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Nintendo fires back at critics who say they rehash their games

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xLeftyx said:
noname2200 said:
xLeftyx said:
Critics' analysis can easily be deflated by, hmm, let's see... actually developing more and NEW IPs other than their flagship mascots or the Wii series.

If I can list some new IPs other than their flagship mascots or the Wii series that they've published over the past couple of years, will you admit that you spoke out of ignorance and that your opinion is therefore completely invalid?

Really, I can wiki it myself but I'm actually referring more to Nintendo-developed games but for the sake of argument please do. While you're at it, gauge and list how much production value Nintendo has put in it and how have they conveyed the importance of these IPs in the form of advertisement the same way they do with their flagship titles.

But I'm not here to argue, because when a statement is definitively false (and could be disproven with a quick google search, but thank you for admitting that you're actively avoiding becoming informed before making a statement), an argument simply isn't possible. I'm inclined to believe then that you won't admit that you're ignorant on the matter, and that your opinion isn't worth the electricity it took to post it.



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noname2200 said:
xLeftyx said:
noname2200 said:
xLeftyx said:
Critics' analysis can easily be deflated by, hmm, let's see... actually developing more and NEW IPs other than their flagship mascots or the Wii series.

If I can list some new IPs other than their flagship mascots or the Wii series that they've published over the past couple of years, will you admit that you spoke out of ignorance and that your opinion is therefore completely invalid?

Really, I can wiki it myself but I'm actually referring more to Nintendo-developed games but for the sake of argument please do. While you're at it, gauge and list how much production value Nintendo has put in it and how have they conveyed the importance of these IPs in the form of advertisement the same way they do with their flagship titles.

But I'm not here to argue, because when a statement is definitively false (and could be disproven with a quick google search, but thank you for admitting that you're actively avoiding becoming informed before making a statement), an argument simply isn't possible. I'm inclined to believe then that you won't admit that you're ignorant on the matter, and that your opinion isn't worth the electricity it took to post it.

Argument aside, my opinion still stands that Nintendo mainly puts in so much production value in the same IPs (Mario mainly). I have a post above my reply to you



Sure and maybe Philly sould get rid of the Philly frenetic because he is oversaturated with chlorinated fantastic overexposed? Clearly Charlie and Frank should beat him sensitively...



 

F0X said:

Why do that? Xenoblade was one of the best Wii games and its sales weren't so hot.

The fact that it took Rainfall to even localized the game in the west shows Nintendo themselves didn't fully believe in the product. Xenoblade, The Last Story, and Pandora's Tower felt more of a filler more than anything.

Remember Monster Hunter for Wii? That's not Nintendo owned yet Nintendo advertised that game to the fullest. Now, that's establishing an IP anomalous to Wii demographic. They believed in it.

 

Overall, I think Nintendo is holding themselves back. If we have more Nintendo-developed IPs with great production value, that'd give us as gamers more choices. In addition, this will eliminate the questions in their seriousness in attracting the core demographic.


Operation Rainfall didn't localize the game by any means. Xenoblade was planned for release in Europe well before Rainfall took place (the reaction was based on Nintendo of America's apparent lack of plans). Once the game was localized in English (not to mention receiving much praise and admiration by European reviewers) it became much easier for NoA to profit off a North American release. Nintendo has every reason not to expect solid sales - it was an unproven IP and a Japanese-developed RPG.

Contrast with Monster Hunter. MH was hugely popular in Japan, so it was a much safer bet. Also it already had a dedicated fanbase due to the PSP entries.

Even so, I agree. Nintendo could have more new IPs and market them more aggressively. Or they could get their act together and bring back more well-missed older ones, because there's no point in having dormant, irrelevant brands like Sony.



3DS Friend Code: 0645 - 5827 - 5788
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TruckOSaurus said:

You clearly don't know what Mario games are about if you think they're  about "rescuing the princess".


Agreed, Mario is about level design and tight controls.  If anyone knows of a better plat former released in 2012 than NSMB2 let me know because that was a joy to run through multiple times.



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F0X said:

 

F0X said:

Why do that? Xenoblade was one of the best Wii games and its sales weren't so hot.

The fact that it took Rainfall to even localized the game in the west shows Nintendo themselves didn't fully believe in the product. Xenoblade, The Last Story, and Pandora's Tower felt more of a filler more than anything.

Remember Monster Hunter for Wii? That's not Nintendo owned yet Nintendo advertised that game to the fullest. Now, that's establishing an IP anomalous to Wii demographic. They believed in it.

 

Overall, I think Nintendo is holding themselves back. If we have more Nintendo-developed IPs with great production value, that'd give us as gamers more choices. In addition, this will eliminate the questions in their seriousness in attracting the core demographic.


Operation Rainfall didn't localize the game by any means. Xenoblade was planned for release in Europe well before Rainfall took place (the reaction was based on Nintendo of America's apparent lack of plans). Once the game was localized in English (not to mention receiving much praise and admiration by European reviewers) it became much easier for NoA to profit off a North American release. Nintendo has every reason not to expect solid sales - it was an unproven IP and a Japanese-developed RPG.

Contrast with Monster Hunter. MH was hugely popular in Japan, so it was a much safer bet. Also it already had a dedicated fanbase due to the PSP entries.

Even so, I agree. Nintendo could have more new IPs and market them more aggressively. Or they could get their act together and bring back more well-missed older ones, because there's no point in having dormant, irrelevant brands like Sony.

I think this would stop most of the "complaints" about Nintendo rehashing franchises. If they were more willing to put some marketing muscle behind a few new IPs or games then the people complaining about rehashes would just look silly. Xenoblade is the perfect example. I only heard about the game through forums. Little to no marketing, they didn't even localise it in America until the EU had proven its success and yet it's probably the best JRPG on home consoles this gen. A little bit more on marketing could have gone a long way.



Scoobes said:
F0X said:

 

F0X said:

Why do that? Xenoblade was one of the best Wii games and its sales weren't so hot.

The fact that it took Rainfall to even localized the game in the west shows Nintendo themselves didn't fully believe in the product. Xenoblade, The Last Story, and Pandora's Tower felt more of a filler more than anything.

Remember Monster Hunter for Wii? That's not Nintendo owned yet Nintendo advertised that game to the fullest. Now, that's establishing an IP anomalous to Wii demographic. They believed in it.

 

Overall, I think Nintendo is holding themselves back. If we have more Nintendo-developed IPs with great production value, that'd give us as gamers more choices. In addition, this will eliminate the questions in their seriousness in attracting the core demographic.


Operation Rainfall didn't localize the game by any means. Xenoblade was planned for release in Europe well before Rainfall took place (the reaction was based on Nintendo of America's apparent lack of plans). Once the game was localized in English (not to mention receiving much praise and admiration by European reviewers) it became much easier for NoA to profit off a North American release. Nintendo has every reason not to expect solid sales - it was an unproven IP and a Japanese-developed RPG.

Contrast with Monster Hunter. MH was hugely popular in Japan, so it was a much safer bet. Also it already had a dedicated fanbase due to the PSP entries.

Even so, I agree. Nintendo could have more new IPs and market them more aggressively. Or they could get their act together and bring back more well-missed older ones, because there's no point in having dormant, irrelevant brands like Sony.

I think this would stop most of the "complaints" about Nintendo rehashing franchises. If they were more willing to put some marketing muscle behind a few new IPs or games then the people complaining about rehashes would just look silly. Xenoblade is the perfect example. I only heard about the game through forums. Little to no marketing, they didn't even localise it in America until the EU had proven its success and yet it's probably the best JRPG on home consoles this gen. A little bit more on marketing could have gone a long way.


The only ads for Xenoblade I've seen in NA were online ads on sites like IGN. I think the European release got a bit more marketing, as Nintendo actually had a YouTube channel (includes spoiler-free tutorial) and also had spme TV ads, too.

As it is, publishers sometimes have a difficult time realizing when the market is starved for a bold new entry in a underappreciated genre. I'm not sure if I can blame them for it, though.



3DS Friend Code: 0645 - 5827 - 5788
WayForward Kickstarter is best kickstarter: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1236620800/shantae-half-genie-hero

Augen said:
TruckOSaurus said:

You clearly don't know what Mario games are about if you think they're  about "rescuing the princess".


Agreed, Mario is about level design and tight controls.  If anyone knows of a better plat former released in 2012 than NSMB2 let me know because that was a joy to run through multiple times.

this +1000!

unlike many other games, the learning curve for Mario games is almost non-existing, and not because the games are easy, but because the controls are so damn goodlike!



Menx64

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menx64 said:
Augen said:
TruckOSaurus said:

You clearly don't know what Mario games are about if you think they're  about "rescuing the princess".

Agreed, Mario is about level design and tight controls.  If anyone knows of a better plat former released in 2012 than NSMB2 let me know because that was a joy to run through multiple times.

this +1000!

unlike many other games, the learning curve for Mario games is almost non-existing, and not because the games are easy, but because the controls are so damn goodlike!

And if Nintendo rehashes so much and still sell boat loads, why hadn't anyone else make a competent platformer to dethrone Mario?



Galaki said:
menx64 said:
Augen said:
TruckOSaurus said:

You clearly don't know what Mario games are about if you think they're  about "rescuing the princess".

Agreed, Mario is about level design and tight controls.  If anyone knows of a better plat former released in 2012 than NSMB2 let me know because that was a joy to run through multiple times.

this +1000!

unlike many other games, the learning curve for Mario games is almost non-existing, and not because the games are easy, but because the controls are so damn goodlike!

And if Nintendo rehashes so much and still sell boat loads, why hadn't anyone else make a competent platformer to dethrone Mario?

Because Mario has been consistenly building a fanbase since the NES days.  He's been involved in several of the most highly acclaimed games of all time.  He helped define console gaming with Super Mario Bros, and 3D gaming with Super Mario 64.  Few series can match the consistend continued excellence that Mario has maintained for over 25 years.

It's simple why nobody has made a platformer to dethrone Mario.  Mario has a well deserved reputation.  Gamers of all ages and experience levels know if they pick up a Mario game they're going to get an incredibly fun experience, and aside from a few missteps, they've always been right.

There have been other very good platformers.  Little Big Planet, Donkey Kong Country Returns, and Rayman Origins, were all great games.  However, none of those games were part of a franchise that has been so good for so long and has done so much in shaping gaming in general.  If any franchise is ever going to topple Mario they're going to have to work for at least a decade at building a fanbase, and they're going to have to put out some truly revolutionary games to gain attention.