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God doesn't prevent terrible things because?

Forums - General Discussion - God doesn't prevent terrible things because?

Please choose wisely....

A. He can't 24 6.96%
 
B. He doesn't want to 86 24.93%
 
C. He causes them 22 6.38%
 
D. He doesn't exist. 213 61.74%
 
Total:345

I wonder what life would be like if nothing bad ever happened. Take theological arguments out of it and treat it as a simple hypothetical: would life be better if bad things never happened?

There is no sense of "good" without "bad." You can't be thankful for that which you take for granted.

Would anyone "live life to the fullest" if life were all pleasant, and nothing unexpected ever happened? Would we be able to cherish each moment if we knew, without a doubt, that there would be many more to come?

This topic question has made me wonder: are we only able to truly enjoy life because terrible things do happen? Would we be able to appreciate what we have if nothing could take it away?

Every time something bad happens, we learn from it. We become one step closer to solving a problem, and we make the world a better place. The ability, the need, to ask questions and seek answers is an important part of being human. The world today is a far better place than it was a thousand years ago. But our progress, our triumphs...what would be without them? Empty shells, shuffling around one day to the next, no sense of purpose or direction, nor need for such notions....much like animals, living off instinct, doing only what we must, nothing more, nothing less. What's the point of life if our safety , our well-being, our necessities are all taken care of, and nothing bad can happen? What would we do then? Where would we find our purpose? I don't think the concept of "love" would even exist in such a world.



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Fayceless said:

I wonder what life would be like if nothing bad ever happened. Take theological arguments out of it and treat it as a simple hypothetical: would life be better if bad things never happened?

There is no sense of "good" without "bad." You can't be thankful for that which you take for granted.

Would anyone "live life to the fullest" if life were all pleasant, and nothing unexpected ever happened? Would we be able to cherish each moment if we knew, without a doubt, that there would be many more to come?

This topic question has made me wonder: are we only able to truly enjoy life because terrible things do happen? Would we be able to appreciate what we have if nothing could take it away?

Every time something bad happens, we learn from it. We become one step closer to solving a problem, and we make the world a better place. The ability, the need, to ask questions and seek answers is an important part of being human. The world today is a far better place than it was a thousand years ago. But our progress, our triumphs...what would be without them? Empty shells, shuffling around one day to the next, no sense of purpose or direction, nor need for such notions....much like animals, living off instinct, doing only what we must, nothing more, nothing less. What's the point of life if our safety , our well-being, our necessities are all taken care of, and nothing bad can happen? What would we do then? Where would we find our purpose? I don't think the concept of "love" would even exist in such a world.


Which is why heaven sounds very unpleasant to me.



IIIIITHE1IIIII said:
Fayceless said:

I wonder what life would be like if nothing bad ever happened. Take theological arguments out of it and treat it as a simple hypothetical: would life be better if bad things never happened?

There is no sense of "good" without "bad." You can't be thankful for that which you take for granted.

Would anyone "live life to the fullest" if life were all pleasant, and nothing unexpected ever happened? Would we be able to cherish each moment if we knew, without a doubt, that there would be many more to come?

This topic question has made me wonder: are we only able to truly enjoy life because terrible things do happen? Would we be able to appreciate what we have if nothing could take it away?

Every time something bad happens, we learn from it. We become one step closer to solving a problem, and we make the world a better place. The ability, the need, to ask questions and seek answers is an important part of being human. The world today is a far better place than it was a thousand years ago. But our progress, our triumphs...what would be without them? Empty shells, shuffling around one day to the next, no sense of purpose or direction, nor need for such notions....much like animals, living off instinct, doing only what we must, nothing more, nothing less. What's the point of life if our safety , our well-being, our necessities are all taken care of, and nothing bad can happen? What would we do then? Where would we find our purpose? I don't think the concept of "love" would even exist in such a world.


Which is why heaven sounds very unpleasant to me.


Heh, you know what's funny?  I'm a Christian and I agree with you.  I just assume that nobody really has a clue as to what heaven is.  If it's truly a perfect place, then it is likely beyond the limits of our minds.  But the afterlife has nothing to do with why I choose to believe what I do, what a waste that would be.



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E. He will once there is enough irrefutable evidence that man cannot rule himself.

This goes all the way back to the original sin, which wasn't sex, he told them to fill the earth with their offspring so how could the original sin be sex. The core of the original sin was the challenge that God had no right to rule, or specify what was right or wrong for the humans. Of course he could of just done away with the traitors on the spot but didn't because it would leave the accusation open. So enough time had to be set aside so humans and the being that became Satan (which isn't a name but a title meaning resister) could try as many forms of rulership. But at the same time he instituted the first prophecy on how he was going to redeem mankind.

The book of Job covers a similar accusation, and insight on why God allows that Satan brought up that Job only worship god because god protected him. God allowed Satan to cause all sorts of calamities to befall him. And once Job demonstrated that he wouldn't falter in his faith, he not only restored everything he lost but gave him seven times more.

So God has promised to do similar to mankind. Not only will he restore the earth and resurrect the faithful. He also promised to resurrect those who didn't have a chance to prove themselves faithful because of time and circumstances. (Acts refers to this as the resurrection of judgement.)

The question is actually a rather deep question, its at the core of everything the bible teaches, that has more meat to it than that and I could spend a lot more time on the subject. But that answer should suffice.



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I said option D before i even read the options lol



Nobody's perfect. I aint nobody!!!

Killzone 2. its not a fps. it a FIRST PERSON WAR SIMULATOR!!!! ..The true PLAYSTATION 3 launch date and market dominations is SEP 1st

I'll go with B. I believe in God as a foundational principle but not much else.



Fayceless said:

I wonder what life would be like if nothing bad ever happened. Take theological arguments out of it and treat it as a simple hypothetical: would life be better if bad things never happened?

There is no sense of "good" without "bad." You can't be thankful for that which you take for granted.

Would anyone "live life to the fullest" if life were all pleasant, and nothing unexpected ever happened? Would we be able to cherish each moment if we knew, without a doubt, that there would be many more to come?

This topic question has made me wonder: are we only able to truly enjoy life because terrible things do happen? Would we be able to appreciate what we have if nothing could take it away?

Every time something bad happens, we learn from it. We become one step closer to solving a problem, and we make the world a better place. The ability, the need, to ask questions and seek answers is an important part of being human. The world today is a far better place than it was a thousand years ago. But our progress, our triumphs...what would be without them? Empty shells, shuffling around one day to the next, no sense of purpose or direction, nor need for such notions....much like animals, living off instinct, doing only what we must, nothing more, nothing less. What's the point of life if our safety , our well-being, our necessities are all taken care of, and nothing bad can happen? What would we do then? Where would we find our purpose? I don't think the concept of "love" would even exist in such a world.

I think that is probably the best justification for the existence of evil, albeit not a very convincing one for those who have to go through the suffering. The truth is, I really do think we would value life a lot less if there was no such thing as pain or suffering, whether it resulted from such things as human action or natural disasters/diseases/etc.



blublibla said:
None of the smart people, including Einstein, Doystoevky, Steve Jobs, Da Vinci, Newton etc...are atheist.

None of the people I actually know in freemasonry, government, high cultural/media/political position is an atheist.

Why? Because you really must be a dumb, ignorant and boring fùck to be an atheist.

WHICH do not mean that I am religious...I'm spiritual, I do believe in God, and in my own sense, he simply doesn't do, act or prevent good or evil...it just is.

In Einstein's day atheism meant strong atheism, which is a belief and nearly as bad as religion. 

Today, atheism is the position of the skeptic that there exists no sufficient evidence for god. To put it simply, Einstein was an atheist of today...as are 93% of the NAS (National Academy of Sciences) scientists and 97% of the Royal Society...but yeah no smart atheists...just the most esteemed scientists on the planet inclusive of nobel laureates and winners.

Not sure if you're just trolling or incredibly ignorant? There are a multitude of studies which assert that the intelligentsia is entirely comprised of non-believers. Just to get your started as apparently you have a long journey ahead of you:

"Research found those with higher IQs more likely to dismiss religion"

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2395972/Atheists-higher-IQs-Their-intelligence-makes-likely-dismiss-religion-irrational-unscientific.html

"That's the provocative conclusion of a new review of 63 studies of intelligence and religion that span the past century. The meta-analysis showed that in 53 of the studies, conducted between 1928 to 2012, there was an inverse relation between religiosity -- having religious beliefs, or performing religious rituals -- and intelligence. That is, on average, non-believers scored higher than religious people on intelligence tests."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/14/religious-people-less-intelligent-atheists_n_3750096.html

Next time do some actual research before you make a fool of yourself, will you?



None of the above, but B is closest.

Freewill, we cause bad things for ourselves, not God. Also, how do you know something bad doesn't happen to prevent something even worse?

Maybe someone got hit by a bus (bad thing) on his way to go rob a liquor store where he would have killed the cashier and maybe a couple bystanders (worse thing). Or a harsher example, maybe a child dies of leukemia (awful thing) but the kid was going to grow up to be a serial killer or pedophile?


By the way, the "why does God let bad things happen?" question is the lamest thing non-religious people have come up with thus far.