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Xbox One family sharing works with friends!

Forums - Microsoft Discussion - Xbox One family sharing works with friends!

thx1139 said:
Adinnieken said:
thx1139 said:
I think one of the nuances will be the definition of a family. Not who is in the family, but I would expect only 1 person can be the head of the family and add people to that. I create a family, add my kids, sister, brothers, close personal friends, etc. I don't think then my kids can add people to their family.

I think everyone will be able to setup their own "family".

But just because I give you access to my game, doesn't mean by extension, I've given someone you've defined as a family member access to my game.

It isn't a daisy chain.

Parental controls may permit the parent to limit who can create or access a family, so maybe you don't let your youngest setup a family, but your eldest can.  As it exists with the friends list.  Parents can define whether or not child account can add friends. 

If that is the case then it is an even better feature.  I would be thrilled to have it the way I defined it and ecstatic the way you described it.

Well, there is no family plan.  So, there is no "master" account to a console.  So everything you setup or own, you take with you.  I think they chose "Family" instead of "Clan", which had been appearing in several patents.

I kind of like Clan since it's more Scottish, but Family works too.  A member of a clan can be anyone, but most definitely a family member including extended family, a member of your family is a member of your family.





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Will you need to download the game or will you play it directly from the cloud? Also why the hell aren't they pushing this feature hard I bet a bunch of people would forget all the other stuff if this end up being true, I doubt it is because it seems counter productive but if it's true this would repaira lot of the damage done lately to the brand



Bet reminder: I bet with Tboned51 that Splatoon won't reach the 1 million shipped mark by the end of 2015. I win if he loses and I lose if I lost.

Adinnieken said:
LurkerJ said:
They should come out again and explain everything down to the tiniest detail. This is useless. You really think they will allow 10 people to play the single player campaign this easy? They won't, for the simple fact that this defeats the whole purpose of implementing DRM and a daily internet authentication.

How does it defeat the purpose of DRM?

The purpose of DRM is to assure that the person who paid for that digital copy of the content is in control and posession of that digital copy of the content.

Unlike the physical media, where only one person can be in possession of the disc at one time, in digital content an exact duplicate can be made an distributed without any changes to or from the original version.  Thus, sharing becomes giving.  The solution to that is to restrict where digital content will run with DRM.  DRM ensures the copyright holder that the person in possession of the content is the person to whom it was licensed.

The Xbox 360 allowed for any player connected to the console to be able to play any downloaded content that was downloaded after the account was added.  It wasn't really a feature, because it wasn't intended.  It was simply a limitation of the console.  With the Xbox One, Microsoft is not only making that a feature, so that all content on the system is available to who ever is logged into the console, but also any content can be shared with up to 10 people.  The PS3 had a similar feature but it was restricted to content being available on up to 5 devices.  The Xbox One doesn't limit by device. 

I can go anywhere, to any console, log in and I have access to my games.  I can install and I can play them, and so can anyone else on that console.  Likewise, anyone who I've designated a "family" member can access my content from any console anywhere in the world, so long as no one else is using it.

More to the point, it won't hurt sales.  My inclusion as a part of someone else's "family" may be temporary and fleeting.  So my ability to play the game one day, vs. the next will be up to whoever's family I am in.  But with multiplayer games, I'm SOL.  I can't play a game with my friend AND play the game myself.  I have to buy the game.

So, it won't really be different from how things work today, just you family member you share with won't necessarily live right down the road from you or won't necessarily be a family member.  It can be anyone you know.  Their right to the game lasts as long as you give them access to it.  Once that's gone, you'll need a new "family" to get it from or just buy it yourself.

How does the policy HELP sales?




Your reply to me says you are.  They cannot check multiple people aren't playing at the same time unless they force that account to be signed in, meaning you need give other people your account details.  Otherwise people could just sign out and play at the same time, since they said this is not possible, always online must be a requirement for the friends/family.

Your reply to me says your reading comprehension is subpar.

I'm going to put this really simply to you...If you can't understand this by the time I'm finshed, I'm done with this conversation. 

On Xbox One, all your content is available in the cloud for access anytime, anywhere -- by you or by anyone you give you access to your gaming library.  When you buy a game via retail on a disc, or if you buy it digitally via Xbox LIVE, it becomes available, instantly, in the cloud.

The only "account detail" necessary is for me to know someone's gamertag, and presumably that gamertag is already a part of my friend's list.  Once I've setup my "Faimly" by adding gamertags from my friends list on Xbox LIVE, then Xbox LIVE knows who I've given access to my games.  I may do this on my console, but Xbox LIVE has all the details.

Yes, anyone who is in my "family" accessing a game in my library, will need to be online and signed in with the gamertag (account) that's in my "family" list.  This is all logical.

They do not need my account information and I do not need their account information.  Their console won't be talking to my console at all, not unless we're Skyping, at which point then yes, you are correct, my console will absolutely, positively, 100% need to be online with me signed into it. 

But as it stands, right now, if I'm not logged in, or some devastating act of nature wipes out my home and console, then anyone who I previously setup in my family list will still be in my family list and they will have access to my content.  



Your console would have to be always online, even when playing single player using the family share technique.  24 hour check in is not sufficient.  Otherwise, you would be able to do an online check in, disconnect from your network, and then start playing a "family shared game" off-line.  How would they know of a conflict (when someone else tries to play) then?



g911turbo said:

How does the policy HELP sales?

I never said it would help sales.  I don't think it's any different than loaning a disc out. 

Loaning a disc out doesn't hurt sales nor does it necessarily help sales.  If the person who got to play the game liked it, they'll buy it, but if they can't be bothered buying it then they won't.

Same will hold true with lending a digital copy.  Someone may like the game a lot and want to buy it after playing it.  If they do, there is a sale, but if they don't, there isn't. 

It's a 1:1. 

DRM may be a giant dildo up the anus, but with a good amount of lube and a little patience, it actually feels quite good.  Or to put it less poetically, DRM doesn't have to be painful.  It can give you as good of an experience as having a physical disc can.



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We will find out at Gamescom most likely when MS will reveal a few more exclusives as well.



Right now there is A LOT of hear say in this thread. Microsoft has posted some basic rules, but there are still a lot of details that can make or break what they are doing. I'm on the fence.

500 dollar price tag doesn't help either. At this rate, i'll be happy to wait 3-6 months before buying this console and kill 2 birds with one stone. More titles released, and no more guessing as to whats what with this DRM stuff.



g911turbo said:
Right now there is A LOT of hear say in this thread. Microsoft has posted some basic rules, but there are still a lot of details that can make or break what they are doing. I'm on the fence.

500 dollar price tag doesn't help either. At this rate, i'll be happy to wait 3-6 months before buying this console and kill 2 birds with one stone. More titles released, and no more guessing as to whats what with this DRM stuff.


I'd say the information is quite clear, it seems some people just don't want to believe the DRM can actually provide benefits like this.



slowmo said:
g911turbo said:
Right now there is A LOT of hear say in this thread. Microsoft has posted some basic rules, but there are still a lot of details that can make or break what they are doing. I'm on the fence.

500 dollar price tag doesn't help either. At this rate, i'll be happy to wait 3-6 months before buying this console and kill 2 birds with one stone. More titles released, and no more guessing as to whats what with this DRM stuff.


I'd say the information is quite clear, it seems some people just don't want to believe the DRM can actually provide benefits like this.

Said the guy in a halo MC suit.  LOL

Even Microsoft employees are saying that more details are coming, etc.  I'm not saying it will be bad, I'm just saying details are still pending



if people buy this thing it will be 5 family members next gen...im not giving them an inch on this crap