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Bonus points for me: Is Machina an Awesome mod?

Hell Yes!
Yes
Most assuradely
Other option that is better than these options!!!
I want to have his babies.
spurgeonryan said:
theARTIST0017 said:
bobgamez said:
I wonder if nintendo will include a wiimote with the Wii U :/


No. They won't. That will just add more to the confusion they created last E3.

And Wii U is not a Wii. Wii accessories will need to be purchased seperately.


It is not a wii, but i still think the main control other than the tablet will be the motion controller. They are so cheap to make that it should be included. Still, my main for of control on the Wii has been the classic controller. I see the same thing happening when the Wii U comes out except for certain games. Hopefully even games that I do use the classic controllers with will still make me use the tablet as well. Just not sure how.

I do agree with one thing, the Wii U may be confusing for consumers.

Main  ≠ Multiple. What I mean by this is that there will only be one main controller for the Wii U. It doesn't make sense for there to be two main controllers that's only convenient for more confusion. And that is the Wii U tablet. 

Wait? Are you saying your main for the Wii U will be the Classic controller?



NINTENDO  +  DISNEY

I AM WARRIOR OF LIGHT #17 DON'T MESS WITH ME!

nintendo forever . . .

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theARTIST0017 said:
spurgeonryan said:
theARTIST0017 said:
bobgamez said:
I wonder if nintendo will include a wiimote with the Wii U :/


No. They won't. That will just add more to the confusion they created last E3.

And Wii U is not a Wii. Wii accessories will need to be purchased seperately.


It is not a wii, but i still think the main control other than the tablet will be the motion controller. They are so cheap to make that it should be included. Still, my main for of control on the Wii has been the classic controller. I see the same thing happening when the Wii U comes out except for certain games. Hopefully even games that I do use the classic controllers with will still make me use the tablet as well. Just not sure how.

I do agree with one thing, the Wii U may be confusing for consumers.

Main  ≠ Multiple. What I mean by this is that there will only be one main controller for the Wii U. It doesn't make sense for there to be two main controllers that's only convenient for more confusion. And that is the Wii U tablet. 

Wait? Are you saying your main for the Wii U will be the Classic controller?

I like to be able to play games like I have always played games. New ways are fine, especially if the game is done right. But I do not know if I will want to use the tablet or even the motion controller all the time. When I can I use the classic controller. Games like Wii sports resort and Skyward Sword have been loads of fun with motion control, but for some games I have got to use classic. The Conduit totally was not my thing for that reason alone.

I hope that the can get the tablet to work well.



theARTIST0017 said:
UncleScrooge said:
theARTIST0017 said:
bobgamez said:
I wonder if nintendo will include a wiimote with the Wii U :/


No. They won't. That will just add more to the confusion they created last E3.

And Wii U is not a Wii. Wii accessories will need to be purchased seperately.


Of course they will! They even showcased the multiplayer demoes by using Wii remotes. And the Wii remote is an "official" Wii U controller. Remember they planned to have just one tablet. 

No. They won't. A demo is a demo and nothing more. Demo ≠ Confirmation. The Wii Remote ≠ Official Wii U controller. That just happened to work out smoothly because the Wii U is backwards compatible with Wii anyways, Nintendo never planned that. In fact Nintendo themselves are not even sure how many tablets will work with with Wii you as Miyamoto they were working on getting two to work. Please, never assume.

Well, let's wait and see then. What I read in Iwata asks interviews sounded very different, though. The processing power just isn't there to support 4 tablets at once and going back to 2 players per system is a no-go. Also Aonuma said they will use motion controls for the next Zelda game. Of course the question was "will they include one in the package?" I think it would be dumb not to for they would lose a lot of customers. But we'll see. You could be right. 



UncleScrooge said:

Well, let's wait and see then. What I read in Iwata asks interviews sounded very different, though. The processing power just isn't there to support 4 tablets at once and going back to 2 players per system is a no-go. Also Aonuma said they will use motion controls for the next Zelda game. Of course the question was "will they include one in the package?" I think it would be dumb not to for they would lose a lot of customers. But we'll see. You could be right. 



I think it should be mandatory thatthey have the ability to allow for tablets, but these days I do not think they need to. Now if it is billed as a casual system again like the wii was then t will need to allow four tablets. But do that many people play multiplayer in the same room anymore? If they do is it more than two people at a time? There are a few games where the more you have the merrier! But even on a big Tv 4 screens starts to get a bit annoying. As long as Nintendo has good Internet two controllers should not be too big of deal. I think if they can allow two tablets and two motion control or even four motion control then that would he a viable option as well.



why the heavens do poeple post patcher's predictions!? isn't there any better analyst in this world!?

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@ Dark_gh0st_b0y

I would post others if other analyst would so any sort of work. But it seems that pachter is the only one who either works or the only one who gets enough attention to find it on the internet.

 

 

Time for the news!

 

PokéPark 2: Wonders BeyondWii

Adventure - Explore an expansive playground filled with adventure, attractions and Pok...

Feb 27, 2012
6.5
Okay
NRreader average

SSXX360

Sports - Redefining the franchise, SSX lets players join a team who seek to be the firs...

Feb 24, 2012 EDITORS' CHOICE
9.0
Amazing
NRreader average

Plants vs. ZombiesVita

Strategy - You'll need to think fast and plant faster to fend off this mob of helmet-clad...

Feb 24, 2012 EDITORS' CHOICE
9.0
Amazing
NRreader average

SSXPS3

Sports - Redefining the franchise, SSX lets players join a team who seek to be the firs...

Feb 24, 2012 EDITORS' CHOICE
9.0
Amazing
8.0reader average

Metal Gear Solid 3D Snake Eater3DS

Action - From the critically acclaimed director, Hideo Kojima, a new 3D experience re-i...

Feb 24, 2012 EDITORS' CHOICE
8.5
Great
9.4reader average

Hustle KingsVita

Sports

Also on: PS3
Feb 23, 2012
7.0
Good
NRreader average

The Last StoryWii

RPG - Take charge of a band of mercenaries and journey with them into an epic and ci...

Feb 23, 2012 EDITORS' CHOICE
8.5
Great
NRreader average

Virtua Tennis 4: World Tour EditionVita

Sports

Also on: PS3: 7.0
Feb 22, 2012
7.5
Good
NRreader average

Beat Sneak BanditiPhone

Music Action - When all the clocks in the world are stolen by Duke Clockface and the world is...

Feb 22, 2012 EDITORS' CHOICE
9.0
Amazing
NRreader average

Dillon's Rolling Western3DS

Adventure - Dillon's Rolling Western is a 3D tower defense game that blends action and str...

Feb 22, 2012
8.0
Great
NRreader average
       

Lots of good Nintendo games just coming out! Even Pokepark 2's 6.5 is pretty good. Dillons keeps pushing out those review scores as well!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sheik art from the Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time

Sheik art from the Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time

 

 

I think I will leave this post with this review. I am very excited for how well this game does!

 

Mario Party 9 review

Mario Party is back on form on Wii
Mario Party 9 review It's odd. We always wanted this to happen but if we're honest, we never really thought it would. And yet, with the ninth game in the 13-year series Mario Party has finally had the firm kick up the backside it has so badly needed since the GameCube days.

With Hudson booted off the series and Nd Cube - the team responsible for the surprisingly fun Wii Party - in their place, Mario Party 9 has a different feel to previous games in the series, particularly in the way the main game is played.



Rather than simply going around the board for a set number of turns and then seeing who has the most coins by the end, Mario Party 9's boards aren't really boards at all, they're linear maps and stages that you travel along from start to finish. Anyone who played the Board Game Island mode in Wii Party will be familiar with the concept, but Mario Party 9 fleshes it out into a full game.

Driving Princess Daisy
The way in which players move around the level has also been changed. Rather than everyone rolling their own dice and going their own way, all four players now travel around the map together in a vehicle, taking turns to be the 'captain' and to roll the dice.

While you're captain, anything the vehicle lands on - Mini Stars, Bowser squares, special Toad houses - only happens to you, so even though you're travelling around together, everyone will still be looking out for themselves and making sure they're in control when the vehicle lands on a good spot.

The large increase in the frequency of special dice items isn't a coincidence, as travelling around the board is much more tactical now. If an opponent has stopped the car right in front of a bunch of hazards and it's your turn, you'll want to have the special dice that only rolls a 0 or a 1 to try to get a 0 and pass the danger onto the next player.

The other main reason for the addition of vehicles is that the overall aim has changed a little. While you still have to be the player with the most stars at the end, they're not the rarities they were in previous games. This time you're collecting Mini Stars, which are dotted all over the place.

Not only does winning mini-games earn you Mini Stars (there are no coins in Mario Party 9), there are also loads all around the map which are collected by the captain as your vehicle passes through them.

This adds a great level of tension to proceedings, because these Mini Stars on the board can be pretty important in the final standings. Since it's a linear board, if you're not in control of the vehicle as you pass by them they'll go to an opponent.

Any ardent Mario Party fans reading this will probably be starting to get a little worried. After all, the Mario Party games have a large following and breaking a 13-year tradition could potentially rock a boat that, while not the most exciting vessel in the world, was stable enough for those who enjoyed sailing in it.

Get On Board
With Mario Party 9 you can kiss goodbye to epic, 50-turn matches and the chaos of every player being located at different parts of the board. That might disappoint some long-term fans of the series, but these changes are definitely a good thing. Each stage still takes a while to beat (between 45 and 90 minutes depending on which one you've chosen) and since you're usually going forwards you actually feel like you're making progress through each stage rather than just going through the motions until the number of turns runs out.

The fact that the ever-evil Bowser squares only appear near the end of the stage also throws some excitement into the final moments and makes for some very tense dice throws, as the sight of the leader landing on one and losing half their Mini Stars becomes a scarily frequent occurrence.

Finally, each stage has two boss battles (at the halfway and end points) which encourage both teamwork and greed at the same time. While the ultimate aim is for all four players to wear down the boss's energy bar, points are given for both overall performance and the final hit, meaning that players will still be trying to do a better job than everyone else with the promise of more Mini Stars as a reward.

Game For A Laugh
Of course, one thing that hasn't been dropped from the series is the wide variety of mini-games on offer. While it's a mixed bag as ever - which is to be expected when you've got a generous total of 78 mini-games in there - the good ones far outweigh the bad and there's a great variety of game styles on offer. You've got the button bashers like Launch Break, which sees you battering the 1 button, then the 2 button, then shaking the Remote to launch a Super Mario Bros. 2-style rocket as high as possible. There are racers like Speeding Bullets which has you riding a Bullet Bill like a harder-to-control Mario Kart, and reaction-based challenges such as Growing Up, which asks you to press a series of buttons before anyone else to make your beanstalk grow higher.

There are still mini-games based entirely on luck, however - Mecha Choice has your characters being chased by Mechakoopas and choosing doors to escape from them, some of which lead to dead ends. There are even a few Mario-style platforming mini-games in there, like the icy Polar Extremes and the rotating block madness of Skyjinks, which is a nice surprise for fans of more traditional Mario games.

Of course, with so many mini-games included, some of them will rub you up the wrong way. For example one springboard mini-game, which sees all four of you trying to reach the top of a series of platforms, suffers badly from control issues and odd physics which tend to frustrate.

This all comes down to personal taste, though. Ultimately part of the fun is learning which games your opponents aren't so great at and choosing them when you're in control to get an advantage.

Aside from the main game (which can either be played with up to four players or as a single-player Story mode, in which you play through each board while trying to beat some of Bowser's minions), there are also some extra modes that ditch the board and focus on mini-games instead.

Party On
Even these keep things fun, though, and they are more than just arbitrary add-ons. Step It Up sees you climbing a large staircase every time you win a game, whereas Garden Battle adds some strategy by letting the winner of each game choose a bunch of plants to place in their garden, with the ultimate aim of filling it completely before your rivals.

Then there are the extra games that last a little longer than the other mini-games on offer; Goomba Bowling is exactly what you'd expect and an interesting Perspective mode enables you to play some of the other mini-games from a third-person viewpoint. There are also unlockable vehicles and boards and the addictive Time Trial mode to round out the package.



After Mario Party 8 left us underwhelmed and Wii Party freshened things up, it could have been the end of Mario Party. This is a massive comeback though, despite a few niggles - a Classic mode would have been nice for old-school devotees, and the lack of online multiplayer is disappointing.

Ultimately, Mario Party 9 is a great success for Nd Cube, which has breathed new life into a flatlining series.
With many lessons having been learned, this is a wonderfully refreshing revamp. 86%


Around the world in 80 video games (part 1)

Heroes journey to amazing alien worlds and parallel dimensions all the time, but some of the most extraordinary locations in the galaxy are right here on planet Earth.

Join my epic, eight-part adventure as I travel to 80 landmarks and touristic attractions from all over the big, blue marble as seen in retro video games.


Street Fighter: Ryu and Lee square off on top of the Great Wall of China.


Castlevania: Bloodlines: John Morris takes a dip in a bloody fountain near the Palace of Versailles, France.


Super Dodge Ball: Team USA faces tough competition at Vatnajökull, Iceland. Cold crowd.


Cruis'n World: A red Toyota Supra drifts way too close to a pyramid in the ancient city of Chichen Itza, Mexico.


Double Dragon 3: The Sacred Stones: The Lee brothers spar against a couple of fools at Giza Necropolis, Egypt.


World Heroes: When you're done staring at the cute, Japanese monkeys you might notice the gigantic Mount Fuji in the background.


Superman: Metropolis is NOT New York. Yeah, and that's not the Statue of Liberty....


Aero Fighters 2: Hien saves Sydney's Opera House from aliens. Australia is safe, for now....


Killer Instinct 2: Tusk and Jago battle to the death at the mysterious Stonehenge in Wiltshire, England.


Gradius III: While technically not Earth, huge, stone heads like these cover part of the land around the Rano Raraku region of Easter Island. Mystery solved.

 

 

 

 

Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai opening


 

Retro time!

Spidey goes pink in The Revenge of Shinobi

Posted Sat, 08 Aug 2009 | 13:00 BST by Darren Calvert

We love your new look Spidey!

We love your new look Spidey!

Peter Parker might have something to say about this.

Hardcore SEGA fans will no doubt be aware that Revenge of Shinobi on the Mega Drive / Genesis had a few incarnations during its lifetime due to copyright issues. It’s a proud person who still owns the original Mega Drive cart which features boss characters such as The Hulk, The Terminator, Spider-Man, Batman and even Godzilla!

Two further versions of the game were released in subsequent months to avoid any nasty copyright issues, but Spider-Man remained intact as the level 6 boss as SEGA were able to officially license the famous Marvel superhero, with a credit even appearing on the title screen. The full lowdown on these changes can be found over at Hardcore Gaming 101.

Fast forward to 2009 and we were curious to find out what has become of the Spider-Man boss in the Virtual Console release of Revenge of Shinobi. Predictably Spidey is no more and is now replaced by a pink web-slinger instead, and Batman is still the mutated form that we found in the later versions of the Mega Drive cart.

Check out these badly aligned snaps taken from a webbed camera in the corner of the room while we battled through this epic boss fight.

Untitled
Nah Nah, you missed me pink spidey!

Untitled
Your webs are no match for the mighty Ninjutsu of Ikazuchi

Untitled
You're nearly finished!

Untitled
What! Now you are Batman? Seriously?!!

Untitled
So YOU go pink too!

Despite these amusing cosmetic changes Revenge of Shinobi is still an excellent buy on the Virtual Console. Check out our Revenge of Shinobi review if you need any further persuasion.

 

[via http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/shinobi/shinobi.htm" rel="external" href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/shinobi/shinobi.htm" target="_blank">hardcoregaming101.net, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Revenge_of_Shinobi#Versions" rel="external" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Revenge_of_Shinobi#Versions" target="_blank">en.wikipedia.org]

 

 

 

 

Nintendo rep: Fan passion not the only factor in localizing Wii RPGs

February 28th, 2012 

It can’t be denied that Operation Rainfall played a huge part in the North American localization of Xenoblade Chronicles and The Last Story. The group managed to stir up interest among a considerable amount of hardcore Wii owners, and led organized efforts in garnering Nintendo’s attention.

However, a Nintendo representative says that Operation Rainfall wasn’t the only factor that motivated the company to bring the much-requested titles to North America:

“Our fans are very passionate, and have demonstrated an interest in this game. We certainly appreciate this passion, but it alone did not impact our decision to launch the game or the timeframe in which it would launch.”

Ryan Tyner, one of Operation Rainfall’s leaders, believes Nintendo might be downplaying their involvement:

“The fact that they revealed [Xenoblade Chronicles] on Facebook is telling, considering that is where the campaign asked for the game. There are other little ‘signs’ such as [NOA President Reggie Fils-Aime] stating in the The Last Story reveal that many people had been ‘clamoring’ for the game. Privately, we had inside sources that confirmed that Nintendo was taking notice of us and that it was indeed because of our efforts that these games were being released…”

Tyner also discussed how Nintendo of Europe’s translation most likely made Nintendo’s decisions easier:

“Really, it was just a matter of the circumstances being ideal for our campaign. I think we showed them that if they did bring the games over, people would buy them. But of course there is also the fact that our member participation has been great, and that the staff has worked hard to make this happen. I work harder on Operation Rainfall some days than I do on my actual job.”

Source

 

 

 

 

First Teaser Trailer For Pokemon Black & White 2




I can't wait for Pokémon Black 2 and White 2! I am playing White at this very moment. ^^

I decline your decline.


@Toxicspikes

Is this your second time through White? About how many hours have you put into it so far?

 

 

Will edit in a bit, just got some crazy news.

See I came back. Too much news, too little space...and time.

 

Metal Gear Solid: Snake Eater 3D

Not for honor, but for 3DS

Every so often a game comes along that makes you appreciate just how clever it is, a feat that creator Hideo Kojima pulls off every time he steps up to direct an entry in his Metal Gear Solid series. From fourth-wall-shattering boss battles to hiding key information in plain sight, they tend to raise the question of why don’t more games sit down and have a good think about what they do and why they do it.

Metal Gear Solid: Snake Eater 3D carries that line of thought in its adaptation from PlayStation 2 to 3DS, not by merely adding stereoscopic visuals and calling it a day but by taking a good, long look at where other developers have faltered in the process and doing one better. A faithful but possibly not the definitive version of a stone-cold console classic, Snake Eater is one of the best uses of Nintendo’s young handheld hardware to date.

As the chronological starting point of Metal Gear’s often convoluted timeline, Snake Eater marks a great entry point for the series as it requires no prior knowledge, establishing many of the characters, themes and technology that pop up down the line. Taking many cues from Cold War-themed spy movies like the James Bond flicks, Snake Eater’s story is filled with questions of morality and loyalty, betrayal and duplicity as it tells of how a CIA operative goes from codename Naked Snake to Big Boss.

Coming off the post-modern insanity of Metal Gear Solid 2, Snake Eater’s story is pared back in comparison and, while still full of twists, turns and elements of the supernatural, comes off a bit more straightforward – it does, after all, have the privilege of a fresh start, and the Cold War setting befits the cloak and dagger twists. There's certainly no need to know anything about Metal Gear to enjoy the plot, although those familiar with the overarching story will get a kick out of seeing young versions of key characters.

The Cobra Unit that makes up the rogues gallery has, on the whole, arguably the most memorable foes that any Snake has come up against, with tense fights and multiple ways to tackle each. One Cobra confrontation involves no combat at all, and another Cobra can be taken out hours beforehand in a separate location to avoid the battle altogether. Each encounter could easily stand as the individual highlight of separate games, so to have them all in one is a true accomplishment.

Challenging series convention, Snake Eater mostly trades tight military corridors for a jungle filled with wild animals and foliage and opens the game up for camouflage. An index based on how you are equipped and positioned tells you how visible Snake is, affecting the risk of being spotted by enemies. Certain camos work better in particular areas, and for maximum sneaky you’ll want to cycle through your options whenever you enter a new area. On PS2 this meant a lot of fiddling with menus, but thanks to the touch screen this is considerably easier, as is applying medical treatments and switching weapons. New for 3DS is the ability to create your own camo from photos – a novel proposal but not always the most useful.

While realistically your path through the jungle isn’t as extensive and open as it may suggest, there is something to be said for being able to swim, climb trees, hide in tall grass and look up at the sky. Snake Eater takes full advantage of its outdoor environments, especially with the 3D screen volume cranked up. In fact, Snake Eater makes gorgeous and deliberate use of stereoscopic 3D, providing a sense of place and atmosphere that the technology has always strived for but seldom reached. Pop in some headphones and the jungle becomes almost a living place. The world feels refreshed with the extra dimension, a sensation seemingly not lost on Konami as the huge number of cinematics are tweaked to best use the new space — everything is very aware of its perspective, playfully so at times.

In addition to being very pretty, 3D is technically well implemented to boot. Not once will a gimmicky “in-your-face” object stick too far out of the screen and cause double-vision. Objects feel very rounded, as if they inhabit an actual space, as opposed to looking like cutouts in the fore- and background. A minor but extremely convenient touch occurs when the limited gyro controls come in to play, almost invisibly flattening out the 3D effect for when you're expected to move the handheld only to slowly flesh out the environment when you're clear. It's such an obviously brilliant solution to an annoying, seemingly inevitable problem that we're surprised it's taken someone so long to figure it out in this basic way.

Less than stellar is the frame rate; while the visuals are on par and sometimes improved over the PS2 original, the average frame rate has more stutter than we would like and busy sequences take a much more noticeable hit. It's never unplayable, but it keeps Snake Eater from making the most of itself.

Purists may scoff at the idea of playing Snake Eater with only one Circle Pad, and for them the Circle Pad Pro offers a more traditional take. In truth, the game controls just as well without the accessory, using the same scheme as the one-nubbed Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker on PSP. It takes a few moments to get accustomed to the new layout (or no time at all if you’re down with Peace Walker), and once you do it’s hardly noticeable.

Those who do plump for the Circle Pad Pro will find the second analogue input and shoulder buttons to be welcome additions; camera control is noticeably easier with the extra slider, and having access to two extra shoulder buttons makes close-quarters combat and gunfire more satisfying, Double analogue addicts will find it a nice facsimile of traditional controllers; those accustomed to making do with one will manage fine without Circle Pad Pro.

As evidenced by its copious amounts of cinematics and general runtime they can span, Snake Eater is noticeably handheld-hostile. It’s not the kind of game you can always pop in for, say, your morning commute and reliably spend half an hour in the jungle sneaking around – unless you know they’re coming based on repeat play, you play a Russian Roulette of extended codec conversations and cinematics that could go on for days. And considering how pretty the 3D effect is at full blast, the most reliable way to play Snake Eater 3D is plunked next to an outlet, doubly so if you opt to use the Circle Pad Pro.

 

Conclusion

Metal Gear Solid: Snake Eater 3D may not be the definitive version of Snake’s Cold War escapades but that doesn’t stop it from being a clever, well thought-out and simply great game — frame rate hiccups aside, the impressive and intelligent use of stereoscopic 3D makes the game an absolute joy to look at as well. It's not often that games as dense and exciting as Snake Eater see the light of day on any platform, which makes the 3DS version all the more worthwhile whether it's your first romp through the jungle or just to see an old friend in a new perspective.

 

 

9/10

 

 

 

Witness the Gloriously Annoying Marriage of Ocarina of Time and My Little Pony

How could The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time's Navi possibly get any more annoying? Don't ask questions like that unless you want answers — pony answers.

It never ceases to amaze me how well the mouth movements in My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic lend themselves to other things. Things like StarCraft II, and now, The Legend of Zelda.

It's not too much of a stretch, really. Pinkie Pie, the bubbly, borderline insane party pony from Ponyville is pretty much Navi after about 20 cups of espresso as it is. And hey, Applejack wears a hat. Link wears a hat. Same difference.

And thus I have fulfilled my secret brony pact.

The Legend of Pony: Navi Pie [YouTube via Kris Liman's Twitter]



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I've put about 75 hours into Black and 35 into White. I borrowed my brother's copy.

That png of Pokemon generations is great. I'm saving it.

I made a bet with JoeTheBro on February 19, 2014. I say the 3DS will outsell the PS4 at least one month in 2014, he says the 3DS won't. Whoever is right gets to control the other person's sig for a month.

Check out Ohga Shrugs!

Love and tolerate.