Quantcast
What people blaming Geohotz and the "hackers" seem to be missing...

Forums - Sony Discussion - What people blaming Geohotz and the "hackers" seem to be missing...

imaprettyhotguy said:

Assumption is assumption stop basing things on assumptions 


Sony is posting assumptiong now? Seems strange. The personal data table was unencrypted, and thats where the passwords were stored. That isn't an assumption. Thats fact.



Starcraft 2 ID: Gnizmo 229

Around the Network
rocketpig said:
imaprettyhotguy said:
rocketpig said:
Grimes said:

Is it out of the realm of possibility that the hackers could have stolen the encryption keys?

If they took the encryption key, Sony wouldn't be saying the CC data should be safe. That would mean that the hacker(s) had full access to that particular database and could have jacked the card numbers without much effort.

Assuming they use the same key for CC as passwords, and the hacker never got into the part that holds CC (atleast there is no evidence)

Different database, different key.

Seriously, just stop.

That just proves my point about it being a different key... you are the one that should stop, take a step back and realize just how often you are wrong 



Gnizmo said:
imaprettyhotguy said:

Assumption is assumption stop basing things on assumptions 


Sony is posting assumptiong now? Seems strange. The personal data table was unencrypted, and thats where the passwords were stored. That isn't an assumption. Thats fact.

Yeah I'm done arguing with someone who thinks their assumptions are facts, I operate on assumptions sometimes too but I never pretend it's a fact and if the assumption is later proved incorrect I alter my views accordingly, in your case you'd probably just stop tallking and go hide somewhere until people forget 



imaprettyhotguy said:
rocketpig said:
imaprettyhotguy said:
Gnizmo said:
imaprettyhotguy said:

You said the word practically so likely you are just putting your own spin on the fact that they said their telling you to change your pass and you just assumed it's unencripted and there is nothing in it about them admiting they were unprotected and the worse PR is every article saying it's the worst breach of personal info in history when there were bigger ones which have already been linked in this thread and you already saw


The personal data table was entirely unencrypted, and thats where your password was stored. It is all there. Read the Q&A and you will see this. The passwords were unencrypted, and stolen. Thats why they are forcing everyone to reset their password. At this point the potential for liability would be too high if they didn't.

Assumption is assumption stop basing things on assumptions 

And stop talking about things you obviously do not understand.

If the passwords were encrypted (meaning they were in a different database), Sony would have said as much in the Q&A.

On top of that, creating a database specifically for passwords is an unwieldy and overly complicated solution to a problem that doesn't exist if you just encrypt that table.

You can store encrypted code on the same database as unencrypted text... you say I'm the one that doesn't understand what hes talking about lol

Now it's apparent you can't read. Sony admitted that ONE database was encrypted while the OTHER was NOT. That means there are two databases. One encrypted, one not. Either the passwords were in the CC database (encrypted) or the user database (unencrypted).

If I didn't know that you could store encrypted and unencrypted data in the same database, why did I type this:

"On top of that, creating a database specifically for passwords is an unwieldy and overly complicated solution to a problem that doesn't exist if you just encrypt that table."

You know what a table is, right?




Or check out my new webcomic: http://selfcentent.com/

imaprettyhotguy said:
rocketpig said:
imaprettyhotguy said:
rocketpig said:
Grimes said:

Is it out of the realm of possibility that the hackers could have stolen the encryption keys?

If they took the encryption key, Sony wouldn't be saying the CC data should be safe. That would mean that the hacker(s) had full access to that particular database and could have jacked the card numbers without much effort.

Assuming they use the same key for CC as passwords, and the hacker never got into the part that holds CC (atleast there is no evidence)

Different database, different key.

Seriously, just stop.

That just proves my point about it being a different key... you are the one that should stop, take a step back and realize just how often you are wrong 

I've logged hundreds (if not thousands) of hours in pure database work.

What's your resume look like?




Or check out my new webcomic: http://selfcentent.com/

Around the Network
rocketpig said:

I've logged hundreds of hours in database work.

What's your resume look like?


Probably a corporate shill for a marketing firm doing damage control, or a pathetic troll.  Either way is pretty sad.



imaprettyhotguy said:

Yeah I'm done arguing with someone who thinks their assumptions are facts, I operate on assumptions sometimes too but I never pretend it's a fact and if the assumption is later proved incorrect I alter my views accordingly, in your case you'd probably just stop tallking and go hide somewhere until people forget 


Better than arguing with someone who thinks statements from Sony aren't facts. I would take my own advice if I were you.



Starcraft 2 ID: Gnizmo 229

rocketpig said:
imaprettyhotguy said:
rocketpig said:
imaprettyhotguy said:
Gnizmo said:
imaprettyhotguy said:

You said the word practically so likely you are just putting your own spin on the fact that they said their telling you to change your pass and you just assumed it's unencripted and there is nothing in it about them admiting they were unprotected and the worse PR is every article saying it's the worst breach of personal info in history when there were bigger ones which have already been linked in this thread and you already saw


The personal data table was entirely unencrypted, and thats where your password was stored. It is all there. Read the Q&A and you will see this. The passwords were unencrypted, and stolen. Thats why they are forcing everyone to reset their password. At this point the potential for liability would be too high if they didn't.

Assumption is assumption stop basing things on assumptions 

And stop talking about things you obviously do not understand.

If the passwords were encrypted (meaning they were in a different database), Sony would have said as much in the Q&A.

On top of that, creating a database specifically for passwords is an unwieldy and overly complicated solution to a problem that doesn't exist if you just encrypt that table.

You can store encrypted code on the same database as unencrypted text... you say I'm the one that doesn't understand what hes talking about lol

Now it's apparent you can't read. Sony admitted that ONE database was encrypted while the OTHER was NOT. That means there are two databases. One encrypted, one not. Either the passwords were in the CC database (encrypted) or the user database (unencrypted).

If I didn't know that you could store encrypted and unencrypted data in the same database, why did I type this:

"On top of that, creating a database specifically for passwords is an unwieldy and overly complicated solution to a problem that doesn't exist if you just encrypt that table."

You know what a table is, right?

How the hell do you still not understand what I said wow, this is just getting so frustrating trying to make you understand simple concepts, the CC database was more secrue and it's possible passwords were the only thing encrypted on the personal one, how hard is that for you to understand 



rocketpig said:
imaprettyhotguy said:
rocketpig said:
imaprettyhotguy said:
rocketpig said:
Grimes said:

Is it out of the realm of possibility that the hackers could have stolen the encryption keys?

If they took the encryption key, Sony wouldn't be saying the CC data should be safe. That would mean that the hacker(s) had full access to that particular database and could have jacked the card numbers without much effort.

Assuming they use the same key for CC as passwords, and the hacker never got into the part that holds CC (atleast there is no evidence)

Different database, different key.

Seriously, just stop.

That just proves my point about it being a different key... you are the one that should stop, take a step back and realize just how often you are wrong 

I've logged hundreds (if not thousands) of hours in pure database work.

What's your resume look like?

So you worked for a few months then got fired for incompetence 



imaprettyhotguy said:
So you worked for a few months then got fired for incompetence 

Yep, that's why I have the title IT Manager, manage three networks, and am sitting at my work desk right now.

Funny though how you're calling me incompetent and none of my networks have ever been breached but you're defending Sony, whose network WAS breached.




Or check out my new webcomic: http://selfcentent.com/