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Was going after the casual crowd a bad strategy for Nintendo last gen?

Forums - Nintendo Discussion - Was going after the casual crowd a bad strategy for Nintendo last gen?

Going after casuals is not a bad strategy, but they went after non-gamers, who ended up having no interest in a newer console, so didn't buy the next nintendo homeconsole.

Edit : All casuals didn't move mobile. COD and sports games still sell very well.



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Short version: The wii was the BEST decision Nintendo could make, the WiiU was the WORST decision Nintendo could make. Their games are pretty sweet though.



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mZuzek said:
axt113 said:

Not really, they tossed out some vague rhetoric, but it was obvious from their actions they had moved beyond the expanded audience.

First clue was the system itself, especially the gamepad, its big clunky and uneccesary.

Second is the library especially the rehash NSMB Wii U and the shallow Nintendoland, which showed Nintendo was not interested in really reaching out to an expanded audience like they did with the Wii

Just because they did it wrong doesn't mean they weren't trying to.

They knew the casuals had moved to tablets, so the gamepad was an obvious attempt at getting their attention back by having a similar device. Nintendo Land was an attempt at recreating the Wii Sports effect, while NSMBU was only the newest in a franchise that has always sold countless millions to casuals. They were 100% committed to bringing back the casuals for the Wii U, but they failed because the casuals were obviously not willing to pay $300 to play $60 games when they already have a tablet filled with free to play stuff.

No, they moved to tablets because Miyamoto has long wanted to seperate the system from the TV, he had talked about that idea for years.

 

Wrong, it had nothing to do with paying for $60 games or paying $300, if the games had been compelling, and on good hardware, people would have wanted it.

But the gamepad is not a good device for games, nor is Nintendoland anything like Wii sports, its a bunch of nintento themed mini-games, not a sports based game with no real nintendo theme.

Sports games have much more appeal than minigames and the Nintendo theme was not what the expanded audience wanted.

As for NSMB WiiU, it was a rehash of NSMB Wii which itself was not anything new or special (NSMB wii succeeded because people had been hungry for a 2D mario, after that hunger was somewhat satiated, Nintendo had to be innovative with the next one they failed), where was the interesting worlds to explore, the wide assortment of playable characters and the great music.

It wasn't there, it was clear that Nintendo wasn't interested in reaching the expanded audience, and the words for people such as Miyamoto have confirmed this.  They want to make what they want to make, not what the expanded audience wants.



RenCutypoison said:

Going after casuals is not a bad strategy, but they went after non-gamers, who ended up having no interest in a newer console, so didn't buy the next nintendo homeconsole.

Edit : All casuals didn't move mobile. COD and sports games still sell very well.

Sports game players aren't casuals. I buy many games every year at full price ($70), more than most of you, but I also buy FIFA every 2 years.



I think the mistake was the Wii U.

They should have embraced what they had achieved. Release a console in 2010-11, call it Wii Too and add improved motion controls, perhaps with a camera. It wouldn't have sold as well as the Wii, but I'm pretty sure it would have sold much, much better than Wii U.



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Yes, they just went after a market that abandoned them for mobile phones. Now the hardcore gaming market simply doesn't even sees them as competitors.



RenCutypoison said:

Edit : All casuals didn't move mobile. COD and sports games still sell very well.


These aren't necessarily casual games. I play Killzone Shadow Fan with a clan and most guys there play Battlefield, CoD, Destiny and so on, since the first iteration and are pretty good at shooters. The same can be said about sports games. Just because they play mainly a genre, they aren't casuals. A high class competitve DOTA player is a casual because he mainly play MOBAs? A EVO world champion is a casual because he basically plays KOF, SF and Tekken?



Yup. You can pretty much say Nintendo made a bad call.



"Say what you want about Americans but we understand Capitalism.You buy yourself a product and you Get What You Pay For."  

- Max Payne 3

Yes.



axt113 said:
mZuzek said:
axt113 said:

Not really, they tossed out some vague rhetoric, but it was obvious from their actions they had moved beyond the expanded audience.

First clue was the system itself, especially the gamepad, its big clunky and uneccesary.

Second is the library especially the rehash NSMB Wii U and the shallow Nintendoland, which showed Nintendo was not interested in really reaching out to an expanded audience like they did with the Wii

Just because they did it wrong doesn't mean they weren't trying to.

They knew the casuals had moved to tablets, so the gamepad was an obvious attempt at getting their attention back by having a similar device. Nintendo Land was an attempt at recreating the Wii Sports effect, while NSMBU was only the newest in a franchise that has always sold countless millions to casuals. They were 100% committed to bringing back the casuals for the Wii U, but they failed because the casuals were obviously not willing to pay $300 to play $60 games when they already have a tablet filled with free to play stuff.

No, they moved to tablets because Miyamoto has long wanted to seperate the system from the TV, he had talked about that idea for years.

 

Wrong, it had nothing to do with paying for $60 games or paying $300, if the games had been compelling, and on good hardware, people would have wanted it.

But the gamepad is not a good device for games, nor is Nintendoland anything like Wii sports, its a bunch of nintento themed mini-games, not a sports based game with no real nintendo theme.

Sports games have much more appeal than minigames and the Nintendo theme was not what the expanded audience wanted.

As for NSMB WiiU, it was a rehash of NSMB Wii which itself was not anything new or special (NSMB wii succeeded because people had been hungry for a 2D mario, after that hunger was somewhat satiated, Nintendo had to be innovative with the next one they failed), where was the interesting worlds to explore, the wide assortment of playable characters and the great music.

It wasn't there, it was clear that Nintendo wasn't interested in reaching the expanded audience, and the words for people such as Miyamoto have confirmed this.  They want to make what they want to make, not what the expanded audience wants.


The "expanded audience" is quite happy with sh*t like Candy Crush for free. Nintendo did have Wii Sports, Wii Fit, and Wii Party U available within the first 12 months, none of those are Nintendo mascot themed. 

Nintendo can't compete against Apple/Google for casuals, why pay $60 for one game, when you can get 50 games on your phone for that? Especially when 4-5 games keep casuals happy as is?

Casuals aren't like hardcore players, they don't need a new game every month, actually they are quite happy with just 4-5 "fun" games that they are "good" at and can burn 15-20 minutes away with. That's all they want. 

Nintendo trying to sell them a $300 console + $60 games to fill their gaming niche when their smartphone that's with them 24/7 does it just as well is Nintendo's problem. There's no market for a casual game console anymore because there's no need for one. Just like no one but your grandparents carry a point and click camera anymore ... there's no need for those when a smartphone takes good pictures. If you need more than that, then people go for the high end DSLR for vacation photos.