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How does this school system compare to yours?

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Any thoughts on how this might compare to your own system that you grew up in?



That is the system I grew up in, and now I'm a teacher working in that system.



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Any written explanation for those of those that don't like videos?



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The issue here is go a google search and you will find 10 different lists and rankings that are so all over the place that you'd think the top 10 or so countries in the world would be all about the same. They all would have different education systems. It would also depend on whether a country is community focused or individualistic focused. Some countries teach children to work together to solve problems some teach them to do it themselves and not work in groups. I lived in both systems growing up.

I honestly think it comes down to an individual and how they prefer to learn. Forcing certain kids to form into a certain routine will not work for them and they just give up as the pace may be too quick for them. Me personally i liked to get shit over and done with that way I have more free time. So for example a school project that was meant to take months to do i would work hard for two weeks (5-7 hours a night after school) to get it done. Then i would kick back and enjoy my time off lol.

My only flaw that i still hate to this day is that at a younger age school for me was too easy, it actual made me disinterested in learning later on in higher education and i was going through the motions of study and over study without absorbing anything. Took me a while to get out of that routine.

Generally speaking when i got older i go stuck into the trap of i must study a lot to get good grades to get into uni. The issue there was i started over thinking it during tests and would question if i did something right or wrong and would fail as I over studied but in practice I wasn't absorbing information when I studied. When i took the relaxed approach I went with my gut intuition of what i knew and stuck with it. Uni for me was similar, when i studied longer i then started to second guess myself (ie. in Maths when the answer was 0, i wondered did i do it right, did i have the calculator on degree or should it be on radians).

My routine switched to a more relaxed, rock up to class and not take notes. Just sit there and listen and absorb the information. Then at the end of the month i would borrow someones notes and copy them. What i found was when i put 100% effort into concentrating and not dividing my attention in listening and writing I retained information easier and when i wrote it out later i still remembered like it was a fresh lecture in my head.

Now on the flip side I know people that cannot be that relaxed and need to write out a maths problem 10 times before they understand it.

So concluding. It is hard to judge from that video as it is very short. I think a balance between structure and freedom needs to exist, otherwise some kids will just go completely offtrack. 3 to 4 hours a day at school seems a little short, however the life experiences these kids learnt i learn after school because i've always had insomnia and was always keen to learn things late at night, so i can't judge for everyone. If you can give a child confidence in people skills, logical problem solving, and not giving up and be determined to get there, they will be able to handle most adult jobs later on. I also think kids with greater intelligence need to be guided more to ensure they do not become disinterested, make them challenge the way they think and solve problems.




 

 

Ka-pi96 said:
Any written explanation for those of those that don't like videos?

- Finland sucked at education

- changed system and world ranking skyrocketed

- secret sauce no homework

- 3-4 a day at school only (20 hours a week)

- no standardised testing, no multiple choice answers

- encourage you to aim for what you want

- all schools equal standard (as mostly free education and public) so rich kids and poor kids mix and become friends. meaning later in live rich kids will think twice before they screw their mates over



 

 

Not at all a realistic model to strive for because a major factor to Finland's success in their educational system are their demographics. It's rather just an anomaly I'd say ...

According to the latest PISA rankings, we're doing slightly better than Finland but even we don't have such amenities like no homework, very short school hours or a lack of standardized testing ...

For most nations out there, they should not model their educational system after Finland but ideally something like Singapore or Hong Kong because most of the best post-secondary schools absolutely have compulsory standardized testing for post-secondary school program qualifications. Weak students do NOT have a place in higher educational institutions and should not deserve a seat either in that case. Scholars should be encouraged to be hardcore test takers since that is what matters most in universities ...



First of all: 'Where to invade next' from Michael Moore is a great movie with an excellent idea. Still Moore focuses on some stuff, while others would focus on different things. That said some things of this are great. I am personally doubtful about no homeworks for instance, but getting rid of standardized tests is a big win in my book. Also focusing on personality of the students instead on their viability for later labor is also good.

I was schooled in the former German Democratic Republic (east germany). Finlands schoolsystem is sometimes compared to that that we had, but I already can easily see changes. No surprise though, as I was in school in the late 80s, 30 years ago. I think as finland tried to make their school system better, they shopped around for good ideas and looked for themselfes what worked. This is in my opinion the winner here. We can barely argue the results, Finland is constantly at the top of comparisons, so what they do works.



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fatslob-:O said:
Not at all a realistic model to strive for because a major factor to Finland's success in their educational system are their demographics. It's rather just an anomaly I'd say ...

According to the latest PISA rankings, we're doing slightly better than Finland but even we don't have such amenities like no homework, very short school hours or a lack of standardized testing ...

For most nations out there, they should not model their educational system after Finland but ideally something like Singapore or Hong Kong because most of the best post-secondary schools absolutely have compulsory standardized testing for post-secondary school program qualifications. Weak students do NOT have a place in higher educational institutions and should not deserve a seat either in that case. Scholars should be encouraged to be hardcore test takers since that is what matters most in universities ...

Inhowfar is Finlands demography special? Looks pretty standard to me:

Which country are you from?

As for Singapore: they do pretty well in recent years and with quite a different schooling system. I am against standardized tests though, this does not help students to think but instead to follow rules and predetermined routine. Makes for good workers, but bad innovators.

As I said, I was from GDR, which had a school system which generally was seen as doing pretty well and  which also had no standardized tests. As far as I know germany as a whole has no standardized testing routine in school to this day and does overall not too bad (better as the US in any case).



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Smaller classes, smaller schools, more teachers, is the secret. Merging schools, turning them into learning factories is not the right path.



In the first 10 school years I was about 5 - 8 hours a day at school. With 5 school days a week that makes about 30 hours per week. My daily homework was about 15 - 60 minutes. I lived in Germany. I was not very happy with the school system when I was young (although I had good school grades) and nowadays I almost completely disagree what is going to be teached at german schools. But that video has made me happy. Congrats Finland!