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What Makes Game Stories Unique? *Video*

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Rev3Games talks with Josef Fares (Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons) and Gary Whitta (The Walking Dead, Episode 4), two filmmakers that's work on awardwinning games, about the difference between stories in games and movies and what kind of stories only games can tell.

 

I think this was a great video! In the future we'll be seeing less and less of lenghty cut scenes, a la Metal Gear and Uncharted - and that's for the better!



I'm on Twitter @DanneSandin!

Furthermore, I think VGChartz should add a "Like"-button.

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DanneSandin said:

Rev3Games talks with Josef Fares (Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons) and Gary Whitta (The Walking Dead, Episode 4), two filmmakers that's work on awardwinning games, about the difference between stories in games and movies and what kind of stories only games can tell.

 

I think this was a great video! In the future we'll be seeing less and less of lenghty cut scenes, a la Metal Gear and Uncharted - and that's for the better!


I have no time to watch the video, (So maybe I'm screwing this one because they explained it in there) but @bolded Uncharted's cutscenes weren't even lenghty, and what's the problem with Metal Gear cutscenes? What about us who like those types of storytelling?



Wright said:
DanneSandin said:

Rev3Games talks with Josef Fares (Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons) and Gary Whitta (The Walking Dead, Episode 4), two filmmakers that's work on awardwinning games, about the difference between stories in games and movies and what kind of stories only games can tell.

 

I think this was a great video! In the future we'll be seeing less and less of lenghty cut scenes, a la Metal Gear and Uncharted - and that's for the better!


I have no time to watch the video, (So maybe I'm screwing this one because they explained it in there) but @bolded Uncharted's cutscenes weren't even lenghty, and what's the problem with Metal Gear cutscenes? What about us who like those types of storytelling?

There's nothing wrong with them per say, but they're not using gaming as a media to tell their stories; they're more aching to movies than games when telling the stories. I feel like games are coming into their own as a story telling media now; they're simply not just copy and pasting what the movies have down before. They're starting to move away from the Hollywoodesque ways of making things and starting to find their own way. And that can only be a good thing. I don't think that long cut scenes will disappear, but we'll start to see less and less of them in favor of a way of telling a story that is unique to gaming.



I'm on Twitter @DanneSandin!

Furthermore, I think VGChartz should add a "Like"-button.

Indies have been using interactive, integrated storytelling for a long time now (ever play Cave Story? One of the best, integrated stories in games I have ever seen). This isn't some new thing. If you think anything is going to change in the mainstream then I believe you are wrong. It is far easier to tell a story through cutscenes than through gameplay and it is easier to understand for the casual player also.



yeah thats why brothers is my top rated game with walking dead not far behind



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Wright said:
DanneSandin said:

Rev3Games talks with Josef Fares (Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons) and Gary Whitta (The Walking Dead, Episode 4), two filmmakers that's work on awardwinning games, about the difference between stories in games and movies and what kind of stories only games can tell.

 

I think this was a great video! In the future we'll be seeing less and less of lenghty cut scenes, a la Metal Gear and Uncharted - and that's for the better!


I have no time to watch the video, (So maybe I'm screwing this one because they explained it in there) but @bolded Uncharted's cutscenes weren't even lenghty, and what's the problem with Metal Gear cutscenes? What about us who like those types of storytelling?


I guess if you like watching long-drawn-out cutscenes or games with an excessive amount of them you'd be better off watching a film or tv show.

The point of videogames is that it's an interactive medium, the more developers who try to tell a story through gameplay the better.



sundin13 said:

Indies have been using interactive, integrated storytelling for a long time now (ever play Cave Story? One of the best, integrated stories in games I have ever seen). This isn't some new thing. If you think anything is going to change in the mainstream then I believe you are wrong. It is far easier to tell a story through cutscenes than through gameplay and it is easier to understand for the casual player also.

I think we've already started to see the change. Brothers have been well received, as was Walking Dead - and neither game is as relient on cut scenes as many other games. Give it time. I think we'll see more and more interactive story telling. Nowadays, these things starts small and grow big: the AAA doesn't innovate as much anymore, but indies have taken on that role, with the big block busters following suit later on and implementing some of the new ideas.



I'm on Twitter @DanneSandin!

Furthermore, I think VGChartz should add a "Like"-button.

JustThatGamer said:


I guess if you like watching long-drawn-out cutscenes or games with an excessive amount of them you'd be better off watching a film or tv show.

The point of videogames is that it's an interactive medium, the more developers who try to tell a story through gameplay the better.

QFT!



I'm on Twitter @DanneSandin!

Furthermore, I think VGChartz should add a "Like"-button.

DanneSandin said:
sundin13 said:

Indies have been using interactive, integrated storytelling for a long time now (ever play Cave Story? One of the best, integrated stories in games I have ever seen). This isn't some new thing. If you think anything is going to change in the mainstream then I believe you are wrong. It is far easier to tell a story through cutscenes than through gameplay and it is easier to understand for the casual player also.

I think we've already started to see the change. Brothers have been well received, as was Walking Dead - and neither game is as relient on cut scenes as many other games. Give it time. I think we'll see more and more interactive story telling. Nowadays, these things starts small and grow big: the AAA doesn't innovate as much anymore, but indies have taken on that role, with the big block busters following suit later on and implementing some of the new ideas.

Like I said, this isn't a new idea, indies have been doing it for a while. Yes, indies will continue to innovate and bring great stories to gaming but I don't think it will reach into mainstream gaming any time soon...there may be a game every now and again that uses integrated story telling but you wont see it become the standard this gen (thats my prediction at least).

You could just as easily argue that games are moving away from story and into set pieces and gameplay by pointing towards Titanfall (which has next to no story) and Infamous (which has a story but its fairly typical and more of a means of progressing the gameplay than anything), two of the biggest releases of the year



sundin13 said:
DanneSandin said:

I think we've already started to see the change. Brothers have been well received, as was Walking Dead - and neither game is as relient on cut scenes as many other games. Give it time. I think we'll see more and more interactive story telling. Nowadays, these things starts small and grow big: the AAA doesn't innovate as much anymore, but indies have taken on that role, with the big block busters following suit later on and implementing some of the new ideas.

Like I said, this isn't a new idea, indies have been doing it for a while. Yes, indies will continue to innovate and bring great stories to gaming but I don't think it will reach into mainstream gaming any time soon...there may be a game every now and again that uses integrated story telling but you wont see it become the standard this gen (thats my prediction at least).

You could just as easily argue that games are moving away from story and into set pieces and gameplay by pointing towards Titanfall (which has next to no story) and Infamous (which has a story but its fairly typical and more of a means of progressing the gameplay than anything), two of the biggest releases of the year

I think there always will be games that has next to no story at all. Heck, I wouldn't want a story in all my games. Mario with a deep story? No thanks. But games that are more story driven would really benefit from embracing the interactivity that is present in games. It probably will be a slow process, but like they said in the video: the first movies were more of a filmed theatre than what we call a movie today.

It wasn't sooo long ago when games told their stories in the manual that came with the actual game. Cut scenes weren't common at all in the 80's but gradually became the norm, and that'll probably also shift as time passes by.



I'm on Twitter @DanneSandin!

Furthermore, I think VGChartz should add a "Like"-button.