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House Fast-Tracks CISPA Vote, Passes it with Horrible New Amendments
April 26, 2012

In what can only be described as a dirty hat trick, U.S. House of Representatives quickly amended the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act(CISPA) and then brought the bill to the floor for a vote a day earlier than was scheduled. The fast and dirty vote on the bill led to it being approved by a vote of 248-168 (15 no votes). You can see if your representative voted for the bill by checking out this document.

Pushing the bill through at mach 10 is bad enough, but what's worse are the amendments that Rep. Ben Quayle (R - AZ) managed to get added. These amendments make CISPA infinitely worse than it already was. Here is what TechDirt says the amendments add to CISPA:

Previously, CISPA allowed the government to use information for "cybersecurity" or "national security" purposes. Those purposes have not been limited or removed. Instead, three more valid uses have been added: investigation and prosecution of cybersecurity crime, protection of individuals, and protection of children. Cybersecurity crime is defined as any crime involving network disruption or hacking, plus any violation of the CFAA.

Basically this means CISPA can no longer be called a cybersecurity bill at all. The government would be able to search information it collects under CISPA for the purposes of investigating American citizens with complete immunity from all privacy protections as long as they can claim someone committed a "cybersecurity crime". Basically it says the 4th Amendment does not apply online, at all. Moreover, the government could do whatever it wants with the data as long as it can claim that someone was in danger of bodily harm, or that children were somehow threatened—again, notwithstanding absolutely any other law that would normally limit the government's power.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation has a lengthy write-up on the other amendments that made it into CISPA here. If you want to see exactly what this bill is all about you can read the entire thing here. Finally, if you want to stop this bill, visit the ECA's Action Page to send your elected representatives a letter strongly expressing you opposition to CISPA.

Ultimately this is a setback for opponents of CISPA, but that doesn't necessarily mean that the this bill will make it to law. In order for it to pass it has to make it through the Senate, and then the President has to sign it into law. The White House has already promised to veto CISPA. Let's see if they keep their word.

Source: Boing Boing, Gizmodo



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It is odd that this didn't get the uproar that SOPA and PIPA did. The internet did such a good job at mobilizing people before, but i suppose congress can just crank out law after law like that, especially if they have bipartisan support.

Travel difficulties meant i couldn't vote in the democratic primary against my senator who was in support of PIPA, I don't doubt where he'll side on this

New Smash, New Mains

"Also breakfast is an important part of a nutritious breakfast"

http://thebestpageintheuniverse.net/c.cgi?u=pass_sopa

We all know it's only a matter of time before a full fledged e-police anyways.



"Wer mit Ungeheuern kämpft, mag zusehn, dass er nicht dabei zum Ungeheuer wird. Und wenn du lange in einen Abgrund blickst, blickt der Abgrund auch in dich hinein."

- Friedrich Nietzsche

I don't pay an Internet service for you to hurt my feelings.

- Me


 

 

 

 

SamuelRSmith said:
http://thebestpageintheuniverse.net/c.cgi?u=pass_sopa

Wow. I haven't read Maddox in a long, long, loooong time. Wasn't even aware that he was still around. Apparently he can be quite cogent when he's not relying on shock humor.



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This porposal has a much smaller potential imapact, hence the lack of outrage.
Plus, the votes do not appear to be there to override a veto. Also, the amendment probably gets cut if it does pass the Senate. And in finally, many. Law has been adopted at all levels of government for good, bad, and ugly reasons that have been overturned on constitutional grounds by the courts.

Essentially people want security, they want to stop profiteering pirates, and they want to be able to post on You Tube. Until the third item is challenged, the laws to work on the first two will not be challenged -- regardless if they are good, bad, or ugly.

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Positive amendments have been made to the Bill

- Removed power grabs from Homeland Security.
- Added an automatic expiration after 5 years.

Mr Khan said:
It is odd that this didn't get the uproar that SOPA and PIPA did. The internet did such a good job at mobilizing people before, but i suppose congress can just crank out law after law like that, especially if they have bipartisan support.

Travel difficulties meant i couldn't vote in the democratic primary against my senator who was in support of PIPA, I don't doubt where he'll side on this <_>


I'd attribute most of it to the fact that large companies like Wikimedia, Google, Facebook, and Microsoft were against SOPA. Most companies are fine with CISPA, even Darrell Issa voted to pass it >:3 

The SOPA/PIPA protest would have been nothing without the backing of Google and Wikimedia. 



TadpoleJackson said:
Mr Khan said:
It is odd that this didn't get the uproar that SOPA and PIPA did. The internet did such a good job at mobilizing people before, but i suppose congress can just crank out law after law like that, especially if they have bipartisan support.

Travel difficulties meant i couldn't vote in the democratic primary against my senator who was in support of PIPA, I don't doubt where he'll side on this <_>


I'd attribute most of it to the fact that large companies like Wikimedia, Google, Facebook, and Microsoft were against SOPA. Most companies are fine with CISPA, even Darrell Issa voted to pass it >:3 

The SOPA/PIPA protest would have been nothing without the backing of Google and Wikimedia. 


I may be wrong about this, but I think tech companies were opposed to SOPA/PIPA because it required them to police information theirselves, which would be dramatically expensive. I don't think this is part of CISPA, so they ain't complaining.

Like I said, I may be wrong.



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SamuelRSmith said:

I may be wrong about this, but I think tech companies were opposed to SOPA/PIPA because it required them to police information theirselves, which would be dramatically expensive. I don't think this is part of CISPA, so they ain't complaining.

Like I said, I may be wrong.


I honestly don't know. I didn't pay that much attention to either bill. I figure they will keep putting these forward till they pass. It's kind of like, the French fighting a group of girl scouts. Eventually the girl scouts will win and the French will be disheartened 



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