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What does it take to become a US citizen?

Forums - General Discussion - What does it take to become a US citizen?

So guys I have a good cause I would like some answers to that Google has failed me on.

I have a friend who has said it is too expensive for them to become a citizen.  They work in a government building and suffer from many restrictions due to this lack of citizenship.  They have lived in the US for about 17 years (believe they said they moved here when they were 6 from Kuwait).  They went to college with me and I was thinking of forwarding money to them to give them the leeway to become a citizen.  I have seen ranges from $700 to $15,000 for what this would cost.  If it's closer to the lower number I could easily afford it but I'm wondering if their situation would be the higher or lower cost if I need more info to figure it out.



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I recently got mine here is an excerpt from my documents:

Department of Homeland Security
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
M-479
Current Naturalization Fees
The fee for filing your naturalization application is:*
$595.00
The biometric services fee for having your fingerprints taken is:**
$ 85.00
Total:
$680.00
You must send the $680.00 fee with your application. Pay the fee with a check or money order drawn on a U.S. bank payable to the
Department of Homeland Security
. Do not use the initials DHS or
USDHS.
Do Not Send Cash.
You may also pay using a credit card. There is no additional fee when you do so. The N-400 is the only
form that you can pay for by credit card using the G-1450, Authorization for Credit Card Transaction.
Check www.uscis.gov for more specific information.



Does the college offer any resource or info to help him? Hope everything works out ok!



Apparently just show up in large enough numbers under a democratic president and you stand a pretty good chance of being granted amnesty.



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You also need to prepare for a quiz on various elements of US history and government. My entire family, myself included, are immigrants, and I've previously helped my father and brother with their studies in this regard.



bet: lost

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HylianYoshi said:
You also need to prepare for a quiz on various elements of US history and government. My entire family, myself included, are immigrants, and I've previously helped my father and brother with their studies in this regard.

How difficult is it to get in overall? Do you certain qualifications or a job lined up?



celador said:
HylianYoshi said:
You also need to prepare for a quiz on various elements of US history and government. My entire family, myself included, are immigrants, and I've previously helped my father and brother with their studies in this regard.

How difficult is it to get in overall? Do you certain qualifications or a job lined up?

As far as I know, you must legally and permanently be living in the US for around 5 years before you can apply for a citizenship. I had the privilege of not having to go through the complete process, since the naturalization process was different for me (I was and still am a minor living in the country for most of my previous life). I'm not sure of any other qualifications. You are expected to be interviewed at some point during the process, but I'm sure it mostly if not entirely comes down to being able to pass the civics/English tests and provide proper identification.



bet: lost

HylianYoshi said:
celador said:

How difficult is it to get in overall? Do you certain qualifications or a job lined up?

As far as I know, you must legally and permanently be living in the US for around 5 years before you can apply for a citizenship. I had the privilege of not having to go through the complete process, since the naturalization process was different for me (I was and still am a minor living in the country for most of my previous life). I'm not sure of any other qualifications. You are expected to be interviewed at some point during the process, but I'm sure it mostly if not entirely comes down to being able to pass the civics/English tests and provide proper identification.

Oh, nevermind then, lol

Maybe I'll get lucky and marry an American girl



celador said:
HylianYoshi said:

As far as I know, you must legally and permanently be living in the US for around 5 years before you can apply for a citizenship. I had the privilege of not having to go through the complete process, since the naturalization process was different for me (I was and still am a minor living in the country for most of my previous life). I'm not sure of any other qualifications. You are expected to be interviewed at some point during the process, but I'm sure it mostly if not entirely comes down to being able to pass the civics/English tests and provide proper identification.

Oh, nevermind then, lol

Maybe I'll get lucky and marry an American girl

It cuts the required residency time by 2 years, so you better hope!



bet: lost

As a current U.S. legal citizen I shall break this down in 2 easy steps.

1. Take car

2. Leave America and go to a better country



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