Forums - PC Discussion - Going to build my first ever PC - Suggestions and input welcome

Hi all

I PC game on and off, but I have never built my own PC.  In Australia, all parts are more expensive, but purchasing a pre-built system is particularly prohibitive.

I am looking to spend approximately $8-900 Australian on the parts.  This link represents a pretty well known and cheap Aussie supplier, but I am perfectly open to suggestions.

I am certainly checking out Youtube videos on things you need to know about building your own PC, but I would certainly welcome input on:

 

  • The best parts to fit together in that budget;
  • General suggestions around building your own PC, the sorts of things someone new might not be aware of (construction space, compatibility issues, extra cords I might need, ideal space and power supple - I know NOTHING about motherboards etc); and
  • Any suggestions for where else in Australian I might purchase parts.
My current monitor is 1080p - I don't envision going much higher than that, but if the budget would allow enough power to run a theoretically higher resolution monitor, who knows, I might get one one day!

All input welcome and greatly appreciated.  My goal is to build a computer to use and enjoy, but half of the experience is doing it myself and proving that I can!

 



starcraft - Playing Games = FUN, Talking about Games = SERIOUS

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It's pretty easy these days, as long as you do a little research first and can read instructions you shouldn't have any issues. A decent sized table/bench and a screwdriver should have you covered. Almost all consumer components will come with that cables etc that you need. It's all pretty standardized these days.

Always shop around and when ordering online always check to see what they charge for shipping. IDK about Australia but over in New Zealand there is a site called Pricespy that tracks the prices for products across all the online retailers. It's a very useful tool maybe there is a local alternative.

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zarx said:
It's pretty easy these days, as long as you do a little research first and can read instructions you shouldn't have any issues. A decent sized table/bench and a screwdriver should have you covered. Almost all consumer components will come with that cables etc that you need. It's all pretty standardized these days.

Always shop around and when ordering online always check to see what they charge for shipping. IDK about Australia but over in New Zealand there is a site called Pricespy that tracks the prices for products across all the online retailers. It's a very useful tool maybe there is a local alternative.

Thank you, I imagine that would be something like Getprice!

Do I not need thinks like heat-absorbing adhesive and things, or will it come with the components?



starcraft - Playing Games = FUN, Talking about Games = SERIOUS

Go big on RAM

pcpartpicker.com

This site should help you a lot to build ur PC so check it out!

And set your country at the top right to make the prices revelvent to your country



       

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All retail Aftermarket Heatsink/Fans I've purchase have come with thermal compound, but to be sure: Artic Silver MX is something you could also get.
Try to go for Intel for the CPU, as their CPUs always have better IPC (Intructions Per Cycle) than AMD.
An i5 Haswell would be a good choice.
I would also go for Nvidia for the Video card especially at the moment where the AMD cards are having a bitcoin bubble over-inflating the price on their cards.
Some good links:
http://www.videocardbenchmark.net/high_end_gpus.html
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/high_end_cpus.html
(You might have an Australian website for these same domains)

rmarier83 said:
All retail Aftermarket Heatsink/Fans I've purchase have come with thermal compound, but to be sure: Artic Silver MX is something you could also get.
Try to go for Intel for the CPU, as their CPUs always have better IPC (Intructions Per Cycle) than AMD.
An i5 Haswell would be a good choice.
I would also go for Nvidia for the Video card especially at the moment where the AMD cards are having a bitcoin bubble over-inflating the price on their cards.
Some good links:
http://www.videocardbenchmark.net/high_end_gpus.html
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/high_end_cpus.html
(You might have an Australian website for these same domains)

Ah thanks brilliant.

That Part Picker site looks great as well Jizz Beard.

Anyone got suggestions for entire builds?  And motherboards?

So tough figuring out what to match up!



starcraft - Playing Games = FUN, Talking about Games = SERIOUS

AMD or Nvidia?

starcraft said:
zarx said:
It's pretty easy these days, as long as you do a little research first and can read instructions you shouldn't have any issues. A decent sized table/bench and a screwdriver should have you covered. Almost all consumer components will come with that cables etc that you need. It's all pretty standardized these days.

Always shop around and when ordering online always check to see what they charge for shipping. IDK about Australia but over in New Zealand there is a site called Pricespy that tracks the prices for products across all the online retailers. It's a very useful tool maybe there is a local alternative.

Thank you, I imagine that would be something like Getprice!

Do I not need thinks like heat-absorbing adhesive and things, or will it come with the components?

You mean thermal paste? If you're using the included CPU cooler, you're pretty much covered. The paste comes pre-installed, so all you have to do is snap your cooler to the mobo - be warned, excessive force may be required. *cringe* If you're buying an i5 and don't plan on overclocking, I think the stock cooler should serve you just fine. Been working great for me. Aftermarket coolers usually come with tiny containers of thermal paste, but you wil have to apply it yourself.

I'd recommend that you don't skimp out on your case or PSU, as those are two components you will most likely not be upgrading for a good long time. It's best to buy a PSU that has considerable breathing room above and beyond the build you're currently planning, if you can afford to...I really couldn't... 

Newegg's 3 part computer building video series was an excellent source of information for me. Definitely watch part 2, at the very least.

Tomshardware is a good place to go if you're looking for benchmarks on CPUs and GPUs. Actually, you should definitely check out their Best Gaming CPU's for the money and Best GPUs For the Money articles. The prices are in USD, but that's nothing a little excel magic won't fix. :) The CPU/GPU hierarchy charts included are invaluable as well.



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A few quick recommendations

1. Get an Intel CPU, don't go AMD if you can help it.
2. If your overclocking get an H80i or H100i
3. For RAM get no less than 8 GB, I personally recommend either Corsair Vengance or Crucial Ballistix Elite
4. Get no less than 700w on your power supply IMO if you can afford it even if your current build won't use that much. Its always nice to have extra if you upgrade to stronger cards in the future.