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Recommend me a great PC rig

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My unit cost me about $1600, and I had to put it together myself. That's pretty much how much you need to spend in order to get anything close to what you're asking for in option to of the OP.
 
As others have suggested, PCpartpicker is pretty great. BUT one thing you gotta know about putting together your own PC is that pretty much everyone makes some sort of mistake their first time. Every single person I've ever talked to about it has. I got a power supply that couldn't power the GTX 980 I got, so I had to buy another one which set me back a bit.



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nuckles87 said:

My unit cost me about $1600, and I had to put it together myself. That's pretty much how much you need to spend in order to get anything close to what you're asking for in option to of the OP.
 
As others have suggested, PCpartpicker is pretty great. BUT one thing you gotta know about putting together your own PC is that pretty much everyone makes some sort of mistake their first time. Every single person I've ever talked to about it has. I got a power supply that couldn't power the GTX 980 I got, so I had to buy another one which set me back a bit.

Happy to say I did not.  Other than my GTX 260 dropping $100 in price less than a year later.  



greenmedic88 said:
$500-700 is considered budget level PC gaming.

No one builds a gaming PC with anything approaching a 10 year life expectancy, even for actual top of the line systems that run in excess of several thousand dollars.

This is very realistically what a $700 budget buys for a build it yourself gaming PC:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/build-budget-gaming-pc,4065.html

Current Budget Gaming PC Components
CPU Intel Core i3-4150 (Haswell) $120
CPU Cooler Intel Boxed Heat Sink and Fan $0
Motherboard ASRock H81M-HDS, LGA 1150, Intel H81 Express $57
RAM G.Skill Ripjaws 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3 1600 F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL $64
Graphics Sapphire Dual-X Radeon R9 280 100373L $180
Hard Drive Western Digital WD Blue WD10EZEX 1TB $55
Power EVGA 100-W1-500-KR 500W $43
Performance Platform Cost $519
Storage Drive None $0
Case NZXT Source 210 Elite Black $50
Optical Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK SATA 24x DVD Burner $20
Total Hardware Cost
$589
OS Windows 8.1 X64 OEM $100
Complete System Price
$689

As anyone familiar with PC components will recognize (anyone familiar will already have a good idea of what $700 in hardware will buy anyway) this is a competent but modest 1920x1080 gaming PC.

I suggest reading builder articles from Tomshardware.com to better educate yourself on what various budgets will currently buy and the tested performance numbers said builds will yield.

This is pretty much perfect. Dare I say a rig like that one should last the entire generation, if you don't mind reducing settings. Though I'd replace Windows 8.1 with Windows 7, which can be found for $70 or less if you look around, and just upgrade to Windows 10 when the time comes.

@OP, don't forget the cost of a monitor, unless you plan on playing on your TV. Monitors are generally pretty long lived, in my experience, so it might be worth it to look for a used one.



Trunkin said:
greenmedic88 said:
$500-700 is considered budget level PC gaming.

No one builds a gaming PC with anything approaching a 10 year life expectancy, even for actual top of the line systems that run in excess of several thousand dollars.

This is very realistically what a $700 budget buys for a build it yourself gaming PC:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/build-budget-gaming-pc,4065.html

Current Budget Gaming PC Components
CPU Intel Core i3-4150 (Haswell) $120
CPU Cooler Intel Boxed Heat Sink and Fan $0
Motherboard ASRock H81M-HDS, LGA 1150, Intel H81 Express $57
RAM G.Skill Ripjaws 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3 1600 F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL $64
Graphics Sapphire Dual-X Radeon R9 280 100373L $180
Hard Drive Western Digital WD Blue WD10EZEX 1TB $55
Power EVGA 100-W1-500-KR 500W $43
Performance Platform Cost $519
Storage Drive None $0
Case NZXT Source 210 Elite Black $50
Optical Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK SATA 24x DVD Burner $20
Total Hardware Cost
$589
OS Windows 8.1 X64 OEM $100
Complete System Price
$689

As anyone familiar with PC components will recognize (anyone familiar will already have a good idea of what $700 in hardware will buy anyway) this is a competent but modest 1920x1080 gaming PC.

I suggest reading builder articles from Tomshardware.com to better educate yourself on what various budgets will currently buy and the tested performance numbers said builds will yield.

This is pretty much perfect. Dare I say a rig like that one should last the entire generation, if you don't mind reducing settings. Though I'd replace Windows 8.1 with Windows 7, which can be found for $70 or less if you look around, and just upgrade to Windows 10 when the time comes.

@OP, don't forget the cost of a monitor, unless you plan on playing on your TV. Monitors are generally pretty long lived, in my experience, so it might be worth it to look for a used one.


I wouldn't go with the 280.  You'll get very consistent 30 fps at 1080p for most games, but you won't get to 60 fps.  How pay $700 to get something close to a PS4.  You mind as well just get a PS4 with a bundled game for $399.

I would go at least an AMD 290 4GB (less than $300) or a cheap sub-$300 GTX 970, so you can get close to 60 fps for most games at 1080p.  It'll set you back an extra $100.

 

I actually agree with another poster here.  I would go moderate-high for CPU, motherboard and memory that can last you several years.  And gimp on a weak GPU for now.  In the future, in few years, you can switch out a very good GPU.  




bevochan said:
Trunkin said:

This is pretty much perfect. Dare I say a rig like that one should last the entire generation, if you don't mind reducing settings. Though I'd replace Windows 8.1 with Windows 7, which can be found for $70 or less if you look around, and just upgrade to Windows 10 when the time comes.

@OP, don't forget the cost of a monitor, unless you plan on playing on your TV. Monitors are generally pretty long lived, in my experience, so it might be worth it to look for a used one.


I wouldn't go with the 280.  You'll get very consistent 30 fps at 1080p for most games, but you won't get to 60 fps.  How pay $700 to get something close to a PS4.  You mind as well just get a PS4 with a bundled game for $399.

I would go at least an AMD 290 4GB (less than $300) or a cheap sub-$300 GTX 970, so you can get close to 60 fps for most games at 1080p.  It'll set you back an extra $100.

 

I actually agree with another poster here.  I would go moderate-high for CPU, motherboard and memory that can last you several years.  And gimp on a weak GPU for now.  In the future, in few years, you can switch out a very good GPU.  


But a very good GPU a few years from now won't fit with the older components. He would likely need to replace the motherboard, RAM and PSU and possibly the CPU if the goes for an i3 like some have recommended. That kind of defeats the whole purpose imo.



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fatslob-:O said:
LMU Uncle Alfred said:

Yeah, the issues I have with building a PC have to do with compatibility and balance (one-sided power on either the processing speed or graphics capability).  It's why I don't entirely trust myself to go looking for parts.  There could be hardware or software conflicts and so on and I don't want to spend any money until I'm entirely certain the balance won't be thrown off and everything will work together well as one cohesive unit.

I worry about compatibility like you do to but what you want to start looking at first is the case, motherboard, and power supply ... 

Forget about the CPU or the GPU, just focus on picking out these three parts first ...

For the case, I recommend an "ATX Mid Tower" sized case since it is compatible with large video cards and that's ideal for getting more performance. (Get this part new.)

As for the motherboard, get one that's compatible with an LGA 1150 CPU socket AND it MUST also have a PCI Express 3.0 expansion slot. (Get this part new and just one expansion slot is enough.)

You also want to get a 600+ watt power supply with at least 2 6+2 pin PCIE connectors. (Get this part new.)

I have another question, what will be your display ?


Sorry it's been so late, but had to go to work.  Also I might only be able to do one more post after this; gotta get going somewhere.  My display?  Well something pretty large.  Not 4K resolution, but something decent.  I know that hasn't been taken into account yet, but I'm considering that a separate purchase for now.

 

Edit:  That also goes for mouse and keyboard, sound system and other I/O devices.



Lube Me Up

I'm taking everyone's advice into consideration. Overflow this topic if you have to. Over the weekend I can look everything over more thoroughly. Thank you, and keep em' coming :)



Lube Me Up

LMU Uncle Alfred said:

I never had a powerful gaming PC before; a decent laptop but not a really powerful desktop PC.  I'm wondering if someone could help me out here.

I see a few places that look tempting to buy from, but I want some advice from some local experts. 

NOTE:  There are two schools of thought I'm going for, and aside of power I'm looking for good heat reduction as well:

1. A PC that is around $500 ($530 at most) with the best specs that you think you could find if you were buying it.

An awesome gaming rig around $500 would be my first choice, but..

2. I'm willing to go to $650 or at the VERY HIGHEST $700, but only if it completely blows anything around $500 away;  and I mean significantly.  Not mildly better, I mean top of the line and could last 5-10 years able to play anything at max setting.  I don't know if that's possible, but well here we are.


Hate to break it to you, but what you want isn't possible. My 1200 dollar rig from 3 years ago is now a midrange PC. If you're spending 650 now, it's going to be able to play things on high at 1080p for the next 2 years probably. Spending 650 will get you something a bit stonger than a PS4. Get an fx 8320, a 280, and 8 gigs of ram. Sorry dude, but what you want out of a PC wouldn't even be possible if you spend over 7 grand on a desktop. 



Mummelmann said:

But a very good GPU a few years from now won't fit with the older components. He would likely need to replace the motherboard, RAM and PSU and possibly the CPU if the goes for an i3 like some have recommended. That kind of defeats the whole purpose imo.

A GTX 970 can go into a PCIE 2.0 slot with almost no performance loss.  (PCIE 2.0 is 8 years old.)  If an 8 year old slot isn't holding back a new GPU, there isn't much reason to expect 3.0 slot to hold back a GPU 3 years from now.  

The suggestion is to skimp on the GPU, and go towards a better CPU.  He could get an i5 for example.  The motherboard, RAM would not be likely to need replacing.  The only reason the CPU and PSU would go is if he wasn't planning on using them.  He can get something like a 850W, and that should work great in even 3 years. The CPU like I said, he could get an i5 for example, which is a great CPU.  If he's willing to extend his budget a little, he could even get an i7.  Those CPUs will be good for a while.  Most games are mostly held back by the GPU, with a few exceptions, and don't see much reason for that to change.  Actually I'm expecting that to get worse.  Especially as GPUs get better and more computing is done on there.  

If he plans correctly, a good GPU will fit great with the older components.  If he doesn't plan so well, then I will agree.  



Mummelmann said:

But a very good GPU a few years from now won't fit with the older components.

Uh...how?



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