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Can someone explain Fallout 3 to me please...

Forums - Gaming Discussion - Can someone explain Fallout 3 to me please...

RadiantDanceMachine said:

4. Clunky - Deliberately so, that's why V.A.T.S. exists.

5. Empty world - consistent with a nuclear fallout...


I sincerely doubt number four is actually true, but invite any source to the contrary.

Regarding number five though, that's indisputably untrue. Leaving aside how it's been over two centuries since the nuclear war, Fallout 1 and 2 were both much more full of people and places, and 1 took place within 80 years of the apocalypse rather than the 200 years or so that's the setting of 3. The truth is the sparsity is the result of the game engine, although even New Vegas was less empty than 3.



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Some of those criticisms are fair but there are quite a few positives with the game ...

It has a more than appropriate atmosphere and there's always a sense of adventure. The unparalleled amount of freedom in the game mechanics and the somewhat memorable story really makes it a worthwhile experience ...

The animations, character movement, and the combat (particularly the gunplay) are definitely clunky though ...



Wasn't for me, either. I'm wondering if Fallout 4 will be worth my time.



Twitter: @d21lewis  --I'll add you if you add me!!

World building, freedom and atmosphere are the things it does well. I definitely preferred New Vegas though because it had all that, plus much better writing and some minor gameplay improvements.



Wagram said:
You're not alone. Personally, I find Fallout to be incredibly janky, and not a satisfying experience. However, I respect its popularity despite my deep hatred for Bethesda releasing unfinished games; which Fallout 4 will be.

Maybe I'm being overly optimistic, but I think fallout 4 actually has a decent shot at being one of the more polished bethesda games at launch. Considering the game was essentially finished when they revealed it, around 5 months will have been solely dedicated to bug fixes and refinements. I'd actually be impressed if it managed to be broken at release.



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SvennoJ said:
Exploration, and I like the atmosphere. Little things like finding a working text adventure running on an old terminal in an abandoned building make the game for me. I like empty space in open world games. There's no satisfaction in finding something if you don't have to look and get bombarded with distractions all the time.


I'm 100% with you. I for one loved farcry 2, despite the boredom many felt. I just got lost in the world. Then 3 came out and there was just too much on the map. It became an exercise of opening the map, moving to a point, picking up an item, repeating. 

A bit of boredom sometimes allows you to take in the world a bit more imo 



dyremose said:
It is one of my favourite games ever. And I don't even like rpg's in general.

What sets it apart to me is the atmosphere and story.
Every place tells a tale. Walk into a room and often you can piece together what happened, find audio snippets or logs about the days before, it just has so much attention to detail that it immerses you in its world.

The games themselves are taking place in what the people in the sixties would think our world would be like today after a nuclear Holocaust. This means laser weapons, robots and hover cars, Intelligent AI but with old monitors and OS's. It's just really imaginative a lot of these things when you see it in action.

A lot of it comes from the little things though. You are basically learning a whole new world and need to cut off your knowledge to modern society. Looting money is pointless as the currency is now bottle caps for example. It's just something you have to loose yourself in and it is a game best enjoyed while deviating from the main path and explore instead. That's where the real meat in this game is

Was going to write my own response but this says it all. Definitely one of my favourite games ever.



dyremose said:
It is one of my favourite games ever. And I don't even like rpg's in general.

What sets it apart to me is the atmosphere and story.
Every place tells a tale. Walk into a room and often you can piece together what happened, find audio snippets or logs about the days before, it just has so much attention to detail that it immerses you in its world.

The games themselves are taking place in what the people in the sixties would think our world would be like today after a nuclear Holocaust. This means laser weapons, robots and hover cars, Intelligent AI but with old monitors and OS's. It's just really imaginative a lot of these things when you see it in action.

A lot of it comes from the little things though. You are basically learning a whole new world and need to cut off your knowledge to modern society. Looting money is pointless as the currency is now bottle caps for example. It's just something you have to loose yourself in and it is a game best enjoyed while deviating from the main path and explore instead. That's where the real meat in this game is

I remember that one place that you enter and find a skeleton lying on the floor while holding two cases of bullets with a gun close by it's side, right by the entrace, the skeleton is right there in front of you when you enter the place.

I thought to myself: "Well, the game designers just wanted me to grab some ammo so they put that there for no special reason, like it goes for most games".

Then I go inside, and I pick up and hear the audio logs and hear the narration of a man as he struggled to stay alive against the feral ghouls that took over the place.

The last audio log had him saying how he would grab the remaining ammo and run outside to get away from the danger.

Once I finished raiding the place, I was ready to leave and headed back to the entrace. I looked back at the skeleton holding unto those ammo cases and that random skeleton didn't look so random anymore. That skeleton now had a story and seeing him lying there told the end of that story, without audio logs and without anyone having to tell me what happened. That man was killed right before he could escape the place.

That is a whole different level of storytelling.



Nintendo is selling their IPs to Microsoft and this is true because:

http://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/thread.php?id=221391&page=1

Let me summarize.

Different strokes for different folks.



AbbathTheGrim said:

I remember that one place that you enter and find a skeleton lying on the floor while holding two cases of bullets with a gun close by it's side, right by the entrace, the skeleton is right there in front of you when you enter the place.

I thought to myself: "Well, the game designers just wanted me to grab some ammo so they put that there for no special reason, like it goes for most games".

Then I go inside, and I pick up and hear the audio logs and hear the narration of a man as he struggled to stay alive against the feral ghouls that took over the place.

The last audio log had him saying how he would grab the remaining ammo and run outside to get away from the danger.

Once I finished raiding the place, I was ready to leave and headed back to the entrace. I looked back at the skeleton holding unto those ammo cases and that random skeleton didn't look so random anymore. That skeleton now had a story and seeing him lying there told the end of that story, without audio logs and without anyone having to tell me what happened. That man was killed right before he could escape the place.

That is a whole different level of storytelling.

Fallout is full of discoveries like that, which is what makes it so much fun to explore.  Like you said, most other games, it's like the developers just dropped random stuff and left it at that but Fallout makes you interested in what happened.  The series has personality where most developers just throw more of the same at you.  

Like when you get that distress call and you go to place mentioned but there are just ghouls trapped inside, which makes you realize that those ghouls were once humans desperate for help.  Or that place--it might have been with the DLC, I can't remember--that was literally straight out of Lovecraft, with the logs of the people who died inside.  It's not just wandering from location to location and killing stuff.