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The Official Legend of Zelda Thread: Link's Awakening (NS) Sells 3.13 million Copies in 11 Days

Forums - Nintendo Discussion - The Official Legend of Zelda Thread: Link's Awakening (NS) Sells 3.13 million Copies in 11 Days

How would you score Link's Awakening (NS) out of 10?

10 4 12.90%
 
9 9 29.03%
 
8 7 22.58%
 
7 5 16.13%
 
6 3 9.68%
 
5 2 6.45%
 
4 1 3.23%
 
3 0 0.00%
 
2 0 0.00%
 
1 0 0.00%
 
Total:31
Kai_Mao said:
I find this opinion on lack of story quite interesting. For a game with this much freedom, I think the story was bound to be on the way side as it's difficult to keep a linear-type of story compelling enough for players who play 80-100 hours into the game mostly exploring the world. I mean, I also heard of some opinions that while MGS5 and RDR2 had great open world concepts, when they tried to provide a compelling narrative, it was a bit flat as there was a sense of disconnect while trying to complete missions or playing for a certain amount of time in the open world.

You may have to sacrifice one thing for another when it comes to an open world narrative. Zelda BoTW was a complete open world game, meaning you can do whatever you want and go wherever you want to go as your imagination is the only thing holding you back. Thus, the story was built through pieces of text found in various aspects of the world or through dialogue and cutscenes/memories. Whereas games like The Witcher 3 and Batman Arkham City (didn't play TW3 yet but its just from what I heard) had great narratives, but not necessarily open worlds that you can do whatever you like (they still had directional marks you have to get to). Even Aonuma acknowledged from E3 2014, with Wind Waker, while they made a vast open world, you couldn't "cut through the boundaries wherever you like to explore [Wind Waker's] world." It may not necessarily was affected by the story, but even then the narrative was not that deep, although compelling to the overall lore of the Zelda franchise.

Play TW3 when you can.

I personally see the future Zelda games using BOTW's approach only instead of memories you get events e.g. you're exploring then you come to Hateno village and a story event is triggered when you arrive. This way the open freedom is maintained with the game being more story driven.



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Things I would like in a BOTW sequel

1. More dungeons. Fleshed out like previous series entries like OOT.
2.. Rain gear. Much like we have gear fore fire,water,cold, give us gear that lets us climb easier with less slip in the rain.
3, Sky areas. I've always been a sucker for sky type of areas and I feel having a dungeon in the sky or something similar(boss battle) would be cool

other than that, i dont really see too much that needs to be changed.



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PwerlvlAmy said:
Things I would like in a BOTW sequel

1. More dungeons. Fleshed out like previous series entries like OOT.
2.. Rain gear. Much like we have gear fore fire,water,cold, give us gear that lets us climb easier with less slip in the rain.
3, Sky areas. I've always been a sucker for sky type of areas and I feel having a dungeon in the sky or something similar(boss battle) would be cool

other than that, i dont really see too much that needs to be changed.

Always thought that a missed opportunity in BOTW was that as you upgrade the climbing-gear you should have gotten rain-immunity.



Nothing to see here, move along

Speaking of the weather I'd like to see them implement more weather types.



more caves and under water exploration are the main things i want in a botw sequel



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irstupid said:
All I care about with the next Zelda game is that I can have max stamina AND max hearts. That bugs me more than anything in the entire game. I was so happy when i heard the number of new shrines in the DLC, thinking that number matched the number needed to max out hearts to 30. BUT NO.

That's quite interesting, I'm completely opposite, I loathe modern game designs (which are so prevalent these days) that practically allow you to unlock all skills and max all stats - IMO, your character should be representation of your choices, and those are always limiting.



HoloDust said:
irstupid said:
All I care about with the next Zelda game is that I can have max stamina AND max hearts. That bugs me more than anything in the entire game. I was so happy when i heard the number of new shrines in the DLC, thinking that number matched the number needed to max out hearts to 30. BUT NO.

That's quite interesting, I'm completely opposite, I loathe modern game designs (which are so prevalent these days) that practically allow you to unlock all skills and max all stats - IMO, your character should be representation of your choices, and those are always limiting.

That's purely down to taste and personal preference, but if there's one thing Zelda was never about it's limiting the player to specific choices.



Baddman said:
more caves and under water exploration are the main things i want in a botw sequel

 

I personally think a Samurai Jack story arch for Zelda would break the world for how awesome that would be. A third of the game in the past, preparing for war in a lush and colorful world and the remaining two thirds spent in a futuristic world ruled by an immortal Gannon where link has to assumable an army to finally end the thousand year reign of Gannon. It's why I loved BOTW so much, it reminds me of Samurai Jack lite. 

More caves, under ground cities and networks, stronger enemies which force you to use those underground networks and greater ability to customize the world through your actions. 



Wyrdness said:
Kai_Mao said:
I find this opinion on lack of story quite interesting. For a game with this much freedom, I think the story was bound to be on the way side as it's difficult to keep a linear-type of story compelling enough for players who play 80-100 hours into the game mostly exploring the world. I mean, I also heard of some opinions that while MGS5 and RDR2 had great open world concepts, when they tried to provide a compelling narrative, it was a bit flat as there was a sense of disconnect while trying to complete missions or playing for a certain amount of time in the open world.

You may have to sacrifice one thing for another when it comes to an open world narrative. Zelda BoTW was a complete open world game, meaning you can do whatever you want and go wherever you want to go as your imagination is the only thing holding you back. Thus, the story was built through pieces of text found in various aspects of the world or through dialogue and cutscenes/memories. Whereas games like The Witcher 3 and Batman Arkham City (didn't play TW3 yet but its just from what I heard) had great narratives, but not necessarily open worlds that you can do whatever you like (they still had directional marks you have to get to). Even Aonuma acknowledged from E3 2014, with Wind Waker, while they made a vast open world, you couldn't "cut through the boundaries wherever you like to explore [Wind Waker's] world." It may not necessarily was affected by the story, but even then the narrative was not that deep, although compelling to the overall lore of the Zelda franchise.

Play TW3 when you can.

I personally see the future Zelda games using BOTW's approach only instead of memories you get events e.g. you're exploring then you come to Hateno village and a story event is triggered when you arrive. This way the open freedom is maintained with the game being more story driven.

I will when I can. Just gotta get through 2 first and then get to 3 haha.

I think it would be cool to see a little more meat into Zelda's story that fits within the BoTW open world concept. If they want to do a sequel or 100 years later sequel to BoTW but focus more on the present day issues instead of going back and forth from the past to the present like they did with Zelda and the Champions.



Veknoid_Outcast said:
curl-6 said:

Annoying that twitter links don't seem to work properly on VGChartz these days, at least for me, but holy smokes, every time I think I've seen everything this game can offer, some new flavour of beautiful insanity emerges.

Making a worthy sequel to this game is going to quite frankly be one of the most near-insurmountable tasks in the history of gaming. I don't envy the Zelda team, expectations are going to be stratospheric.

I think the good news is that the bones of Breath of the Wild are so great that simply layering on new stories, characters, maps, and dungeons will probably be sufficient to turn out another masterpiece.

The bad news is that the novelty and the sense of discovery of Breath of the Wild will probably be difficulty to recreate in a sequel. We might have to wait another 20 years for something as momentous as BoTW.

That's the thing though, I can easily see how they can improve the formula established by BOTW to do a game that "more of the same but better", but such a game won't evoke as much of a wow factor as BOTW did cos it won't be as revolutionary. Not that a game needs to be revolutionary to be great, but I think that almost no matter what they do with the sequel, it will never receive quite the same sky-high acclaim as BOTW.