Forums - Nintendo Discussion - Do you want Koji Kondo to come back for Zelda U ?

Will Koji Kondo come back to compose the Zelda U OST ?

Sure not !
Not sure...
I hope so, in solo
Yes, with many others

The composer Koji Kondo was the only composer for most of Nintendo Mario and Zelda games from 1985 to 1997. Thereafter, he was joined by Tori Minegishi for Majoras's Mask, and Hajime Wakai, Kenta Nagata, and Asuka Ohta for the nex game. Now, he doesn't play a great role in the composition, as he says he only composed one track for Skyward Sword, althought he was very present in Twilight Princess.

His style is very specific, and his music is delicious. He's very talented because he really changes his style according to the ambiance of the game. That's logical, you'll say, but he really makes it good. For the Mario Series, his music is very cool and funny (Super Mario 64 main theme, Super Mario Bros series...) although in Zelda games, there is sometiimes a touch of sadness, melancoly which really makes a tribute to the games (Kakariko village, Zelda Lullaby and many others) and we can feel a deepness in the themes of the dungeons for rxample (ALTTP dungeons, oot Spirit Temple dungeon...)

So here is my question, do you want/ think that Koji Kondo will come back to compose Zelda U soundtrack in solo, with others, or do you think that he won' return ?



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To be honest, the only way we will get great sounding tracks like in the 16 bit and 32 bit era is if the composers draw back on the number of channels they have.
Unlike graphics, music seems to get worse the more technology advances. Somehow they dont seem to get that too many sounds just get filtered as noise to our brains instead of melodies.
Most JRPG's have crappy soundtracks where they used to great in the past. The only exception is Nier.

Nem said:
To be honest, the only way we will get great sounding tracks like in the 16 bit and 32 bit era is if the composers draw back on the number of channels they have.
Unlike graphics, music seems to get worse the more technology advances. Somehow they dont seem to get that too many sounds just get filtered as noise to our brains instead of melodies.
Most JRPG's have crappy soundtracks where they used to great in the past. The only exception is Nier.

What are you on about. Modern soundtracks are amazing and epic. They simply arent as memorable and catchy because our brain isnt good at remebering so many diverse noises. That dosent mean the quality is gone.



ktay95 said:
Nem said:
To be honest, the only way we will get great sounding tracks like in the 16 bit and 32 bit era is if the composers draw back on the number of channels they have.
Unlike graphics, music seems to get worse the more technology advances. Somehow they dont seem to get that too many sounds just get filtered as noise to our brains instead of melodies.
Most JRPG's have crappy soundtracks where they used to great in the past. The only exception is Nier.

What are you on about. Modern soundtracks are amazing and epic. They simply arent as memorable and catchy because our brain isnt good at remebering so many diverse noises. That dosent mean the quality is gone.


If its being filtered as trash and not beeing remembered i question your assumption. What is good music? The one our brain enjoys and memorises or the one we forget cause its filtered by the brain as noise?



Nem said:


If its being filtered as trash and not beeing remembered i question your assumption. What is good music? The one our brain enjoys and memorises or the one we forget cause its filtered by the brain as noise?

As someone who can pick music apart, I hope soundtracks only get busier. Honestly, I find the older 8-&-16-bit stuff a bit boring sometimes. Very, very simple, musically speaking.

Sure, they're memorable, but so is Dr. Seuss. Green Eggs & Ham isn't better than Tom Sawyer just because you can memorize it more easily.



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the_dengle said:
Nem said:


If its being filtered as trash and not beeing remembered i question your assumption. What is good music? The one our brain enjoys and memorises or the one we forget cause its filtered by the brain as noise?

As someone who can pick music apart, I hope soundtracks only get busier. Honestly, I find the older 8-&-16-bit stuff a bit boring sometimes. Very, very simple, musically speaking.

Sure, they're memorable, but so is Dr. Seuss. Green Eggs & Ham isn't better than Tom Sawyer just because you can memorize it more easily.


I didnt say anything about 8 bit. I said 16-32. 32 beeing the highlight to me. Nothing that came after was in general as good as what we had in the Playstation one era. Rare exceptions of course.

I still question though. If its filtered as noise, how can it be good music? You say you can hear portions, i suppose cause you have some music background? Portions arent the same thing as the full music.



Nem said:
the_dengle said:
Nem said:


If its being filtered as trash and not beeing remembered i question your assumption. What is good music? The one our brain enjoys and memorises or the one we forget cause its filtered by the brain as noise?

As someone who can pick music apart, I hope soundtracks only get busier. Honestly, I find the older 8-&-16-bit stuff a bit boring sometimes. Very, very simple, musically speaking.

Sure, they're memorable, but so is Dr. Seuss. Green Eggs & Ham isn't better than Tom Sawyer just because you can memorize it more easily.


I didnt say anything about 8 bit. I said 16-32. 32 beeing the highlight to me. Nothing that came after was in general as good as what we had in the Playstation one era. Rare exceptions of course.

I'd actually take 8 over 16. 8-bit is at least interesting when considering the limitations imposed by the hardware at the time. I get a kick out of listening to the faster-paced tracks that manage to make it sound busier than it actually is.

16-bit is okay, but it's the beginning of video game music trying to emulate the sounds of real instruments. Because it sounds so... sort of muffled, it's not really a big issue. But, for instance, the Link to the Past overworld theme has always rubbed me the wrong way because of the fake trumpet sounds. I just don't get it. For games like F-Zero or Sonic the Hedgehog though, where the electronic sound really fits, I like it.

32-bit is pretty much my least-favorite era of music. It's the problem I had with the 16-bit era taken to the next level. Sure, when I was 10 or whatever I didn't even know the difference, but I'm quite a bit older than that now and most video game music from N64/PS1 makes me grind my teeth. The compositions seem generally better than previous generations, though, in part because they had more tools to work with.

I haven't noticed any significant decline in the quality of video game music compositions since then. And now composers have even more tools to work with than they did before -- including, finally, real musicians. Game music can be way more dynamic now. Hopefully composers start to really take advantage of all of the new tools available to them.

In response to the OP, no, I don't want Koji Kondo back in Zelda. Not in a big role; he can write a couple of songs. His style is great for the Mario series, as the "big band" sound really seems to click with him. But his Zelda compositions are too simple. He was great at writing tracks being "played" by 10 or fewer virtual instruments with no dynamics. Zelda needs a modern composer who can bring the range of a full live orchestra to the music.



Nem said:
ktay95 said:
Nem said:
To be honest, the only way we will get great sounding tracks like in the 16 bit and 32 bit era is if the composers draw back on the number of channels they have.
Unlike graphics, music seems to get worse the more technology advances. Somehow they dont seem to get that too many sounds just get filtered as noise to our brains instead of melodies.
Most JRPG's have crappy soundtracks where they used to great in the past. The only exception is Nier.

What are you on about. Modern soundtracks are amazing and epic. They simply arent as memorable and catchy because our brain isnt good at remebering so many diverse noises. That dosent mean the quality is gone.


If its being filtered as trash and not beeing remembered i question your assumption. What is good music? The one our brain enjoys and memorises or the one we forget cause its filtered by the brain as noise?

Memorises ≠ Good

I can forget a song I enjoy over time

My brain however memorises shit like Friday by Rebbeca Black.

Good music is good music weather it has a cathy memorable beat or not.



Yes, he should return !
He seems to be heavily involved in Mario 3D World, so he might want to "step down" to composing instead of supervising on the next Zelda game too.
For how much I loved Skyward Sword...the music was a bit on the weaker side...not bad by any stretch...but not on the same level as the other games :/

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ktay95 said:
 

Memorises ≠ Good

I can forget a song I enjoy over time

My brain however memorises shit like Friday by Rebbeca Black.

Good music is good music weather it has a cathy memorable beat or not.


Regardless of memorisation, if the sounds are too many for your brain to have that capicity (doesnt mean you actually do), the sound is filtered as noise. I dont understand how that can be good music. It might be, but not for humans. The only way for you to properly enjoy it is to focus on some of the portions.

I can make a music with 30 tracks of sounds. No matter how good it is, its nothing but noise for the brain. So, how come this would be considered good music. I think that is exactly the problem with music these days. Its all noise. Noise is not good music. Our brains have limitations, even if technology doesnt have the same ones.

Creativity and different sounds are the way to make good music. Not pooling 10 more sounds on top of the other ones.

This is also why people get excited about music composers like this zelda guy, the megaman 2 composer, Nobuo Uematsu. While nowadays there is no such renowned composers because they all seem to fall on that pit. More is not always better.