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A Biased Review Reloaded - Radiant Historia: Perfect Chronology - The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild in Review One Year Later

Forums - Nintendo Discussion - A Biased Review Reloaded - Radiant Historia: Perfect Chronology - The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild in Review One Year Later

RolStoppable said:
JakDaSnack said:

That depends, the way you currently have it is confusing.  You make it seem like the game lost points due to a lack of replayability.  But then have to clarify that there is over 100 hours of content.  Wouldn't it just be simpler to just have one sections "value" and then give a description of what you mean.  

I won't be able to avoid confusion because my review scale already greatly differs from the norm. Most of that will be solved over time by writing more reviews and people realizing what colors and scores mean in the big picture. Right now there is a lack of points of reference, so I am not surprised that several people are going to think that I graded Breath of the Wild too low in one area or another.

That's cus a 10 point scale or grade system is clearer than random colors lol.  Regardless you still shouldn't have 2 sections for value, value is value, it doesn't matter how you get it as long as it's there.

Edit:

sorry that sounded harsher than I meant it. Just trying to point out that if there is confusion its likely because there is no point of reference to the colors like there is for a 10 point scale or grade scale.  And I don't recommend replay value because if you add replay value then people will assume that a game can only be good if it is replayable, which simply isn't true.  Otherwise your review was great.



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Super_Boom said:
pokoko said:

Why is that considered unique to BotW, though?  I mean, the first time I played Skyrim, I was over level 100 without ever beating the main story.  I mostly ran out and adventured on my own.  When the HD version came out, I replayed it and purposefully ignored the main story, to the point that dragons weren't even spawning (which was so nice), while I went out and became a vampire as soon as possible and played the entire game as the most evil thing in the realm.

I haven't played Skyrim in a while, but I thought I recalled there being several main quests required to complete the game. Sure you can ignore these quests and do your own thing, which is awesome (vampire poko arc sounds like the bomb), but there are still typically key milestones if you aim to complete it.

In this case, the game can be beaten without exposure to a single story event (well excepting the tutorial maybe). Probably doesn't matter to anyone that wants the full experience anyway, but making an open narrative on top of open progression leaves me with a sense of control that feels extremely satisfying. I honestly can't think of any other game that's captured this same feeling. It's completely Boom's World!!

Fair enough.  I understand what you're saying now, about the ability to proceed directly to the "end".  I'm replaying Fallout 4 now with an alternate start mod (my character started off as a raider with both the real protagonists (male and female) dead inside the vault) and I wish I could skip some of the steps involved in reaching the conclusion.  Though, it would be awfully nice if Nintendo put Zelda on PC so modders could get at it.  



F-Zero X (Wii U Virtual Console)

Last fall I reviewed this game and had to criticize a terrible conversion to the Wii U analog stick that missed some of the necessary nuances to properly control F-Zero X. Around Christmas time a software update arrived on my console, so I checked out what it was all about. Already on the settings screen for acceleration and max speed I noticed that the analog stick responded differently than before, so I was hopeful for a notable improvement during the race as well.

As it turned out, it's now possible to push vehicles with high grip ratings (A or B) close to their absolute limits, although a time trial test with the Twin Noritta (C grip) on Mute City 1 proved that the controls still aren't perfect. I was able to comfortably beat my previous best time by several seconds on the first try, but squeezing out the final couple of seconds missing on my N64 time might only be possible with a lot of dedication, if it's possible at all. The takeaway here is that F-Zero X is very much playable if you limit yourself to machines with good grip, but things start to get tough once you choose medium grip or worse.

You can see a lot of blue in the table below because F-Zero X is one of the best racing games ever made. This would normally be a 10, but it isn't with the playability that is offered on Wii U. The software update improved the controls to a point where I can safely recommend F-Zero X, even if this Virtual Console release still doesn't live up to the high standard set in 1998. An added bonus for gamers in the PAL region is that this version runs at 60 fps, unlike the Nintendo 64 original that was limited to 50 fps due to different TV standards.

Controls 10 Notably inferior to the quality on the Nintendo 64,
but no issues with vehicles that have good grip.
Gameplay   Futuristic racing with no weapons. The energy bar
doubles as your boost bar, so you have to weigh risks.
Story   Not
available.
Single-player   Grand Prix races against 29 rivals on short tracks
generate excitement due to the energy/boost tradeoff.
Multiplayer   Splitscreen for up to four players, CPU drivers can fill open
spots. A simple point system keeps track of the results.
Graphics   Most 3D games of the fifth generation haven't aged well,
but the priority on 60 fps really paid off in hindsight.
Sound   A rather small selection of music tracks boasts a few
classics, but not everything is on the same level.
Value   24 courses plus a random track generator, staff ghosts
in time trial, death race and local multiplayer.
Replay Value   Varied and good course design and the timeless boost
system are always good for another session.
Score 8 The hardware-related control issues put a damper on an
otherwise excellent racing game.


Legend11 correctly predicted that GTA IV (360+PS3) would outsell SSBB. I was wrong.

A Biased Review Reloaded / Open Your Eyes / Switch Gamers Club

The only way I see myself replaying this game is to beat ganon with no dungeons and no heart upgrades! It could be a nice challenge.



"I've Underestimated the Horse Power from Mario Kart 8, I'll Never Doubt the WiiU's Engine Again"

I really, really like this scoring framework. Well done.



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7th Dragon III: Code VFD (3DS)

This is technically already the fourth game in the series (II had two parts), but it's the first one that is released outside of Japan. It's not necessary to have played the previous games, because 7th Dragon III: Code VFD's story stands on its own and doesn't have more than a few loose references to previous titles. The video game company Nodens is scouting for capable fighters with a Virtual Reality game because the world is about to be threatened by the return of a True Dragon, namely the seventh one, VFD. You start off by picking one of four classes in a character editor, although it doesn't matter what you choose. Before you get to fight for the first time, you are urged to use the character editor again to compile a party of three and you can even get rid of your initial choice.

The battle system is classic turn-based style while the individual classes (a total of eight will be available eventually) have their unique skills. New skills are learned by freely distributing skill points to whatever you see fit, so planning ahead will pay off by the middle of the game. At certain points you will be able to permanently add a first and second backup party that can participate in battles in a limited form, either by granting stat boosts to your main party or an all-out super attack that allows all nine members to attack free of mana costs during a free turn; said attack requires several turns on standby to prepare, so it pretty much only comes into play during lengthy boss fights.

The meat of the game is clearing dungeons of dragons that are visible on the map and field screen. There are over 250 of them, so there is a lot of killing to do. While defeating a new kind of dragon for the first time is commonly an uphill battle and satisfying when you pull it off, it loses its luster when you are fighting the same dragon for the fifth time or more. The payoff for this repetition is a special dragon currency that can and should be invested in expanding the Nodens headquarters. But usually you only have a choice between up to three different things to build, so this isn't that big of an element.

The table below says everything else that needs to be said, but I think it's necessary to reiterate that 6 constitutes a good score. I do not regret buying this at launch. All of the DLC was free for a limited time, so I got all of it. You don't need to worry about missing out because none of the DLC offers anything important. Even the rewards of the quick money/EXP/skill points quests become quite meaningless once you are past the midway point of the game. If you are looking for another JRPG, this one is worth checking out. I was pondering if I should give it a 6 or a 7, but I went with the lower score because I don't want to become too generous.

Controls 10 Not much that can be done wrong in a game
that is mostly menu-based.
Gameplay   Turn-based JRPG with a party made in a character
editor. Freedom with skill builds.
Story   Centered around about a handful of noteworthy NPCs.
Relies on common tropes.
Single-player   Explore dungeons and clean them of powerful dragons.
Rinse and repeat.
Multiplayer   Not
available.
Graphics   Only serviceable character models and locations,
but still occasional framerate dips.
Sound   Definitely not Yuzo Koshiro's best work, but good nonetheless.
Sparsely used Japanese-only voice acting.
Value   ~25 hours for the main story, plus a post-game dungeon.
Short length is beneficial, doesn't overstay its welcome.
Replay Value   The dragon-slaying can already feel repetitive and a bit tedious
the first time around, so it's unlikely that you want to do it again.
Score 6 No glaring flaws, no outstanding qualities. A solid game that
satiates the appetite for JRPG. Nothing more, nothing less.


Legend11 correctly predicted that GTA IV (360+PS3) would outsell SSBB. I was wrong.

A Biased Review Reloaded / Open Your Eyes / Switch Gamers Club

Great review Rol, seems inline with my experience so far (edit: Talking about BotW here)!

I welcome the return of A Biased Review! Makes me want to go back to my Outdated Reviews.



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Picross 3D: Round 2 (3DS)

Picross 3D was one of my favorite DS games, so I was looking forward to this sequel. The goal is to uncover a figurine that is hidden in a big block, numbers on each side of said block allow you to deduce with logic which cubes needs to be removed. Newly introduced is a two-color-mechanic, so this time around it isn't sufficient to merely get rid of all unneccessary material, but the figurine also needs to be painted in the correct colors. A comprehensive tutorial tells you everything you need to know, additional expert logic is taught to you later on. So even if you have absolutely no clue what's going on when you first look at Picross 3D: Round 2, you aren't at a disadvantage.

Another major change compared to the predecessor is the progress structure. Whereas in the DS game you had to linearly go through easy, medium and hard puzzles - meaning that you had to solve over 100 easy puzzles before you were allowed to tackle something more challenging - the 3DS title not only allows you to pick the difficulty for each of the over 350 puzzles, but also provides access to a greater selection of puzzles at any point in the game. Puzzles are grouped together in themes they share and various unlock methods open up more and more things to do. Completed puzzles can be viewed in a gallery that provides a little bit of trivia.

The size of the puzzles can differ greatly, from the very early ones that consist of ~20 cubes all the way to the end to a beastly 1,000. Unsurprisingly, the time it takes to complete a puzzle can vary from under a minute to around an hour. Depending on the difficulty you choose, your score upon completion will receive different multipliers; you also get penalized for making mistakes or taking too much time. According to your score, you are awarded with gems. Points and gems are two of many ways to unlock more puzzles.

Picross 3D: Round 2 is one of those games that make you think "just one more level" on a regular basis. An excellent purchase for everyone who wants to work their brain.

Controls 10 Uses a combination of touchscreen and buttons.
Controls work for both left-handed and right-handed people.
Gameplay   Picross in 3D. The third dimension adds another layer
and requires different methods of logic than the 2D version.
Story   Not
available.
Single-player   The progress structure allows you to choose from a big variety
of puzzles. Difficulty can be adjusted for all puzzles.
Multiplayer   Not
available.
Graphics   A functional look that works almost all the time. Numbers in
circles and squares can appear fuzzy in huge puzzles.
Sound   Satisfying sound effects when removing blocks.
Music can get old fast, but can be turned off.
Value   Over 350 puzzles to solve.
amiibo unlock more, but don't count towards completion.
Replay Value   Puzzles are not particularly replayable in general, but
releases are so rare that there is not much of a choice.
Score 9 A sequel that irons out the kinks of the original and expands
the possibilities with a second color. Highly addictive.


Legend11 correctly predicted that GTA IV (360+PS3) would outsell SSBB. I was wrong.

A Biased Review Reloaded / Open Your Eyes / Switch Gamers Club

onionberry said:
Random_Matt said:
So how does the weapon system work in Zelda?
Isn't there the usual boomerang, catapult, bow etc anymore?

those items are there from the beginning, with durability. You don't need to finish a dungeon for a new item, imagine skyrim with zelda items.

 

RolStoppable said:
Slarvax said:

No mention of weapon durability? That deserves a trigger warning. Also, the reward for all 900 korok seeds is literally shit.

I didn't mention the lack of a playable female character either. Why should I?

 

RolStoppable said:
Slarvax said:

No mention of weapon durability? That deserves a trigger warning. Also, the reward for all 900 korok seeds is literally shit.

I didn't mention the lack of a playable female character either. Why should I?

Personally, I think the review you have given is pretty good but that said the mention of a lack of a female character is not important. What is important is "Slarvax's" mention of the weapon durability mechanic.

I have seen reviews where the weapon durability is to be lauded and in others condemned. Personally, I don't have any issue with weapon durability and think it does add a more realist feel to a game if it is done correctly and IMHO it is not done correctly at least in the early stages of this game.

Pausing a game in the middle of a fight to change weapons because your last one broke is just busy work and breaks the immersion (the Souls games don't allow pausing). This would be acceptable if this type of thing happened once but multiple times during the same fight is not acceptable.

Games like the Souls series and The Witcher 3 (just to name a few) have the concept of weapon degradation and the requirement of weapon maintenance which is very easy to do since you can use repair kits in the field or visit a blacksmith as a priority when entering a town.



nitus10 said:

Personally, I think the review you have given is pretty good but that said the mention of a lack of a female character is not important. What is important is "Slarvax's" mention of the weapon durability mechanic.

I have seen reviews where the weapon durability is to be lauded and in others condemned. Personally, I don't have any issue with weapon durability and think it does add a more realist feel to a game if it is done correctly and IMHO it is not done correctly at least in the early stages of this game.

Pausing a game in the middle of a fight to change weapons because your last one broke is just busy work and breaks the immersion (the Souls games don't allow pausing). This would be acceptable if this type of thing happened once but multiple times during the same fight is not acceptable.

Games like the Souls series and The Witcher 3 (just to name a few) have the concept of weapon degradation and the requirement of weapon maintenance which is very easy to do since you can use repair kits in the field or visit a blacksmith as a priority when entering a town.

You need to pause the game in Breath of the Wild to heal yourself. Since nobody has mentioned this as immersion-breaking in the three weeks since its release, I don't buy into the argument that changing your weapon is immersion-breaking one bit, because consistent logic is not present. This is why the argument of immersion-breaking reeks of desperation to find flaws in Breath of the Wild and why I put it on the same level as criticism from feminists/social justice warriors. Treating such arguments with respect would give the impression that there is merit to them, but there won't be respect coming from my side if the other side is the first one who isn't respectful. You reap what you sow.

I know why there's no consistent logic on the topic of immersion-breaking gameplay. It's because people realize that consistent logic would expose how ridiculous their argument is. People are free to complain about the weapon durability in Zelda, but I am free to ignore problems that do not exist in my reviews. I am not going to address hypothetical problems that somebody somewhere might have, because I neither want to waste my or the readers' time. Regarding the weapon durability in Breath of the Wild we've had people play the game for a full two weeks with no major complaints before all of a sudden it became something that needed to be talked about. If it truly had been a problem, then it would have been talked about from day one because it's a gameplay mechanic that is present throughout the entire game and not something that is only introduced way down the line. And yes, I assign higher value to the opinions of people with first hand experience than those people who haven't played the game. It's the latter group that is responsible for the majority of complaints and concerns, that shouldn't be forgotten.



Legend11 correctly predicted that GTA IV (360+PS3) would outsell SSBB. I was wrong.

A Biased Review Reloaded / Open Your Eyes / Switch Gamers Club