professors will not. They will each assign you copious reading, in apparent ignorance that you have anything to do in life other than attend their own class -- especially if you pursue history (which is also my undergrad degree). They will assign you so much that you could not read it all if you chose. Not and eat, and sleep, and (lord help you) work at your part-time job. Not and have a social life.

So one of the essential skills you must learn, if high school has not already taught you, is how to not do all of the crucial things that everyone requires you to do, yet somehow succeed anyways. It is something like "prioritization" and something like lying.

* Do not neglect your social life.

As important as it is to make certain you put in the time working on your theses, and etc., it is equally important to make the time to hang with friends, explore town, go on wild trips (I mean literally, but you do you), date, and generally goof off. This will come at the expense of your already stressed-beyond-the-breaking-point academic schedule. There is no other way. And yet it is absolutely vital for your development as a person and your collegiate experience.

* Be flexible.

It sounds like you have a rough roadmap worked out for yourself, and that's cool. It potentially puts you ahead of the game. But one of the things that college affords more than anything else is the opportunity to explore diverse paths. It's a wise idea to take core requirements for the path you suspect you'll pursue early, in case that's what you wind up doing, but -- especially in the first two years -- do whatever you can to give yourself as much breadth of experience as possible, in terms of electives, clubs, etc. You may well discover some passion that you had not ever expected. And if you do find that you yearn to go down some path different from the one you'd started, do not be afraid to make changes, even large and uncomfortable ones. It is easier now for you to change course than it ever will be again.

* Try to enjoy yourself.

This won't always be easy. There may be times when it is nigh-impossible. But college truly is a unique period of time... and I won't say that you'll never be so happy again (because hopefully you will, and even more so throughout your life), but you'll never be happy in this way again. It will always stand out to you in your memory as a singular experience. Or it will if you're like me. I would give nearly any amount of money to be able to experience college life again, but I know that even if I registered and so forth, it would not be the same at all. Once the magic is gone, it's gone.

So if you find yourself stressing badly about a class or a test or a paper, or some romantic situation, or your job, or housing, or whatever -- and you will stress about all of those things in due time -- just try to keep it a little bit in perspective, because you're about to dedicate yourself full-time to your own personal development, and the pursuit of knowledge, which is an amazing and incredible thing to be able to do. Have fun with it.



Poliwrathlord said:

I will be leaving for college in two days and will be living on campus for my first year at least. I'm going in freshman year undecided for my major but at this point I'm leaning towards a Bachelor's in History and trying to do a five year Master's in Education Administration, with hopes of eventually becoming a principal of a high school or an administrator at a university after teaching for 5-10 years. My financial situation isn't too bad; I've received the second highest level of scholarship my school hands out and my parents have set aside a decent chunk of money to help me out and of course I have student loans and plan on working part time. I'm also going there with my best friend from high school and we will be sharing a dorm together along with three other freshman who we've gotten to talk to.

rn

Just wanted to know if any of you older more experienced fellows had any advice or words of wisdom for me. 

My ex-wife was a teacher for a private school for 2 years in WY, then a teacher for a public school in IL for a year. She quit teaching after that and is now working for an Investment Company in UT and is about to acquire her CFA.

 

Her advice to me at the time was...

DONT BECOME A TEACHER

 

She regrets ever wanting to be a teacher, and feels she wasted not only her effort, but also years that could have been better spent in a different field. She said being a teacher in this day and age is nothing more than being a glorified baby sitter - and that parents are as equal to blame for shitty students because the parents think that the teachers are in the wrong.

 

Pursuing Teaching will be about as fruitful as pursuing Gender Studies. And only gullible liberal idiots pursue the latter...



Studying the day before an examination is a terrible idea, the learning process is progressive and it's better if you study a bit of what you learn everyday so when a test is coming you'll be able to study on a softer way cuz you already have somehow many concepts already ready in your head.



Always keep your eyes peeled at any job or internship opportunities that will complement your degree extremely well. Doing well in classes is obviously important and essential. But there’s no greater teacher than experience; Actually working and learning on the field as it is happening.


As someone mentioned before, talk to your counselor amd keep in consistent contact to establish that relationship.
More importantly, just do your best and give it all you got. I’m about to graduate this semester and what I’ve noticed throughout high school, but especially in college, the ones who succeed aren’t the ones who are smartest or most intelligent, but the ones who try the hardest and give it their all. Even if you fall short every now and then, that’s fine. Failure is just part of the journey, you’re gonna stumble and hit some roadblocks, at least you can be proud of the fact that you did your best and you can either decide to learn from mistakes to succeed next time or move on to something else. At least you won’t have any regrets or lingering doubts or ask yourself “What If?”

Finally, don’t hesitate to ask for help. Nobody succeeds alone. Everyone who has succeeded in school, work, and/or life has always had plenty of help and support from all the right people. Whether it be family, friends, teachers, professors, counselors, supervisors, bosses, whoever. They have all had people and contacts who opened doors for them, created opportunities, and set them on a path that leads to fruitful results. This is especially important as you get close to graduating and start looking for work with your degree or if you decide to go to another university to advance your degree. Whichever next step you decide is the best route for you and the next step you need to take, you should be able to know who you can reach out to and ask for help in getting you in that position.

Last edited by PAOerfulone - on 13 August 2018

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