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"Follow your dreams" is the stupidest advice ever.

Forums - General Discussion - "Follow your dreams" is the stupidest advice ever.

Dreams are for naive kids. Kids grow up and face cold hard reality. Life is not a Hollywood movie.



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DonFerrari said:
DélioPT said:

 

Ever saw these people preaching "follow your dreams, but only if they are feasible and you have the talent to achieve it"? Nope, they usually put in a way that you just have to believe and work hard for it.

Honestly, that's not how i have seen people say it.
When i hear people say that line, and only that line, it's said in a way to encourage others.

I really can't remembre it being said in another way - a way that implies that you can achieve it all.
Maybe that's me.



I disagree. I think you should follow your dreams, just have a Plan B in case it doesn't work out.

Just be smart about it. For example if you want to be a DJ or something, you can still do that, just maybe do it on the weekends or on your off time, in between your normal job and other responsibilities.  Just don't pour absolutely EVERYTHING into being a DJ to the point where you're buying new equipment instead of paying your rent.

Work on your craft and improve your skills. Then maybe one day that big break you've been waiting for will come along. And you'll be ready for it, instead of kicking yourself wishing you had worked more on improving your skills.

Last edited by Paperboy_J - on 08 August 2018

DonFerrari said:
Robert_Downey_Jr. said:
Someone needs to watch naruto

Naruto was son of 4th Kage and also from one of the original clans. Had Half the power of the most powerful monster inside himself. Is the protagonist, etc... nope, he already had all the requisite to make his dream come true. Why don't we ask about all the other who wanted to be Kage but were just worthless? They followed their dream and nothing.

What about Rock Lee?  He had no talent whatsoever and still became a mighty warrior through sheer hard work and effort!



DélioPT said:
DonFerrari said:

Ever saw these people preaching "follow your dreams, but only if they are feasible and you have the talent to achieve it"? Nope, they usually put in a way that you just have to believe and work hard for it.

Honestly, that's not how i have seen people say it.
When i hear people say that line, and only that line, it's said in a way to encourage others.

I really can't remembre it being said in another way - a way that implies that you can achieve it all.
Maybe that's me.

It's not just about how it's said, it's where and when as well. Not always, but quite often, it's on the red carpet or on a stage, part of some big time event, looked upon as a major achievement, where people's minds can be misguided into thinking what they are hearing, as well as what they are seeing, are directly linked. This is a problem. All it would take is another sentence to make it perfectly clear, but that could lead to the initial phrase losing it's glorified meaning. 

Some people can read between the lines, due to their intelligence or life experience, but many cannot. This is why it's important that people (kids) are taught to think outside the box, like questioning things that don't make complete sense, and not simply eating what they are fed. You don't need to "bite the hand that feeds you", but you should immediately be asking what's in the food if it doesn't taste right.



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Paperboy_J said:

I disagree. I think you should follow your dreams, just have a Plan B in case it doesn't work out.

Agreed. Or you can take other approaches like somehow combining your dream and the safer route or, like you say, slowly but working with a lot of commitment towards your wishes. So rather than "following one's dreams", I think it's more about "carrying your dreams with you", working hard for accomplishing one objective but never closing other possibilities of which you can become passionate as well. 



Of course you should follow your dreams. You just shouldn't follow them blindly, ignoring all sense.



DélioPT said:
DonFerrari said:

Ever saw these people preaching "follow your dreams, but only if they are feasible and you have the talent to achieve it"? Nope, they usually put in a way that you just have to believe and work hard for it.

Honestly, that's not how i have seen people say it.
When i hear people say that line, and only that line, it's said in a way to encourage others.

I really can't remembre it being said in another way - a way that implies that you can achieve it all.
Maybe that's me.

And have you ever heard anyone saying follow your dream with cautionary counters? If you don't limit the follow your dream then it really falls down on it will happen.

Paperboy_J said:

I disagree. I think you should follow your dreams, just have a Plan B in case it doesn't work out.

Just be smart about it. For example if you want to be a DJ or something, you can still do that, just maybe do it on the weekends or on your off time, in between your normal job and other responsibilities.  Just don't pour absolutely EVERYTHING into being a DJ to the point where you're buying new equipment instead of paying your rent.

Work on your craft and improve your skills. Then maybe one day that big break you've been waiting for will come along. And you'll be ready for it, instead of kicking yourself wishing you had worked more on improving your skills.

Perhaps you should read the OP. He puts very clearly that if you are passionate about something but isn't good enough or can't provide you money, do it as a hobby.

Paperboy_J said:
DonFerrari said:

Naruto was son of 4th Kage and also from one of the original clans. Had Half the power of the most powerful monster inside himself. Is the protagonist, etc... nope, he already had all the requisite to make his dream come true. Why don't we ask about all the other who wanted to be Kage but were just worthless? They followed their dream and nothing.

What about Rock Lee?  He had no talent whatsoever and still became a mighty warrior through sheer hard work and effort!

I love hard working and superation examples in Manga (and real life) just as the next guy, but using manga examples to show that hard work, works is silly =p



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I agree that this sentiment is foolhardy, but only because we have an incorrect focus when we talk about "dreams." The real thing people should do is follow what they are both good at enjoy. Then success shouldn't be so far off, because they will have the skill which they can nurture further through their enthusiasm.

I think happiness is an idea we can all strive for, so if anything (yes, even depressives can find ways through therapy and medication, etc), that's the dream we should be following. It will take work, and it might not be glamorous, but if we tap into what makes each of us special, whether we're really good at athletics or really good at cleaning, we can make a living out of it and enjoy the fruits of our labor.

But people have to reign in their expectations of those fruits just like they should be realistic about their "dreams." It takes work, and not everyone will be a millionaire dating models, so if we learn to be content with less, happiness isn't out of the question.

Okay, done be Confucius.



EricHiggin said:
DélioPT said:

Honestly, that's not how i have seen people say it.
When i hear people say that line, and only that line, it's said in a way to encourage others.

I really can't remembre it being said in another way - a way that implies that you can achieve it all.
Maybe that's me.

It's not just about how it's said, it's where and when as well. Not always, but quite often, it's on the red carpet or on a stage, part of some big time event, looked upon as a major achievement, where people's minds can be misguided into thinking what they are hearing, as well as what they are seeing, are directly linked. This is a problem. All it would take is another sentence to make it perfectly clear, but that could lead to the initial phrase losing it's glorified meaning. 

Some people can read between the lines, due to their intelligence or life experience, but many cannot. This is why it's important that people (kids) are taught to think outside the box, like questioning things that don't make complete sense, and not simply eating what they are fed. You don't need to "bite the hand that feeds you", but you should immediately be asking what's in the food if it doesn't taste right.

First, those situations are the exceptions, not the rule. And it doesn't seem fair to judge the basis or consequences of an advice based on exceptions.

What you said can be said for just about anything.
There will always be people who will think things will just come easy - even without such an advice.
That's why i think that telling people to follow your dreams isn't a bad thing to say, despite some people reading it the wrong way.

I understand that sometimes that phrase has a "glorified meaning", but again, it's not the rule. And reading too much that way makes you forget of the good that comes with people saying that.

DonFerrari said:
DélioPT said:

Honestly, that's not how i have seen people say it.
When i hear people say that line, and only that line, it's said in a way to encourage others.

I really can't remembre it being said in another way - a way that implies that you can achieve it all.
Maybe that's me.

And have you ever heard anyone saying follow your dream with cautionary counters? If you don't limit the follow your dream then it really falls down on it will happen.


 


 

Do you think that when people give an advice or offer a suggestion, it makes sense for that person to cover all the things that might go wrong/not work?

The advice in itself, is simple and, again, you can't stop people from reading it wrong even if you say "follow your dreams, but…"

As i said above, those that say it as if following your dreams is easy, are the execptions and that shouldn't stop us from using it or supporting it because of the possible negative effects.