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Are Westerners taking advantage of Japanese content creators? Fan Translations = piracy

Forums - General Discussion - Are Westerners taking advantage of Japanese content creators? Fan Translations = piracy

Ruler said:

 

 

pokoko said:
Do you know why anime is big in the west now? Fansubs. I was there back then, trading VHS tapes on the internet because Japanese companies wouldn't bring over anything over except Sailor Moon, Pokemon, and some horribly butchered versions of a few other titles with supposed mass appeal. They said there was no interest in the west in anything else. I had to trade for tapes of Hana Yori Dango that were recorded from television. I had to look everywhere for someone subbing Kodocha.
 

ehh no

and there are many many other animes from the 70-90s localized in the west

Most of these examples are western productions that ordered the animation from japan. And yes, europe did that. That is comparable to that todays Anime often are animated oin Korea these days - they are still japanese productions. Anime usually refers to stuff produced for the japanese market. I'm not sure that the examples you shown there even aired in Japan, they weren't localized as their production language was one or another european language.



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Mnementh said:
naruball said:

Jesus Christ, dude. Do you listen to youself? Do you realise when DragonBall aired? That was when hardly anyone even used the internet. And I addressed the point that anime like Naruto reached the west thanks to fansubs. Are you even reading anything?

'Harmony Gold USA licensed the series for an English-language release in North America in the late 1980s. In the voice dubbing of the series, Harmony Gold renamed almost all of the characters, including the protagonist Goku, who was renamed "Zero."[3] This dub consisting of 5 episodes and one movie (an 80-minute feature featuring footage of movies 1 and 3 edited together) was cancelled shortly after being test marketed in several US cities and was never broadcast to the general public, thus earning the fan-coined term "The Lost Dub."

In 1995, Funimation acquired the license for the distribution of Dragon Ball in the United States. They contracted Josanne B. Lovick Productions and voice actors from Ocean Productions to create an English version for the anime and first movie in Vancouver, Canada. The dubbed episodes were edited for content,[5] and contained different music. Thirteen episodes aired in first-run syndication during the fall of 1995 before Funimation canceled the project due to low ratings.'

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragon_Ball_(anime)#English_localization_and_Broadcasting

So before 2001 Dragonball got no proper broadcast. That's nearly 20 years.

Fansubs started in the early 80s. And funny you mention Internet. Early Anime-fanclubs distributed through copying VHS-tapes. Nothing with Internet.

And some more:

'Throughout this period it was considered socially acceptable to screen anime for an audience without consent as few companies had American offices, and of the few that did, the answer was invariably "no". Japanese companies made it apparent that they knew fans in the United States engaged in unauthorized distribution and screening, however knew that fans were not profiting. Japanese companies asked fans to help them publicize, for instance Toei Animation asked the C/FO to aid them with some marketing research at San Diego Comic-Con. Starting in 1978 Japanese companies tried to set up US branches, however with the exception of one movie, The Sea Prince and the Fire Child licensed to RSA/Columbia Pictures Home Video, realized they were not going to succeed in the US market and the last anime company branch closed in 1982.[2]'

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fansub#History

Once again America =/ world

I'm 30 now and when I was 10 Dragon Ball (dubbed) and Sailor Moon (dubbed) were pretty much all kids my age used to watch. DragonBall was huge around the world and it was most certainly not thanks to fansubs. It was the dubbed versions that most kids were exposed to.



naruball said:
Mnementh said:

'Harmony Gold USA licensed the series for an English-language release in North America in the late 1980s. In the voice dubbing of the series, Harmony Gold renamed almost all of the characters, including the protagonist Goku, who was renamed "Zero."[3] This dub consisting of 5 episodes and one movie (an 80-minute feature featuring footage of movies 1 and 3 edited together) was cancelled shortly after being test marketed in several US cities and was never broadcast to the general public, thus earning the fan-coined term "The Lost Dub."

In 1995, Funimation acquired the license for the distribution of Dragon Ball in the United States. They contracted Josanne B. Lovick Productions and voice actors from Ocean Productions to create an English version for the anime and first movie in Vancouver, Canada. The dubbed episodes were edited for content,[5] and contained different music. Thirteen episodes aired in first-run syndication during the fall of 1995 before Funimation canceled the project due to low ratings.'

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragon_Ball_(anime)#English_localization_and_Broadcasting

So before 2001 Dragonball got no proper broadcast. That's nearly 20 years.

Fansubs started in the early 80s. And funny you mention Internet. Early Anime-fanclubs distributed through copying VHS-tapes. Nothing with Internet.

And some more:

'Throughout this period it was considered socially acceptable to screen anime for an audience without consent as few companies had American offices, and of the few that did, the answer was invariably "no". Japanese companies made it apparent that they knew fans in the United States engaged in unauthorized distribution and screening, however knew that fans were not profiting. Japanese companies asked fans to help them publicize, for instance Toei Animation asked the C/FO to aid them with some marketing research at San Diego Comic-Con. Starting in 1978 Japanese companies tried to set up US branches, however with the exception of one movie, The Sea Prince and the Fire Child licensed to RSA/Columbia Pictures Home Video, realized they were not going to succeed in the US market and the last anime company branch closed in 1982.[2]'

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fansub#History

Once again America =/ world

I'm 30 now and when I was 10 Dragon Ball (dubbed) and Sailor Moon (dubbed) were pretty much all kids my age used to watch. DragonBall was huge around the world and it was most certainly not thanks to fansubs. It was the dubbed versions that most kids were exposed to.

Sorry, I'm german. In germany Dragonball was aired first 1999, thirteen years after japanese release:

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragon_Ball_(Anime)

Maybe you get it wrong because you're young (you're profile says you are ten years younger than me), but I can assure you that most Anime weren't available here in germany until around 2000. I remember that Akira was nearly the first serious Anime-production that got an release in europe. Three years later. It was because it was shown on the Berlinale. But still it was a unicorn back then, Anime was pretty unusual to be shown in germany and I assume in most of europe. That changed very slowly.

You may have seen a dubbed Dragonball in TV at a young age - but at that time the series was already more than ten years old. In all that time in the 80s the fansub-scene already existed by exchanging video-tapes - no internet needed.



3DS-FC: 4511-1768-7903 (Mii-Name: Mnementh), Nintendo-Network-ID: Mnementh, Switch: SW-7706-3819-9381 (Mnementh)

my greatest games: 2017, 2018

Predictions: Switch / Switch vs. XB1 in the US / Three Houses first quarter

Keep working on that Persona 2 translation TradukoSoft





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I have a Crunchyroll sub, but I download anime as well, and read translated manga. I'm not big on buying anime BluRays and DVDs and most of the anime I like isn't distributed in Europe anyway. I'm also not keen on imports and I don't collect merchandise. I know I'm not a big enough supporter considering how much anime means in my life, but most of the games I buy are Japanese (and Nintendo) so it's not like some of my money doesn't end up in Japan.

Anyway, I have nothing but giant respect for translation groups (jobs that entail a lot more than just translating), what they do, they do out of love.



Mnementh said:
naruball said:

Once again America =/ world

I'm 30 now and when I was 10 Dragon Ball (dubbed) and Sailor Moon (dubbed) were pretty much all kids my age used to watch. DragonBall was huge around the world and it was most certainly not thanks to fansubs. It was the dubbed versions that most kids were exposed to.

Sorry, I'm german. In germany Dragonball was aired first 1999, thirteen years after japanese release:

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragon_Ball_(Anime)

Maybe you get it wrong because you're young (you're profile says you are ten years younger than me), but I can assure you that most Anime weren't available here in germany until around 2000. I remember that Akira was nearly the first serious Anime-production that got an release in europe. Three years later. It was because it was shown on the Berlinale. But still it was a unicorn back then, Anime was pretty unusual to be shown in germany and I assume in most of europe. That changed very slowly.

You may have seen a dubbed Dragonball in TV at a young age - but at that time the series was already more than ten years old. In all that time in the 80s the fansub-scene already existed by exchanging video-tapes - no internet needed.

Never said you weren't German. Your argument was that Dragon Ball didn't air in the West until 2000, which is false. Maybe that's the case in America. It clearly became popular because of the dubbed versions. Same with Sailor Moon. I know that in France DragonBall GT had ended when in Greece/Cyrpus we were still watching Dragon Ball (not even Z). You can believe whatever you want. Had it not been for the dubbed versions, Dragon Ball would have remained niche. Other anime are a different case.



If it wasn't for fansubs, I'd have never really bothered diving into watching anime that wasn't dubbed.



                                       

Ruler said:
They translate and make a patch without permission from japanese content creator. What do you think this fan translation is being used on? on pirated copies

You do realise that it's possible to get ROMs legally, right? It's legal in many countries to extract the ROM of a game and store it on your computer - as long as you own the game itself, and don't distribute the ROM, you're fine. It's not up to the fan translator to control whether the patch is applied to a ROM legally acquired, or illegally pirated.

Making a patch doesn't require permission, if the patch is free and doesn't contain infringing content. Word translation isn't really infringing, any more than it would be infringing for someone to read out the words of a game to a friend.



I use to buy original translated Mangas but I got burned by a couple of titles getting dropped because they weren't selling well or the publishers did something silly that got them bankrupt. I just gave up and went with the freaking flow of reading the stuff online.

I just buy the merchandise instead.