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The wii might have a problem

Forums - Nintendo Discussion - The wii might have a problem

fkusumot said:
naznatips said:
Just to warn you, because you went with an LCD instead of a Plasma you are going to experience jaggies in your Wii games (even with component cables). I've noticed a major difference when playing my Wii on an LCD and Plasma in the amount of jaggies there are. The Wii arguably looks worse with component cables on a Plasma than with composite, but on an LCD it's gorgeous.

Did you get that mixed up or did you mean that you should use composite cables when you have a plasma? I have a plasma so I'm not concerned about how it looks on LCD.


Mixed up haha.

I'm not sure why the difference between jaggies on an LCD and Plasma is so big for the Wii, but the Plasmas I've run my Wii on (including my own) look much better than the LCDs I run it on. Much less aliasing and better color. The only real issues with Plasmas is they burn a lot more power than LCDs. Screen burn-in is a myth. You would have to leavea a modern Plasma on with a static image for more than a week for burn-in, and the half-life of modern plasmas is 60,000 hours +, so they should last most people at least 10 years.

And that's fine NJ5... you can use component cables and set it to 480i.  Just telling you that 480p on LCDs for the Wii is not pleasant in my experience.   



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@Naz,

60k hours is like 6.8 years of constant use so I would bet it last 10 years at the minimum.



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Sqrl said:
@Naz,

60k hours is like 6.8 years of constant use so I would bet it last 10 years at the minimum.

Right.  That's why I said at least 10 years.  It's possible there are people on here who have no job and live with their parents and play games on their Plasma for 16 hours a day.  I'm just trying to be fair to everyone.




naznatips said:

The only real issues with Plasmas is they burn a lot more power than LCDs. Screen burn-in is a myth. You would have to leavea a modern Plasma on with a static image for more than a week for burn-in, and the half-life of modern plasmas is 60,000 hours +, so they should last most people at least 10 years.

I wouldn't call it a myth.

Watching a majority of boxed content stuff - either 2.35:1, 4:3 or both - is very likely to quickly cause "burn in". So much so, that most recent plasma TVs use very bright and annoying (IMO) grey bars instead of black on 4:3 content (which is the majority of programing accessible in many parts of the world). And on 2.35:1 content, the bars usually come with the package and they'll be black, so you either zoom (which might not be an option with subtitles), or tough luck. Some badly done TV channel logos will also burn in pretty quickly, as will sports statistics and stuff (which a lot of people want an HDTV for).

A lot of this is recoverable with time (and screen savers), but permanent burn in is still a problem in my experience. At work, we got permanent burn in on 20 plasma screens we used for less than a week in an interactive marketing application on a shopping mall. Yes, that would never have happened on normal content, but I'm sure a Wii, even with display dimming, if left on for a few hours on the main menu, would cause at least temporary damage on most plasmas in the market today. And watching 80%+ of 2.35:1 and 4:3 content with black bars and pillars would certainly cause permanent visible damage in less than a year on all but the most expensive plasmas I know, that's for sure. For me, that's unacceptable. I maybe careful, but I do want to watch movies and regular TV on their native formats without constant worry for the health of my €1000+ purchase.



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KruzeS said:
naznatips said:

The only real issues with Plasmas is they burn a lot more power than LCDs. Screen burn-in is a myth. You would have to leavea a modern Plasma on with a static image for more than a week for burn-in, and the half-life of modern plasmas is 60,000 hours +, so they should last most people at least 10 years.

I wouldn't call it a myth.

Watching a majority of boxed content stuff - either 2.35:1, 4:3 or both - is very likely to quickly cause "burn in". So much so, that most recent plasma TVs use very bright and annoying (IMO) grey bars instead of black on 4:3 content (which is the majority of programing accessible in many parts of the world). And on 2.35:1 content, the bars usually come with the package and they'll be black, so you either zoom (which might not be an option with subtitles), or tough luck. Some badly done TV channel logos will also burn in pretty quickly, as will sports statistics and stuff (which a lot of people want an HDTV for).

A lot of this is recoverable with time (and screen savers), but permanent burn in is still a problem in my experience. At work, we got permanent burn in on 20 plasma screens we used for less than a week in an interactive marketing application on a shopping mall. Yes, that would never have happened on normal content, but I'm sure a Wii, even with display dimming, if left on for a few hours on the main menu, would cause at least temporary damage on most plasmas in the market today. And watching 80%+ of 2.35:1 and 4:3 content with black bars and pillars would certainly cause permanent visible damage in less than a year on all but the most expensive plasmas I know, that's for sure. For me, that's unacceptable. I maybe careful, but I do want to watch movies and regular TV on their native formats without constant worry for the health of my €1000+ purchase.


No, a few hours of the Wii being left on will cause no damage at all. On my Samsung 42" Plasma I left my Wii on overnight (on accident) and left in the morning for class without even noticing it in the other room. I got home at noon, and the TV had the Wii menu image on it for a total of 12 hours and there was no burn in at all. Not even temporary.

As far as the bars being "bright" grey, they are certainly grey instead of black, but they are hardly bright. I watch movies on my Plasma quite often and I would never notice that they are grey unless I turned the TV off from that screen (seeing the contrast between that and black). I'm not sure what type of Plasmas you used for your presentation, but even a medium quality Plasma shouldn't have experienced that issue. I'm not going to stress test my Plasma for days or anything but it's not affected by being left on for any reasonable amount of hours even with a static image like a pause menu.  It's very true that this was an issue with early Plasmas, but no recent plasmas of any decent quality will experience burn-in under reasonable circumstances.  



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bulletstopper said:
I had a solution to this guys problem but you all seem to have straightened him out within just a few posts. This seems to suggest that the internet can indeed be used for something other than porn!

Apparently, you haven't stumbled across Ultra-Porn yet!

Twitter: @d21lewis  --I'll add you if you add me!!

KruzeS said:
naznatips said:

The only real issues with Plasmas is they burn a lot more power than LCDs. Screen burn-in is a myth. You would have to leavea a modern Plasma on with a static image for more than a week for burn-in, and the half-life of modern plasmas is 60,000 hours +, so they should last most people at least 10 years.

I wouldn't call it a myth.

Watching a majority of boxed content stuff - either 2.35:1, 4:3 or both - is very likely to quickly cause "burn in". So much so, that most recent plasma TVs use very bright and annoying (IMO) grey bars instead of black on 4:3 content (which is the majority of programing accessible in many parts of the world). And on 2.35:1 content, the bars usually come with the package and they'll be black, so you either zoom (which might not be an option with subtitles), or tough luck. Some badly done TV channel logos will also burn in pretty quickly, as will sports statistics and stuff (which a lot of people want an HDTV for).

A lot of this is recoverable with time (and screen savers), but permanent burn in is still a problem in my experience. At work, we got permanent burn in on 20 plasma screens we used for less than a week in an interactive marketing application on a shopping mall. Yes, that would never have happened on normal content, but I'm sure a Wii, even with display dimming, if left on for a few hours on the main menu, would cause at least temporary damage on most plasmas in the market today. And watching 80%+ of 2.35:1 and 4:3 content with black bars and pillars would certainly cause permanent visible damage in less than a year on all but the most expensive plasmas I know, that's for sure. For me, that's unacceptable. I maybe careful, but I do want to watch movies and regular TV on their native formats without constant worry for the health of my €1000+ purchase.


Erm...I have my Wii on almost the whole day (when I'm not on my PC) but nothing's happened to my Wii.


Exactly KruzeS, thats why i bought a DLP



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Sony LCD TV's have an option for 'Edge Enhancement'.

Turn that off for the Wii and it will reduce jaggies.



naznatips said:

No, a few hours of the Wii being left on will cause no damage at all. On my Samsung 42" Plasma I left my Wii on overnight (on accident) and left in the morning for class without even noticing it in the other room. I got home at noon, and the TV had the Wii menu image on it for a total of 12 hours and there was no burn in at all. Not even temporary.

As far as the bars being "bright" grey, they are certainly grey instead of black, but they are hardly bright. I watch movies on my Plasma quite often and I would never notice that they are grey unless I turned the TV off from that screen (seeing the contrast between that and black). I'm not sure what type of Plasmas you used for your presentation, but even a medium quality Plasma shouldn't have experienced that issue. I'm not going to stress test my Plasma for days or anything but it's not affected by being left on for any reasonable amount of hours even with a static image like a pause menu.  It's very true that this was an issue with early Plasmas, but no recent plasmas of any decent quality will experience burn-in under reasonable circumstances.  

Samsung has some of the best TVs in the market. I don't mean anything by that beyond the fact that you were smart in your purchase, and that your TV is definitely above average, even if you payed bellow average. But believe me, most other plasmas (and flat screen TVs in general) don't behave nearly as well as the Samsung ones.

As to the gray bars, I was talking about 4:3 content not movies - don't know if you usually watch that. LG plasmas (for example) put horribly bright gray bars/pillars on 4:3 content. And by horribly bright, I mean 50% gray, and no way of mistaking it for black. Yes, you can turn that feature off, but you'll get permanent damage in months if what you do the most is watch 4:3 content (as I do). On movies, 2.35:1 bars are not usually introduced by the TV, so they'll usually be true black, as black as the TV can do (which is definitely a problem for some plasmas, if all you do is watch 2.35:1 movies).

In my experience, burn in is still a problem that can't simply be dismissed with "no good plasma will burn in on reasonable conditions". Leaving your Wii on for a week isn't reasonable, but watching a majority of 4:3 and 2.35:1 content is. And it's something that people buying plasmas should be aware of, specially given that the problem is most acute on the first 100 or so hours of the TV's life.

OTOH, my experience with fixed pixel displays (plasmas and LCDs) tells me there's really no much difference on jaggies, except maybe that plasmas consistently have less horizontal pixels than LCDs, so maybe they'll display anamorphic content a "Wii bit" better. It's got much more to do with the quality of image processing than anything else. There's always that argument that 1080p is worse for SD content than 720p because the scaler has to fill even more pixels, and quite honestly IMO that's only ever a problem if your 1080p TV scaler sucks more than a 720p TV scaler (which it shouldn't).

So, really, YMMV - and all that matters is that you're happy with your own TV.



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