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So, Fire Emblem Three Houses turned out exactly as I feared...

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Chrkeller said:
Quick question. My students are highly proficient in a variety of skills, but outside sword my main character has terrible skills. Is there a trick to quickly learning something like flying for the main character? Or is she purposely meant to be a ground swordmaster?

Faculty training is your ally, but you won't get any if you don't go explore and if your professor level is low.



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Chrkeller said:
setsunatenshi said:

I guess you need to focus heavily on the specific training you want and stick to it. I read somewhere that to cheese some xp into different skills you need to be playing on a lower difficulty, so retreating from battle keeps your xp. That's something you can't do in the top difficulty, so I suspect only on NG+ you'll be able to keep focusing on a different skill.

A nice thing it has is that the more you use certain skills, the better you are at them, but there's really no great way to become an all rounder without nerfing yourself into a corner.

Thanks for the information.  I will probably just keep moving forward as a Swordmaster.  It is working well.  

No problem at all. Trying not to spoil anything, but there's a point in the story that your MC will get some additional skills to use and make him a bit more rounded. They won't be flying and mounting skills though unfortunately.



Stellar_Fungk said:

The weight and attack speed irritates me and now theres diffirent shields so that means that all my units inventory during battle is full with iron, steel weapons and shields in case I need to adjust my AS to not get doubled or to be able to double. It makes the battle preparations very long for me and I need to change gear often during battle.

Is there a basic rule to this. What kind of units should use steel weapons and shields?

I read that shields are not wort it because it does prevent you from attacking twice on an enemy or allowing them to attack you twice. The rings are much better. Perhaps shields are good for tanks to bait the enemy. 

Steel is good until you get access to silver. I think everyone should at least have a steel and Iron weapon (except mages). Iron is good for attacking twice. While steel is good with combat arts since it gives you that high damage in 1 hit. 



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I'm curious what level your units are at if they're simply killing everything without retaliation. I'm nearing the end of the GD route on hard (or so my friends tell me), and while it's nowhere near the hardest strategy game I've played, there's definitely a degree to which I need to be careful in order to not get assblasted immediately (i.e. can't just charge in recklessly, can't place Lysithea in cavalry range, etc.). I've given some units both magic/physical skills but one or the other just ends up not being that great and not worth using. Bows also wind up being really bad on later maps without proper investment in my experience (unless it's just hoards of flying enemies).

As for the monastery, I'd honestly recommend skipping it if it bores you. It kinda got a bit samey to me late game, and unless you really need to improve your professor level or level up a weapon skill level for whatever reason, you can pretty much just rest/battle through everything with no consequences.

Overall I've liked it a lot so far. Certainly better than the Tellius games/Fates imo, potentially better than Awakening depending on whether it sticks the ending/whether there are any truly obnoxious maps in the endgame.



Chrkeller said:
Quick question. My students are highly proficient in a variety of skills, but outside sword my main character has terrible skills. Is there a trick to quickly learning something like flying for the main character? Or is she purposely meant to be a ground swordmaster?

Nearly all main characters in the Fire Emblem series specialize in swords, so it's not surprising that the default in this game is swords too. Talking to the knights of Seiros and other professors during monastery exploration allows the main character to train a variety of skills. You get 20 points per session, so five sessions in a category should move you from E to D which is usually the requirement to pass an exam. Once you've changed into a rider class, you automatically gain skill EXP for horse/pegasus for every action.

It should be doable within a month of monastery training sessions to access a mid-level class of your liking for your main character. That is, if you don't spend activity points on anything else.

Stellar_Fungk said:

The weight and attack speed irritates me and now theres diffirent shields so that means that all my units inventory during battle is full with iron, steel weapons and shields in case I need to adjust my AS to not get doubled or to be able to double. It makes the battle preparations very long for me and I need to change gear often during battle.

Is there a basic rule to this. What kind of units should use steel weapons and shields?

Shields should only be used by units who either have a very good speed stat or classes like knights and generals where you don't expect to hit twice and often get hit twice anyway. The fast units can commonly still attack twice despite a shield while knights/generals can become near invincible to physical attacks. I wouldn't bother with buying additional shields because they have weight as drawback, so other accessories you pick up eventually are just fine; they grant small bonuses without any drawbacks.

Since iron weapons have advantages in weight and accuracy (and price), they are kept throughout the entire game in the Fire Emblem series. You have six equipment slots in Three Houses, so the common setup for sword/lance/axe should be 1 iron weapon, 1 steel weapon, 1 weapon for distance, 1 accessory and 1 healing item. That leaves one slot for something else, be it a silver weapon or relic, or a key to open doors/chests. For bows you go 1 iron, 1 steel, 1 silver/relic/long bow, 1 accessory and 1 healing item. For gauntlets you need a different weapon category to add distance as an option. Weapons for magic users are hardly worth it because of their strength stat, so their inventory doesn't need more than 1 healing item and 1 accessory; you can use that inventory space for keys/healing items to trade with other characters if the need arises and the main character with their storage isn't anywhere close.

There's no real need to buy weapons because you'll get most stuff in time anyway. Ultimately, you'll have five equipment slots that won't change while one conditional slot is left. Use it if it makes sense, otherwise leave it empty. The only things that I'd say should be bought are a bunch of door and chest keys early on (five each should suffice) because you don't want to realize during the middle of a battle that you have no option to open the chests on the map.



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Lonely_Dolphin said:
HoangNhatAnh said:

Echoes? The only good FE story wise on 3ds?

I'm all about the gameplay!

Not for me, Nintendo games are mostly about gameplay only, but there is some exceptions like Earthbound, Golden Sun, Fire Emblem and Xenoblade. They need both good gameplay and good story, there is a reason why many people call Awakening generic and Fates is trash for otaku with fanservices only, despite not bad gamelay



Mar1217 said:
Chrkeller said:
Quick question. My students are highly proficient in a variety of skills, but outside sword my main character has terrible skills. Is there a trick to quickly learning something like flying for the main character? Or is she purposely meant to be a ground swordmaster?

Faculty training is your ally, but you won't get any if you don't go explore and if your professor level is low.

Currently I am a C+ professor level and I have done some faculty training, but it still seems limited.  Flying in particular seems difficult.  



Chrkeller said:
Mar1217 said:

Faculty training is your ally, but you won't get any if you don't go explore and if your professor level is low.

Currently I am a C+ professor level and I have done some faculty training, but it still seems limited.  Flying in particular seems difficult.  

Once you get to B/B+ you'll get generally more opportunity to do stuff to up the motivations of your students and activity points to invest in faculty training.

You don't have much choice otherwise you'll just have to stick to the Swordmaster class. Personally I want him to use the Hero class so I'm concentrating my efforts toward Axe skill.



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Well, I dont know about that, personally I feel its the best Fire Emblem since Awakening... And Fates, Sacred Sword, Radiant Dawn, and perhaps even Path or Radiance and Blazing Blade. I liked it tho.



My critique of modern Fire Emblem:

1. Lower access to characters - assuming you try to play classic mode if you lose a character, chances are close to certain you lose access to getting characters later. In the older games, from a gameplay perspective, you are usually good to lose a lot of characters because you get a sufficient number of new ones to replace the dead ones. This hasn't been the case in Awakening or Fates (not sure about Valentia, Echoes, or Houses as I haven't played those).

2. Games not balanced for classic mode - You may as well call it "no fun mode" - as I pointed out in my last point, if you lose a character, it's fairly devastating. But there are other reasons, there are a lot of "Got you!" type maps where it's not even a case of "I have to sacrifice a unit to win this battle," and more of a "SIX OF US SPAWNED BEHIND YOUR LINES AND WE'RE ATTACKING NOW AND KILLING YOUR HEALERS AND ARCHERS!" - I noticed this particularly in the Birthright game of Fates. This is fine if you are playing casual mode, but it's pretty much game over if playing classical mode. It adds a new dimension of memorizing enemy spawn patterns, which is not fun at all since they are not logical as they were in old games; and this is why I strongly feel they didn't try to balance or playtest much around classic mode.

3. The story focus is long gone. While there was clearly a decline in story quality (with the exception of maybe Path of Radiance which was one of the few games who had a better story than its more immediate predecessors) the games became much more generic feeling, the relationships felt more like placeholder text and less like a real relationship that you see developing. Additionally, the focus on narrative has been lowered significantly. The stories are less epic, less mature, and more "anime" for lack of a better term. But this is a reasonably general thing that has happened in strategy RPGs in general: Look at the stories and epic feeling of games like Fire Emblem Genealogy of the Holy War, Ogre Battle, Final Fantasy Tactics compared to Disgaea 5, Fire Emblem Awakening, and Final Fantasy Tactics Advance games; it's like when an R-rated film has a rated PG sequel. I don't want to sound like I am bashing those games, I LIKE those games, but they are not the same as the strategy RPGs of old.

4. Simplified gameplay - arguably a good thing, but not for me! I enjoyed the older games where you had to more carefully consider your moves, do a lot more calculating, and take a risk, while in newer Fire Emblem there are fewer variables to consider (except random spawning); but ultimately it makes victory taste less sweet. Not once since Awakening has come out do I get that "Holy hell I can't believe that worked!" feeling. And I'm not even talking about the elemental stuff, but rather how the game presents information to you.

5. No deaths = no meaning - in the past games, while from a gameplay perspective losing a character wouldn't screw you... it would be more like losing 12-20 characters that would. However, the sense of loss was immense, and it would change the story of the game. It added to the game's replayability; each experience was different than the last... As well in Blazing Blade, you could go through with the Hector perspective instead of Eliwood for a more rowdy point of view (and also a little more challenging), Sacred Stones allowed similar branching.; anyway! I digress. Fire Emblem Awakening is a game you might play once, or twice again to see what a harder difficulty/mode is like, but generally you wouldn't play through the same game 8-12 times no matter how big of a fan you were because the game focuses more on character developmental chores than it does on a straightforward epic strategy-packed adventure; to me, that's all the fun stuff and none of the chores/filler. Anyway, because Awakening and later games are balanced for casual mode, the other mode (with deaths) is not very fun at all, and so it's in your best interest not to use it; but it's a catch 22 because playing casual essentially turns off the tension/drama/sense of loss that the older games provided.

So, for me, going back and playing on those really out of date graphics and interface is still more fun than the much more advanced and more beautiful looking recent games (I am unsure how I feel about the look of the new game just yet).

That's just me, and I definitely fall more into the fan of the classic Fire Emblem games fanbase, the first one I ever played was Fire Emblem 4 on emulator; although I would say roughly 50% of all Fire Emblem I have ever played has been specifically FE; Blazing Blade (Fire Emblem Advance, the first one officially released in European markets).



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