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You people want MOAR Power in 8th Gen consoles, but........

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Player2 said:
Turkish said:
Mazty said:
Turkish said:


1080p was about getting the price to come down? What are you talking about? You don't make sense. The first 50" 1080p plasma cost around $15,000 back in 2006. Over time they got cheaper, the average tv size has been getting bigger and will continue to get bigger as they gradually become affordable. I hear today many people say they wished they bought a bigger tv afterwards getting a 42-46" set. You're again ill informed about the sizes 4K come in, Sony will release a 55" 4K tv in spring. Here's the average screen sizes from 2002-2009. TVs got bigger and they will continue to get bigger.

 

 

 

In due time 4K will be affordable, once they're affordable so will there be an increase in content. If there was no substance to the quest for greater resolution, then no one would've cared about Retina displays or 1080p on smartphones. 4K is another part of the pixel density war.


For fucks sake let me repeat myself:

Ultimately, the issue with 4k is not the price, it's the size, and that won't

change over time.

Many people won't, and can't, fit a 60+" TV in their living room.

 

Understand? You don't seem to understand living room size. In Japan and Europe, rooms are much smaller than in the USA. Your chart shows that it has plateaued at 46", which backs my point up. 

 

You fail to comprehend what I'm saying. There is a relation between the price and size of a tv screen. You are ill informed if you think people can't fit a 60" tv in their living room. Do you have a source to backup your claim? Any study that proves you right? How do you know rooms in Europe are much smaller? Thats just your assumption with no truth. (I live in Europe and I have enough room to fit in a +80" tv.) My chart is also from 2009. You're accepting your assumption as true without proof which again makes no sense.

Fact is that average tv sizes increase. http://www.displaysearchblog.com/2012/10/average-size-of-lcd-tv-panels-increases-by-2-inches-in-12-months/

There are several factors leading to increases in the average LCD TV panel size:

  • The emergence of new sizes has led many customers to choose larger sizes, such as moving from 26W to 29W, from 37W to 39W, from 46/47 to 50 inch, and from 55 to 60 inch.
  • As consumers replace older LCD TVs, they tend to choose a larger size. Many consumers in North America originally had a 32 inch LCD TV in their bedroom and a 40-50 inch set in their living room, and are upgrading to a 39 or 40 inch in their bedroom and a 50 inch or larger set for the living room.
  • LCD TV brands are promoting larger sizes in order to preserve profit margins.

With the year-end, many promotions will be launched, such as the rumored 60 inch LCD TV for $999 on Black Friday. With such attractive prices on large size LCD TVs, we can expect other consumers to migrate to larger sizes, further driving increases in average screen size.

Once 60" TVs become affordable at 999 you bet your bottom $ they'll be what people buy when they're in the market for a new tv with the budget.

Ok, I'll finish this.

"Based on panel makers’ shipments reported in the Monthly TFT LCD Shipment Database, the average TV panel diagonal has increased from 34.8” in August, 2011 to 36.8” in August, 2012. With a typical range of 18-20M panel shipment per month, an increase of 2 inches in screen size is significant, and has helped to increase area demand."

"Sharp has the highest average screen size of TV panels shipped, and it grew significantly in the past year, from 39.1 to 48.3 inches. Most other panel makers saw an increase of approximately 2 inches in screen size over the past year. AUO increased from 34.4 to 36 inches, BOE from 29.9 to 32.7 inches, Chimei Innolux from 30.9 to 33.6 inches, LG Display from 36.2 to 38.9 inches, and Samsung from 37 to 39.4 inches."

The current trend is an increase in 2 inches per year.

The average in the industry (not Sharp's) was 36.8" in August 2012. To reach an average of 60" we'll need over 11 years. We'll be playing with the PS5 then.

The source is the same article you used to cherrypick all that.

I'll be good and ignore the trick hidden in the 2002-2009 graph.


Eh I never talked about an average of 60".



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thismeintiel said:
Turkish said:


I think you're acting immature with your constant use of fuck. Neither fuck nor putting your text in bold is bringing more truth to your claim. As I've already showed you the average tv screen sizes increasing, there is really nothing to discuss anymore, you keep coming back to me without any source or proof. I asked you to provide a source backing up your ridicilous claim that European rooms are smaller than American ones, but you haven't, neither did you for your other assumption that people won't/can't fit a 60" tv in their living room.

I think the his whole argument is void when you consider anyone saying you can't tell the difference between 1080P and 4K, unless you have a X" screen is full up BS.  We had the same arguments back when people were arguing we didn't need 720P or 1080P TVs, cause you couldn't tell the difference between them and 480P unless the screen is so big.  You can ALWAYS tell the difference when there is a increase in PPI, even on a small iPhone.  Well, unless you have poor eyesight.

It's just like th chart Gilgmesh just posted.  Do you think people even follow those guidelines?  Hell no.  Later this year, or sometime next year, I plan on getting a 75" Laservue.  Now, it will most likely be only 8' away from my couch, while that chart would suggest the distance should be around 9-9.5' away from each other.  I don't care what some chart says, but I'm damn sure its going to look much better than the 52"  TV I got, now.

Indeed, you can find a lot of threads dating from 2006-2007 of people questionning the need of 1080p. My 50" tv from 2,5m is definetly not big enough for me. In a few years when I'm in the market for a new tv I'll go for +65"



Turkish said:
Player2 said:
Turkish said:
Mazty said:
Turkish said:


1080p was about getting the price to come down? What are you talking about? You don't make sense. The first 50" 1080p plasma cost around $15,000 back in 2006. Over time they got cheaper, the average tv size has been getting bigger and will continue to get bigger as they gradually become affordable. I hear today many people say they wished they bought a bigger tv afterwards getting a 42-46" set. You're again ill informed about the sizes 4K come in, Sony will release a 55" 4K tv in spring. Here's the average screen sizes from 2002-2009. TVs got bigger and they will continue to get bigger.

 

 

 

In due time 4K will be affordable, once they're affordable so will there be an increase in content. If there was no substance to the quest for greater resolution, then no one would've cared about Retina displays or 1080p on smartphones. 4K is another part of the pixel density war.


For fucks sake let me repeat myself:

Ultimately, the issue with 4k is not the price, it's the size, and that won't

change over time.

Many people won't, and can't, fit a 60+" TV in their living room.

 

Understand? You don't seem to understand living room size. In Japan and Europe, rooms are much smaller than in the USA. Your chart shows that it has plateaued at 46", which backs my point up. 

 

You fail to comprehend what I'm saying. There is a relation between the price and size of a tv screen. You are ill informed if you think people can't fit a 60" tv in their living room. Do you have a source to backup your claim? Any study that proves you right? How do you know rooms in Europe are much smaller? Thats just your assumption with no truth. (I live in Europe and I have enough room to fit in a +80" tv.) My chart is also from 2009. You're accepting your assumption as true without proof which again makes no sense.

Fact is that average tv sizes increase. http://www.displaysearchblog.com/2012/10/average-size-of-lcd-tv-panels-increases-by-2-inches-in-12-months/

There are several factors leading to increases in the average LCD TV panel size:

  • The emergence of new sizes has led many customers to choose larger sizes, such as moving from 26W to 29W, from 37W to 39W, from 46/47 to 50 inch, and from 55 to 60 inch.
  • As consumers replace older LCD TVs, they tend to choose a larger size. Many consumers in North America originally had a 32 inch LCD TV in their bedroom and a 40-50 inch set in their living room, and are upgrading to a 39 or 40 inch in their bedroom and a 50 inch or larger set for the living room.
  • LCD TV brands are promoting larger sizes in order to preserve profit margins.

With the year-end, many promotions will be launched, such as the rumored 60 inch LCD TV for $999 on Black Friday. With such attractive prices on large size LCD TVs, we can expect other consumers to migrate to larger sizes, further driving increases in average screen size.

Once 60" TVs become affordable at 999 you bet your bottom $ they'll be what people buy when they're in the market for a new tv with the budget.

Ok, I'll finish this.

"Based on panel makers’ shipments reported in the Monthly TFT LCD Shipment Database, the average TV panel diagonal has increased from 34.8” in August, 2011 to 36.8” in August, 2012. With a typical range of 18-20M panel shipment per month, an increase of 2 inches in screen size is significant, and has helped to increase area demand."

"Sharp has the highest average screen size of TV panels shipped, and it grew significantly in the past year, from 39.1 to 48.3 inches. Most other panel makers saw an increase of approximately 2 inches in screen size over the past year. AUO increased from 34.4 to 36 inches, BOE from 29.9 to 32.7 inches, Chimei Innolux from 30.9 to 33.6 inches, LG Display from 36.2 to 38.9 inches, and Samsung from 37 to 39.4 inches."

The current trend is an increase in 2 inches per year.

The average in the industry (not Sharp's) was 36.8" in August 2012. To reach an average of 60" we'll need over 11 years. We'll be playing with the PS5 then.

The source is the same article you used to cherrypick all that.

I'll be good and ignore the trick hidden in the 2002-2009 graph.


Eh I never talked about an average of 60".

The paragraph below "Television size over the years" points to that.



Player2 said:
Turkish said:
Player2 said:
Turkish said:
Mazty said:
Turkish said:


1080p was about getting the price to come down? What are you talking about? You don't make sense. The first 50" 1080p plasma cost around $15,000 back in 2006. Over time they got cheaper, the average tv size has been getting bigger and will continue to get bigger as they gradually become affordable. I hear today many people say they wished they bought a bigger tv afterwards getting a 42-46" set. You're again ill informed about the sizes 4K come in, Sony will release a 55" 4K tv in spring. Here's the average screen sizes from 2002-2009. TVs got bigger and they will continue to get bigger.

 

 

 

In due time 4K will be affordable, once they're affordable so will there be an increase in content. If there was no substance to the quest for greater resolution, then no one would've cared about Retina displays or 1080p on smartphones. 4K is another part of the pixel density war.


For fucks sake let me repeat myself:

Ultimately, the issue with 4k is not the price, it's the size, and that won't

change over time.

Many people won't, and can't, fit a 60+" TV in their living room.

 

Understand? You don't seem to understand living room size. In Japan and Europe, rooms are much smaller than in the USA. Your chart shows that it has plateaued at 46", which backs my point up. 

 

You fail to comprehend what I'm saying. There is a relation between the price and size of a tv screen. You are ill informed if you think people can't fit a 60" tv in their living room. Do you have a source to backup your claim? Any study that proves you right? How do you know rooms in Europe are much smaller? Thats just your assumption with no truth. (I live in Europe and I have enough room to fit in a +80" tv.) My chart is also from 2009. You're accepting your assumption as true without proof which again makes no sense.

Fact is that average tv sizes increase. http://www.displaysearchblog.com/2012/10/average-size-of-lcd-tv-panels-increases-by-2-inches-in-12-months/

There are several factors leading to increases in the average LCD TV panel size:

  • The emergence of new sizes has led many customers to choose larger sizes, such as moving from 26W to 29W, from 37W to 39W, from 46/47 to 50 inch, and from 55 to 60 inch.
  • As consumers replace older LCD TVs, they tend to choose a larger size. Many consumers in North America originally had a 32 inch LCD TV in their bedroom and a 40-50 inch set in their living room, and are upgrading to a 39 or 40 inch in their bedroom and a 50 inch or larger set for the living room.
  • LCD TV brands are promoting larger sizes in order to preserve profit margins.

With the year-end, many promotions will be launched, such as the rumored 60 inch LCD TV for $999 on Black Friday. With such attractive prices on large size LCD TVs, we can expect other consumers to migrate to larger sizes, further driving increases in average screen size.

Once 60" TVs become affordable at 999 you bet your bottom $ they'll be what people buy when they're in the market for a new tv with the budget.

Ok, I'll finish this.

"Based on panel makers’ shipments reported in the Monthly TFT LCD Shipment Database, the average TV panel diagonal has increased from 34.8” in August, 2011 to 36.8” in August, 2012. With a typical range of 18-20M panel shipment per month, an increase of 2 inches in screen size is significant, and has helped to increase area demand."

"Sharp has the highest average screen size of TV panels shipped, and it grew significantly in the past year, from 39.1 to 48.3 inches. Most other panel makers saw an increase of approximately 2 inches in screen size over the past year. AUO increased from 34.4 to 36 inches, BOE from 29.9 to 32.7 inches, Chimei Innolux from 30.9 to 33.6 inches, LG Display from 36.2 to 38.9 inches, and Samsung from 37 to 39.4 inches."

The current trend is an increase in 2 inches per year.

The average in the industry (not Sharp's) was 36.8" in August 2012. To reach an average of 60" we'll need over 11 years. We'll be playing with the PS5 then.

The source is the same article you used to cherrypick all that.

I'll be good and ignore the trick hidden in the 2002-2009 graph.


Eh I never talked about an average of 60".

The paragraph below "Television size over the years" points to that.

Thay may be, I never talked about an average of 60", the point I was making was that average screen sizes are increasing, are you challenging this fact?



Shooters will take advantage of the more power because of their immense popularity. Anything else - probably not.



"Naturally the common people don't want war: Neither in Russia, nor in England, nor for that matter in Germany. That is understood. But, after all, IT IS THE LEADERS of the country who determine the policy and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship. Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is TELL THEM THEY ARE BEING ATTACKED, and denounce the peacemakers for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. IT WORKS THE SAME IN ANY COUNTRY."  --Hermann Goering, leading Nazi party member, at the Nuremberg War Crime Trials 

 

Conservatives:  Pushing for a small enough government to be a guest in your living room, or even better - your uterus.

 

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IamAwsome said:
ToraTiger said:
I don't think Nintendo knows how to make hardware, that's why it's selling for a lost. And also I think it's the GamePad eating costs. It has a camera, motion controls, wireless and a touch screen

It's not that expensive. The camera is cheap, the motion is just like the PS3's sixaxis, all controllers these days are wireless, and tthe touch screen is resistive. 


I don't know, even  Iwate said that they were effectively make a handheld and a console. 



3DS I.D : 3282-2755-4646

I make bad threads.  

SSB really went downhill after Melee....

Manlet Crew

ToraTiger said:
IamAwsome said:
ToraTiger said:
I don't think Nintendo knows how to make hardware, that's why it's selling for a lost. And also I think it's the GamePad eating costs. It has a camera, motion controls, wireless and a touch screen

It's not that expensive. The camera is cheap, the motion is just like the PS3's sixaxis, all controllers these days are wireless, and tthe touch screen is resistive. 


I don't know, even  Iwate said that they were effectively make a handheld and a console. 

There's no official price but everything points out to the Gamepad costing between $85-$100 to manufacture. Compering that to a 360 controller which cost $20-$40 to manufacture you have a very expensive controller in your hands.



Nintendo and PC gamer

Turkish said:
Player2 said:
Turkish said:
Player2 said:
Turkish said:
Mazty said:
Turkish said:


1080p was about getting the price to come down? What are you talking about? You don't make sense. The first 50" 1080p plasma cost around $15,000 back in 2006. Over time they got cheaper, the average tv size has been getting bigger and will continue to get bigger as they gradually become affordable. I hear today many people say they wished they bought a bigger tv afterwards getting a 42-46" set. You're again ill informed about the sizes 4K come in, Sony will release a 55" 4K tv in spring. Here's the average screen sizes from 2002-2009. TVs got bigger and they will continue to get bigger.

 

 

 

In due time 4K will be affordable, once they're affordable so will there be an increase in content. If there was no substance to the quest for greater resolution, then no one would've cared about Retina displays or 1080p on smartphones. 4K is another part of the pixel density war.


For fucks sake let me repeat myself:

Ultimately, the issue with 4k is not the price, it's the size, and that won't

change over time.

Many people won't, and can't, fit a 60+" TV in their living room.

 

Understand? You don't seem to understand living room size. In Japan and Europe, rooms are much smaller than in the USA. Your chart shows that it has plateaued at 46", which backs my point up. 

 

You fail to comprehend what I'm saying. There is a relation between the price and size of a tv screen. You are ill informed if you think people can't fit a 60" tv in their living room. Do you have a source to backup your claim? Any study that proves you right? How do you know rooms in Europe are much smaller? Thats just your assumption with no truth. (I live in Europe and I have enough room to fit in a +80" tv.) My chart is also from 2009. You're accepting your assumption as true without proof which again makes no sense.

Fact is that average tv sizes increase. http://www.displaysearchblog.com/2012/10/average-size-of-lcd-tv-panels-increases-by-2-inches-in-12-months/

There are several factors leading to increases in the average LCD TV panel size:

  • The emergence of new sizes has led many customers to choose larger sizes, such as moving from 26W to 29W, from 37W to 39W, from 46/47 to 50 inch, and from 55 to 60 inch.
  • As consumers replace older LCD TVs, they tend to choose a larger size. Many consumers in North America originally had a 32 inch LCD TV in their bedroom and a 40-50 inch set in their living room, and are upgrading to a 39 or 40 inch in their bedroom and a 50 inch or larger set for the living room.
  • LCD TV brands are promoting larger sizes in order to preserve profit margins.

With the year-end, many promotions will be launched, such as the rumored 60 inch LCD TV for $999 on Black Friday. With such attractive prices on large size LCD TVs, we can expect other consumers to migrate to larger sizes, further driving increases in average screen size.

Once 60" TVs become affordable at 999 you bet your bottom $ they'll be what people buy when they're in the market for a new tv with the budget.

Ok, I'll finish this.

"Based on panel makers’ shipments reported in the Monthly TFT LCD Shipment Database, the average TV panel diagonal has increased from 34.8” in August, 2011 to 36.8” in August, 2012. With a typical range of 18-20M panel shipment per month, an increase of 2 inches in screen size is significant, and has helped to increase area demand."

"Sharp has the highest average screen size of TV panels shipped, and it grew significantly in the past year, from 39.1 to 48.3 inches. Most other panel makers saw an increase of approximately 2 inches in screen size over the past year. AUO increased from 34.4 to 36 inches, BOE from 29.9 to 32.7 inches, Chimei Innolux from 30.9 to 33.6 inches, LG Display from 36.2 to 38.9 inches, and Samsung from 37 to 39.4 inches."

The current trend is an increase in 2 inches per year.

The average in the industry (not Sharp's) was 36.8" in August 2012. To reach an average of 60" we'll need over 11 years. We'll be playing with the PS5 then.

The source is the same article you used to cherrypick all that.

I'll be good and ignore the trick hidden in the 2002-2009 graph.


Eh I never talked about an average of 60".

The paragraph below "Television size over the years" points to that.

Thay may be, I never talked about an average of 60", the point I was making was that average screen sizes are increasing, are you challenging this fact?

If you don't agree with something don't post it, or make it clear.

Tv diagonal length is increasing but it won't increase at the pace it did in 2002-2006.



Player2 said:
Turkish said:
Player2 said:
Turkish said:
Player2 said:
Turkish said:
Mazty said:
Turkish said:


1080p was about getting the price to come down? What are you talking about? You don't make sense. The first 50" 1080p plasma cost around $15,000 back in 2006. Over time they got cheaper, the average tv size has been getting bigger and will continue to get bigger as they gradually become affordable. I hear today many people say they wished they bought a bigger tv afterwards getting a 42-46" set. You're again ill informed about the sizes 4K come in, Sony will release a 55" 4K tv in spring. Here's the average screen sizes from 2002-2009. TVs got bigger and they will continue to get bigger.

 

 

 

In due time 4K will be affordable, once they're affordable so will there be an increase in content. If there was no substance to the quest for greater resolution, then no one would've cared about Retina displays or 1080p on smartphones. 4K is another part of the pixel density war.


For fucks sake let me repeat myself:

Ultimately, the issue with 4k is not the price, it's the size, and that won't

change over time.

Many people won't, and can't, fit a 60+" TV in their living room.

 

Understand? You don't seem to understand living room size. In Japan and Europe, rooms are much smaller than in the USA. Your chart shows that it has plateaued at 46", which backs my point up. 

 

You fail to comprehend what I'm saying. There is a relation between the price and size of a tv screen. You are ill informed if you think people can't fit a 60" tv in their living room. Do you have a source to backup your claim? Any study that proves you right? How do you know rooms in Europe are much smaller? Thats just your assumption with no truth. (I live in Europe and I have enough room to fit in a +80" tv.) My chart is also from 2009. You're accepting your assumption as true without proof which again makes no sense.

Fact is that average tv sizes increase. http://www.displaysearchblog.com/2012/10/average-size-of-lcd-tv-panels-increases-by-2-inches-in-12-months/

There are several factors leading to increases in the average LCD TV panel size:

  • The emergence of new sizes has led many customers to choose larger sizes, such as moving from 26W to 29W, from 37W to 39W, from 46/47 to 50 inch, and from 55 to 60 inch.
  • As consumers replace older LCD TVs, they tend to choose a larger size. Many consumers in North America originally had a 32 inch LCD TV in their bedroom and a 40-50 inch set in their living room, and are upgrading to a 39 or 40 inch in their bedroom and a 50 inch or larger set for the living room.
  • LCD TV brands are promoting larger sizes in order to preserve profit margins.

With the year-end, many promotions will be launched, such as the rumored 60 inch LCD TV for $999 on Black Friday. With such attractive prices on large size LCD TVs, we can expect other consumers to migrate to larger sizes, further driving increases in average screen size.

Once 60" TVs become affordable at 999 you bet your bottom $ they'll be what people buy when they're in the market for a new tv with the budget.

Ok, I'll finish this.

"Based on panel makers’ shipments reported in the Monthly TFT LCD Shipment Database, the average TV panel diagonal has increased from 34.8” in August, 2011 to 36.8” in August, 2012. With a typical range of 18-20M panel shipment per month, an increase of 2 inches in screen size is significant, and has helped to increase area demand."

"Sharp has the highest average screen size of TV panels shipped, and it grew significantly in the past year, from 39.1 to 48.3 inches. Most other panel makers saw an increase of approximately 2 inches in screen size over the past year. AUO increased from 34.4 to 36 inches, BOE from 29.9 to 32.7 inches, Chimei Innolux from 30.9 to 33.6 inches, LG Display from 36.2 to 38.9 inches, and Samsung from 37 to 39.4 inches."

The current trend is an increase in 2 inches per year.

The average in the industry (not Sharp's) was 36.8" in August 2012. To reach an average of 60" we'll need over 11 years. We'll be playing with the PS5 then.

The source is the same article you used to cherrypick all that.

I'll be good and ignore the trick hidden in the 2002-2009 graph.


Eh I never talked about an average of 60".

The paragraph below "Television size over the years" points to that.

Thay may be, I never talked about an average of 60", the point I was making was that average screen sizes are increasing, are you challenging this fact?

If you don't agree with something don't post it, or make it clear.

Tv diagonal length is increasing but it won't increase at the pace it did in 2002-2006.


You're vague. Do you mean the Sharp prediction for 2015? If thats the only thing you got from my comments, then you missed the point rather spectacularly.



Because there will be much more development of third party games for the HHD Twins and much more hype as well. Places and Media Events like Spike's Video Game Awards will cover these new systems in such glowing terms and so extensively that they'll have to sell.